Posted in Drama for children, Esl Drama, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Role playing stories

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

 

goldilocks

All the children sit in a circle. When the children hear the following words in the story they must jump up and do the following actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher.

Goldilocks: Skip around the space.
Bear/Bears: Walk slowly and growl.
Bowl/Bowls: Clasp fingers together and stick out arms to make a round shape.
Porridge: Wiggle body up and down.
Chair/s: Squat down and stick out arms.
Bed/s: Lies straight on the floor.
First: Holds up one finger.
Second: Holds up two fingers.
Third: Holds up three fingers.

Once upon a time, there was a girl called Goldilocks. One day she decided to go for a walk in the woods. Soon she became tired. She saw a little cottage in the woods. came upon a house. She knocked, there was no answer so she decided to go inside and rest.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. Goldilocks was hungry. She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.
“This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed.
So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.
“This porridge is too cold,” she said
So, she tasted the third bowl of porridge.
“Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily and she ate it all up.
After she’d eaten the three bears’ breakfasts she decided she was feeling a little tired. So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs. Goldilocks sat in the first chair to rest her feet.
“This chair is too big!” she exclaimed.
So she sat in the second chair.
“This chair is too big, too!” she whined.
So she tried the third and smallest chair.
“Ahhh, this chair is just right,” she sighed. But just as she settled down into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!
Goldilocks was very tired by this time, so she went upstairs to the bedroom. She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. Then she lay in the second bed, but it was too soft. Then she lay down in the third bed and it was just right. Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” growled the Papa bear.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” said the Mama bear.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge and they ate it all up!” cried the Baby bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” growled the Papa bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” said the Mama bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair and they’ve broken it all to pieces,” cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more and when they got upstairs to the bedroom, Papa bear growled, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed,”
“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, too” said the Mama bear
“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed and she’s still there!” exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. She screamed, “Help!” And she jumped up and ran out of the room. Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door, and ran away into the woods. And Goldilocks never returned to the home of the three bears.

 

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Posted in Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, The Enormous Turnip

The Enormous Turnip – A five minute playscript for children

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Characters: Three storytellers, old man, old woman, boy, girl, dog, cat and mouse.

(Stage Directions: storytellers on stage left and the old man in the centre. All the other characters are in a line off-stage or they can be on stage, with each character miming doing their own thing.)
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a little old man.
Storyteller 2: One day he planted a turnip seed in his garden. (Old man plants his seed.)
Old Man: This turnip is going to be very big and very sweet. (Looks at the audience.)
Storyteller 3: The turnip grew and grew.
Old Man: I think it is time to dig up the turnip. (Old man mimes trying to pull it up.)
Storyteller 1: He pulled and pulled but he couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Old Man: I know, I will ask my wife to help me. Wife! Wife! Please help me to pull up the turnip. (Wife holds on to him at the waist and they try pulling up the turnip.)
Storyteller 2: His wife came and helped him.
Storyteller 3: They pulled and pulled but they couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Wife: I know, I will ask the boy to help us. Boy! Boy! Please help us to pull up the turnip. (She calls for the boy and the boy comes to help them.)
Storyteller 1: The boy came and helped them. (The boy holds on to her at the waist.)
Storyteller 2: They pulled and pulled but they couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Boy: I know I will ask the girl to help us. Girl! Girl! Please help us to pull up the turnip. (He calls for the girl and the girl comes to help them.)
Storyteller 3: The girl came and helped them. (The girl holds on to him at the waist.)
Storyteller 1: They pulled and pulled but they couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Girl: I know, I will ask the dog to help us. Dog! Dog! Please help us to pull up the turnip. (She calls for the dog and the dog comes to help her.)
Storyteller 2: The dog came and helped them. (The dog holds on to her at the waist.)
Storyteller 3: They pulled and pulled but they couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Dog: I know, I will ask the cat to help us. Cat! Cat! Please help us to pull up the turnip. (He calls for the cat and the cat comes to help them.)
Storyteller 1: The cat came and helped them. (The cat holds on to him at the waist.)
Storyteller 2: They pulled and pulled but they couldn’t pull up the turnip.
Cat: I know, I will ask the mouse to help us. Mouse! Mouse! Please help us to pull up the turnip. (She calls for the mouse and the mouse comes to help them.)
Storyteller 3: The mouse came and helped them. (The mouse holds onto her at the waist.)
Storyteller 1: They pulled and pulled and then suddenly they and then suddenly they pulled up the turnip. (They all fall over.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone was very happy and they all thanked the mouse. (Everyone shakes hands with the mouse.)
Storyteller 3: Everyone had turnip soup for dinner. (The wife mimes giving each one of them a bowl of soup and they mime drinking it.)

 

Posted in Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Voice Production

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

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Improvisation is an effective way for ESL students to develop language skills that they can use outside of the classroom. Improvisation develops skills such as confidence and empathy. The following activities give students an outlet to express a range of emotions. A variety of tenses, vocabulary, question forms, idioms and proverbs are the focus of this section.

Game: Forwards/Backwards
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The main language is to practice target language and the present tense.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space and copies of simple dialogues; see below for examples. Any of the dialogues from the teaching language books can be used.
Instructions: Divide the group into pairs and give each pair a copy of a simple dialogue. Give each pair time to practice their dialogues. When they have memorised the dialogues, get them to perform them in front of the class. Get the group to repeat it in slow motion, fast forwards, hopping on one leg, replacing the words with numbers or the alphabet, backwards, or jumping up and down.

Dialogue 1: Introductions
Adam: Good morning. What’s your name? Where are you from?
Anna: My name is Anna. I’m from America.
Adam: My name is Adam and I’m from Alaska.
Anna: Pleased to meet you. (They shake hands.)
Anna: Goodbye. (Waves and walks off.)
Adam: See you soon.

Dialogue 2: Giving directions
Betty: Hello, you look lost. Can I help you?
Brian: Yes, please. I’m looking for the football stadium. Do you know where it is?
Betty: Of course. Go straight (points straight), turn left and it is next to the big shopping centre.
Brian: Thank you very much.
Betty: You are welcome.
Brain: Goodbye. (They wave goodbye.)

Dialogue 3: Greetings
Carl: Hello, how are you?
Cathy: Not so good.
Carl: What’s the matter?
Cathy: I’ve a headache.
Carl: I hope you feel better soon.
Cathy: Thank you.

Extension: If the students are comfortable, get them to continue the dialogue until it comes to a natural conclusion. This is a good introduction to improvised work.

Game: TV Channels
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The focus is to listen and be observant as well as to react quickly.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: A volunteer sits in the centre of the circle. The rest of the students are the TV channels. The student in the centre of the circle is watching the television. He/she is channel surfing. When they point to someone in the circle, they have turned on the channel. The person must speak; they can be a news channel, weather, sports, documentary comedy, drama, or a soap opera.
The channel surfer stays on the channel for about 30 seconds and then moves on. They can always come back to the same channel. Everyone should have a chance at being a TV station.

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories

The Ants and the Grasshopper – A 5 minute play script for children.

Ant and Grasshopper, illustration

Characters: Three storytellers, three ants, grasshopper, owls, squirrels and bears.  

(Stage Directions: the owls, squirrels and bears are in a large semicircle stage right; storytellers are stage left and the ants are in the centre of the stage.)

Storyteller 1: One hot summer’s day …

Storyteller 2: … there were some ants working hard.

Storyteller 3: They were collecting food for the winter. (All the ants are miming digging, pulling and pushing.)

Ant 1: I am so hot.

Ant 2: Me too!

Ant 3: This is very hard work.

Storyteller 1: They saw a grasshopper listening to some music on his iPod. (Grasshopper passes by, singing and dancing; the ants stop work and look at him.)

Storyteller 2: He was dancing …

Storyteller 3: … and laughing and enjoying the lovely weather.

Grasshopper: Ants, you are so silly. You need to enjoy the sunshine.

(Ants start working again.)

Ant 1: We are working hard.

Ant 2: We want to have food for the winter. (Grasshopper keeps dancing.)

Storyteller 1: The grasshopper continued enjoying himself. (The Ants keep working and move stage right.)

Storyteller 2: Winter started to come and the weather got colder and colder.

Storyteller 3: The snow began to fall.

Storyteller 1: The grasshopper was cold and hungry. (Grasshopper rubs his stomach and shivers. He looks at the owls that start to fly around the stage.)

Grasshopper: I am cold and hungry; perhaps my friends the owls will feed me. Owls! Owls! Will you please feed me?

Owls: (Owls fly around the grasshopper and stop centre stage. They stand around the grasshopper.) Twit Tuhooo! Oh no, we will not feed you. (They fly back to their place in the semicircle.)

Grasshopper: Oh dear! I know, I will ask my friends the bears to feed me. (Grasshopper walks towards the bears.) Bears! Bears! Please feed me. (Bears are asleep so he wakes them up and they walk to the centre stage.)

Bears: (The bears are very angry that they have been woken up.) Growl! Growl! Oh no, we will not feed you. (The bears go back to their place in the semicircle.)

Storyteller 1: Then the grasshopper saw some squirrels. (The squirrels mime eating nuts stage right.)

Grasshopper: Squirrels! Squirrels! Please feed me! (They squirrels walk towards him.)

Squirrels: Oh no, we will not feed you. (They hop back to stage right.)

Storyteller 2: The grasshopper was very cold and hungry. He didn’t know what to do. (Grasshopper is shivering and rubbing his stomach.)

Storyteller 3: Then he thought of the ants. (The ants move to the centre of the stage.)

Grasshopper: Ants! Ants! Please feed me. (The ants go into a huddle away from the grasshopper.)

Storyteller 1: The ants thought about it and decided to give him some food. (All the ants face the grasshopper.)

Ant 1: You must promise that next year you will work hard in the summer. (Grasshopper gets down on his hands and knees.)

Grasshopper: Oh thank you Ants, I promise.

Storyteller 1: That summer the grasshopper kept his promise and worked hard to collect food for the next winter. (Grasshopper mimes pushing, pulling, carrying and digging with all the ants.)

Storyteller 2: The lesson of the story is: fail to prepare …

Storyteller 3: …prepare to fail.

If you would like to read more plays scripts based on popular Aesop’s Fables then click on the link below.

Posted in Drama for children, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Wilde's Stories, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, The Canterville Ghost

Classics on Stage Free book of children’s plays until the 21st of March.

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CLASSICS ON STAGE is FREE on Amazon today. Classics on Stage is a collection of ten plays adapted from popular and cherished works of children’s literature. This is a unique collection of scripts that will entertain and educate readers. The plays are written with a sense of fun, which will engage and delight children of all ages. The plays in the collection are:
The Wizard of Oz
Alice in Wonderland
How the Leopard Got His Spots
How the Elephant Got His Trunk
The Happy Prince
The Selfish Giant
The Canterville Ghost
Peter Pan
Pinocchio
Around the World in Eighty Days.

 

Posted in Role playing stories

Magical fairy tales -Improvisation

A book with a castle at the forest

Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Three lists: one with characters, one with settings, and one with objects
Instructions: Create three lists with the suggestions below or come up with your own. On the first is a variety of characters .
Here are some suggestions:
• Shrek
• Cinderella
• The Troll (from Three Billy Goats Gruff)
• Snow White
• The Wicked Queen
• The Bad Fairy (from Sleeping Beauty)
• Gingerbread Man
• The Wicked Wolf
• Buzz Lightyear
• Dora the Explorer
• Peppa Pig
• Mickey Mouse
• Little Bo Peep
• Pinocchio
• Jack (from Jack and Jill)
• Jill
• The Beast (From Beauty and the Beast)
• Little Miss Muffet
• One of the Three Little Pigs
• Prince Charming
• Jack (from Jack and the Beanstalk)
• Ugly Duckling
• Fairy Godmother

The second list is a variety of places. Here are some suggestions:
• A castle
• A dragon’s cave
• A haunted house
• A jail cell
• A superhero’s house
• A dark forest
• A stolen ship
• A wolf’s den
• A dungeon

The final list is a variety of magical objects. Here are some suggestions:
• Magical wand
• Magic beans
• Magic kisses
• A genie
• Magical dust
• Magic ring
• Magic potions
• Magic carpets
• Magic lamps
• Magic swords
• Cloak of invisibility

Divide the students into groups of three of four and have each child choose a character. When they have chosen their characters, each group must choose one setting and one magical item. They can pick these randomly out of a hat or can choose from the list, whichever the leader prefers. In their groups, they make up a story with their chosen characters, setting and magical object. If they are more advanced, they can do an improvisation based on what they have chosen.

Posted in Role playing stories

The Gruffalo – Drama for young children

The following drama is based on the Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson

Children are in the role of Monsters spotters (Mantle of the Expert technique). Ask them what do they need to know about monsters? Ask the children what monsters do they know and what ones have they spotted?
They are in the Monster spotters office.
They get a phone call.
They need to answer – hello my name is …… Monster spotter office how may we help you? They can practice their telephone voice. Get them to go around and shake everyone’s hand and say

Hello my name is …… Monster spotter office how may we help you

The magpie arrives and claims that a Gruffalo has been spotted in the woods. This can be done by the teacher using the teacher in role technique.– The teacher takes on the role of the magpie by using a puppet or changing their voice or their appearance. . The children ask the Magpie questions – (Hotseating technique).

The Magpie hasn’t actually seen the Gruffalo. He gives the children information but it is only hear say. The Magpie leaves and the teacher comes out of role and asks  the following questions. What do they know about the Guffalo? What does he look like? We don’t know but we know that the fox, snake and owl know so we need to go to the woods to find them and ask them about what they saw.

The spotters go to the woods. The teacher has collected and placed pine cones, stones, leaves, sand trays, mushrooms, flowers, piece of bark, twigs all around the room. The children go and touch the objects and feel them. Talk about how it feels and the textures of each items that they have collected. They put all the items on a large sheet of paper. They spray paint all around them so that they see what shape they make.

Ask the children what kind of animals are found in the forest. Ask the children to imagine that they are one of the animals that is found in the woods. Then the children to make a sculpt of their bodies into their animal and freeze (Still Image technique). When the teacher touches them on the shoulder they must shout out the name of their animal and move like it the animal and make the sound of their chosen animal (Role Play). Allow them to make the sound and movement of their animal for a few minutes then the teacher shouts freeze..

Divide them into threes and tell them one of them is going to be the owl, fox and snake. Get them to imagine that they have come across the Gruffalo. Show the face of how their animal will react to seeing the scariest animal in the woods. Are they frightened or are they brave. Do they run or do they stay? They make a still image. While they are in the still image touch them on the shoulder and get them each to tell you one word about how they feel as their character (thought tracking). Then in threes get them to move as their animal (owl, fox and snake) (Moving Picture technique). Get them to say the following together.

A gruffalo? What’s a gruffalo?”
“A gruffalo! Why, didn’t you know? He has terrible tusks, and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws.” (Choral Speaking).

Teacher asks what sort of questions would the monster spotters ask the fox snake and owl. The sort of questions could be what does he look like? Why is he scary? Where did he go? When is the last time you saw him? Where was he going? Get the children to devise their own questions.

Then the teacher takes on the role as the fox, snake and owl (Teacher in role) by using a puppet or changing their voices or appearance. The children ask their questions – (hot seating).

The teacher comes out of role and ask the children
What do we know? What information have we gathered..

Using different types and shapes of materials get the children as a group to create an image of what they think the Gruffalo looks like.

Teacher out of role asks the children if they met the Gruffalo what would we ask him? Why is he so scary? Does he want to make friends. Is it hard having no friends. What could he do to make friends. Maybe we could invite to the wood party so he can meet people.
Teacher in role as the Gruffalo – children ask their  questions. They make friends with him in the end when discovers that he is lonely and wants to make some friends.

The Gruffalo is invited to a party in the woods with all the other animals and he make friends with them.