Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, Halloween drama games

Halloween Drama Games for Children

Try this fun, Halloween drama games in you class.

Game: Crossing the Spider’s Web

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space

Instructions: The children stand in a circle and the leader gives everyone a number from 1 to 3. Then the leader tells all the 1s to exchange places by crossing the circle; and then all the 2s to cross the circle and so on. When the children understand what to do, the leader calls out different ways for them to walk across the circle:

Like a vampire

Like a bat

Like a pumpkin

Like a zombie

Like a ghost

Like a black cat

Like a witch

Like a goblin

Like a skeleton

Like a were Ghost

Like a mummy.

Game: What’s the time Mr. Ghost?

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This is a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.

Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Ghost and stands at one side of the clear space. His/her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Ghost?” The ghost does not turn around. He/she replies in a spooky, Ghost-like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the Ghost calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Ghost. The Ghost replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate number of steps forward. Eventually, when the Ghost thinks that the children are near enough, he/she will say: “Midnight!” Then the Ghost turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Ghost catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the Ghost in the next game.

Game: Monster Freeze

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This game helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.

Instructions: Play music such as the ‘Monster Mash’ or ‘Thriller’. The children dance to the music. When the music stops, they freeze. The last one to freeze is out. The game is complete when there is only one child left.

Game: Haunted House

Minimum number of participants: 7

Resources needed: Clear space and a chair for each child– if you do not have chairs you can use sheets of paper or cushions.

Other Benefits: This is a well-known game which can also be used very effectively as a listening game or an observation game.

Instructions: All the children sit in circle on a chair or a cushion. The teacher goes around the circle giving each child a Halloween character, in a particular order, for example, Ghost, Vampire, Witch. A child is then chosen, or volunteers, to go into the centre of the circle. His/her chair is taken away. The child in the centre calls out the name of one of the characters. If the child in the centre says vampire then all the vampire change place, if s/he says ghost, all the ghosts change place and if s/he says witch, all the witches change places. If s/he says haunted house, then everyone changes places. The child who is left without a chair goes into the centre for the next round.

Game: The Big, Black Cat

Minimum number of participants: 3+

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: The game also helps with the children’s expressive movement.

Instructions: The teacher chooses one child to be the big black cat. They must sleep in the corner of the clear space. The rest of the children imagine they are mice. They state to move and squeak around the room as mice. The teacher says: “The big black cat is sleeping, sleeping, sleeping; the big black cat is sleeping in the house.” Then as children dance around the space, the teacher says: “The little mice are dancing, dancing, dancing; the little mice are dancing in the house!’’ Next, as the children pretend to nibble, the teacher says: “The little mice are nibbling, nibbling, nibbling; the little mice are nibbling in the house! Then as the children get into a resting position, the teacher says: “The little mice are resting, resting; resting; the little mice are resting in the house!” The Teacher then continues the story as the children act it out: “The big, black cat comes creeping, creeping, creeping; the big, black cat comes creeping, creeping, creeping; and the big, black cat comes creeping in the house! The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering, the little mice go scampering in the house! The big, black cat comes creeping in the house! The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering; the little mice go scampering in the house! The cat chases the mice and when it catches a mouse it becomes the big, black cat.

 

 

Posted in Aesop's Fables, Books for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Plays for Children

The Sun and the North Wind – A Play for Young Children

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Characters: Three storytellers, rain, fog, snow, mist, cloud, man.

Storyteller 1: One day all the different types of weather were up in the sky.

(All the weathers are moving and interacting with one another on the stage, then the wind enters.)

Storyteller 2: The wind started to boast to all the other types of weather that he was by far the most powerful of all weathers.

Wind: I’m the strongest weather here and everyone knows it.

Rain: Wind, you are always boasting how strong and powerful you are.

Snow: It is all we ever hear from you.

Fog: Why don’t you just prove it once and for all?

Mist: I know – let’s have a contest to see who the most powerful weather is.

Wind: I will take any of you on and blow any of you away.

Cloud: Do you see that man wearing a coat over there?

(Man walks on stage.)

All: Yes.

Cloud: Whoever can make him part with his coat is the most powerful. (All the weathers look unsure except for the wind).

Storyteller 3: All the weathers seemed unsure that they could beat the wind.

Storyteller 1: The wind was confident he had won even before the contest even started.

Storyteller 2: Then the sun said…

Sun: I will beat all of you in this contest. I will make the man part with his coat.

Wind: (shakes the sun’s hand) let’s settle this once and for all.

Storyteller 3: The wind took a long deep breath.

Storyteller 1: He blew and blew…

Storyteller 2: …and blew and blew.

Storyteller 3: But the more he blew, the more the man held on to his coat.

Man: Suddenly the wind has got very strong. I must hold on to my coat really tight.

Storyteller 1: No matter how hard the wind blew, he couldn’t make the man part with his coat.

Wind: I give up.

Sun: My turn. Everyone watch and learn.

Storyteller 2: The sun started to shine. The sun got hotter and hotter.

Man: What a lovely sunny day it has become. I will take off my coat and sit under that tree over there and get some shade. (He takes off his coat and sits on it under the tree and enjoys the sun.)

Storyteller 3: The sun continued to shine.

Sun: I’m the winner. I’m the most powerful weather.

All: Hooray!

(Wind walks off in a huff)

Sun: Gentle persuasion always works best!

 

For more plays for children click on the links below:

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Books for children, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, The Hare and the Tortoise

The Hare and the Tortoise – A Drama Learning Opportunity for Children

image 

 

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action.  The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher.

Movement: Action.

Boast/boastful/boasting: Stand up straight and puff out the chest.

Woods: Children make themselves into trees.

Animals: Each child chooses a different animal found in the woods and moves like that animal.

Hare: Make bunny ears with your hands.

Fast: Children move as fast as they can.

Run: Run on the spot.

fTortoise: Children bend over as if they have something heavy on their back.

Slow: Children move in slow motion around the room.

Narrator: Once upon a time, there was a very boastful hare that lived in the woods with lots of other animals. He was always boasting about how fast he could run. He boasted, “I’m the fastest animal in the woods. No one can run as fast as me.” The other animals were tired of listening to him. One day the tortoise said to the hare,Hare you are so boastful. I challenge you to a race.” Hare laughed and said, “Tortoise, you will never beat me. You are too slow and steady.” They decided whoever got to the other side of the woods the fastest was the winner. All the other animals in the woods came to watch the race. The hare ran as fast as he could through the woods. After a while, he thought to himself, “I’m so fast that slow tortoise will never beat me. I think I will take a quick nap.” Soon he fell asleep. The tortoise walked slowly through the woods. He passed the sleeping hare. The animals watched the tortoise near the finishing line. The animals cheered loudly. The hare woke up and ran as fast as he could through the woods to the finishing line, but it was too late. The slow tortoise had won the race. All the animals in the woods congratulated the tortoise. The hare had to remind himself that he shouldn’t boast about his fast pace because slow and steady won the race.

 Physical warm-up: Get each child to find a clear space. They must make sure that they are not touching anyone else. The children crouch down on the floor and make a ball shape with their bodies. The teacher explains that all children are magic rocks and that the teacher is a magic wizard. The teacher waves the magic wand and says: “Magic rocks turn into hares.” All the children turn into hares and move around the room as hares. The teacher then says: “Magic rocks turn into magic rocks.” The children return to their clear spaces and crouch down on the floor again as quickly as possible. The magic wizard can change the magic rocks into the animal they can be found in the jungle.

Variation: The children can take it turns to be the magic wizard.

Role on the wall: Divide the class into groups of four. Give each group either an outline of the hare or the tortoise and ask the children to draw or write inside the image the different characteristics or personality traits of the hare or the tortoise. If they are too young to write, get them to draw inside the image. The teacher may also ask them what their word and write I. For them. Each group talks about their image and the words or drawings that they put inside.

Still Image/Thought Tracking: Ask each child to make a still image of the Hare at the beginning of the race. The teacher taps each child on the shoulder, and they must say how they feel. Then get them to make a still image of the hare at the end of the race. The teacher taps each child on the shoulder, and they must say how they feel. Can they tell the difference?

Slow-motion: Divide the class into pairs, and one of the children is the hare, and the other is the tortoise. They go to starting line, and they are going to move in slow motion to the finishing line but showing what happened between the start of the race and the ending.

Extension: They can go fast forwards or rewind.

Teacher in Role: The teacher takes on the role of the tortoise. She tells the children she feels sorry for the hare because he thought he was the fastest in the forest and now he is upset. Ask the children what they suggest they could do to make him feel better.

Hot seating: One of the children volunteers to be the hare. The hare sits in the hot seat, and the rest of the children asks him questions.

Three Little Pigs – a drama workshop.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – a drama workshop.

The Hare and the Tortoise – a five minute play.

If you enjoy this site and want to buy me a coffee then I would appreciate it.

Click below for more drama workshops for children.

Posted in Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama strategies, Drama techniques, Elements of Drama, Esl Drama, Improvisation, Improvisation around bullying

Improvisation for beginners

What is improvisation?

Improvisation is theatre without a script. The performers hear it for the first time at the same time as the audience. Improvisation is shared creation. Improvisers make it up on the spot, often working from a suggestion from others. We build ideas step by step, using, “Accept the offer and build on it.”.

 This means that the improvisers must  listen carefully and add to what their partner is offering.

Beginner improvisation activity: 1, 2, 3 Counting

This is a very popular warm-up and one Augusto Boal mentions in his book ‘Games for Actors and Non-Actors’. The premise is simple yet requires concentration.

  1. Divide the group into pairs and ask the members of each group to name themselves either A or B.
  2. Ask them to count to three as a pair with A saying ‘1’, B saying ‘2’, A saying ‘3’, B saying’1′, A saying ‘2’, B saying ‘3’ etc.
  3. Now ask the As in each group to come up with a sound and movement that will replace ‘1’. The pair will continue counting with each partner substituting the sound and movement for the number ‘1’.
  4. Now ask the Bs in each group to come up with a sound and movement that will replace ‘2’. The pair will continue counting with each partner substituting As sound and movement for the number ‘1’, and Bs sound and movement for the number ‘2’
  5. Now ask A to come up with another sound and movement, this time for the number ‘3’. By now, there should be no numbers heard, only the unique sounds and movements that have been substituted for each number.

This exercise is simple and low-pressure yet begins to awaken the creative muscles by calling on students to create movement and sound on the spot.

Warm up improvisation activity: Word Ball

Word ball is another simple game but regards a high level of concentration. It works by gathering the students into a circles and ‘throwing’ words around.

  1. Choose any word to begin with (e.g. cat) and place your hands as if you were holding the word in them, then ‘throw’ the word using both your voice and your hands to a member of the group.
  2. The member of the group must ‘catch’ the word, and then throw the first word that comes to mind (e.g. cuddly) to the next member of the group.
  3. The next member ‘catches’ this word, and throws the first associated word that pops into their head (e.g. teddy bear) to the next person. The exercise continues like this until everybody has had plenty of chances to throw words around. Try to dissuade students from hesitating and encourage them to simply go with the first thing that comes to mind, reminding them that there is no such thing as wrong or right when it comes to improv.

Some  Simple Rules for improvisation:

It’s time to introduce some basic rules of improv. Although there is no right or wrong, there are rules that can help in the creation of improvisational theatre.

RULE ONE: Offer and Accept

There’s nothing worse when doing improv than working with somebody who constantly negates your ideas. e.g.

A: Wow, did you see that elephant over there?

B: No. What are you talking about?

Negating an idea forces your partner to do all the work by coming up with idea after idea. In the example above, B has stopped the flow of the scene by rejecting A’s offer. If he had accepted it, the scene could continue quite easily:

A: Wow, did you see that elephant over there?

B: WOW! That’s the biggest elephant I’ve ever seen! Where do you suppose it came from?

Yes, and improvisation activity:

This is a nice little game that trains students to accept offers and add to them. Like in the second example above, B accepts the existence of the elephant, and offers a question as an addition to his acceptance.

  1. Divide the class into two even lines, call one line A, and the other line B. Have the two lines face each other
  2. Begin with the students who are at the top of the lines. Ask the student in the A line to come up with an offer. The student in the B line must accept and add to it. A must then accept B’s addition, and add to it again. e.g.:

A: Would you like to cut my hair for me?

B:Yes!I have a hairdressing set in my room, let’s do it there.

A: Great! I’ll bring a picture of what I want it to look like.

3.   When they’re finished, each student will go to the end of the opposite line (i.e. The student from line A will go to the end of line B, the line B student will go to the end of line A), and the next two students will have their chance to go.

  1. Keep this game going until all students have had a chance to be in both lines.

RULE TWO: Keep Questions Direct

Open-ended questions can really stump your partner as you are essentially forcing them to do the work in the scene. For example, starting a scene by saying

– What’s going on here? means someone else has to supply the information for the scene. A better way to go about it would be to say

-Why are you Riding that horsurs Here, you are still asking a question but are also supplying your partners with information while you do it.

The most basic ground rule is that there is no right or wrong. Something that inhibits a lot of students is the worry that they are somehow doing something wrong. Improv is about going with your impulses and creating something from them. While there are some rules we will cover in this lesson that can make improv easier, there is no right or wrong.

Teach your students to repeat these questions and answers to themselves when they are feeling unsure:

– How do I do it?

– Just do it.

– Am I doing it right?

– Yes

What are you doing? Improvisation activity:

Group stands in a circle. One person goes into the centre of the circle and starts an action (such as brushing her teeth).

A person goes into the centre, and asks, “What are you doing?”

The person brushing her teeth answers by saying something other than what she is doing. “I’m dribbling a basketball.”

The first person then leaves, and the new person starts “dribbling a basketball.” Then a new person goes in and asks, “What are you doing?”

And so on…

Encourage students to make new choices each time. (No repeats.)

Newspaper Headlines

In a group of 3 pr4, chose one of the following headlines:

Airline removes passenger who won’t stop doing pull ups.

Arrest over theft of £5million gold toilet from palace.

Fisherman gets shock, as he reels in dinosaur like fish with huge eyes.

Two headed snake, named Double Dave found in the forest.

Woman dreams of swallowing a ring and wakes up to find she has.

Queen returns pet monkey to girl.

Make a still image, freeze frame, mime, improvise the story.

 

Airline removes passenger who won’t stop doing pull ups.

 

Arrest over theft of £5million gold toilet from palace.

 

Fisherman gets shock, as he reels in dinosaur like fish with huge eyes.

 

Two headed snake, named Double Dave found in the forest.

 

Woman dreams of swallowing a ring and wakes up to find she has.

 

Queen returns pet monkey to girl.

Some other links:

Therapeutic Storytelling 

Anti bullying workshop for children

Posted in Action Poems, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Mime, Mime for kids, Movement activities

Emotions -a drama workshop for children based on emotions


Drama is a great way of expressing emotions. Explain to the children everything we do and every thought we have comes with a feeling. Sometimes the feelings feel good and sometimes not so good. Some feelings are strong, some are weak. When we feel something we can choos want to do about that feeling. Sometimes we try to ignore it and it goes away and sometime it takes over and we cannot think of anything else. When you get a feeling, first work out what it is and come up with an idea about what to do about it.

When you are feeling…….
Happy
Angry
Bored
Worried
Sad
Excited
Grumpy
Scared
Quiet
Jealous
Embarrassed
Shy

Everyone makes mask with different emotions. Walk around the trying portray their emotions.
The rest of the class has to get what emotion you are portraying.

ACTIVITY: EMOTION ACTION SONG.

The song is a variation on the classic “If You Are Happy, And You Know It.”

When I sing this, I over exaggerate my faces. And I encourage the children to make the faces along with the body language. So often we focus emotion lessons only on faces, but children’s bodies tell us how they are feeling too.

If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you are happy, and you know it, clap your hands.

Now replace happy with different emotions:

Mad – cross your arms.
Frustrated – stomp your feet.
Excited – jump up and down.
Sad – make a frown
Scared – hide your face.

Mirror, Mirror

Pair the children up. One child makes an emotion face and their partner identifies the emotion and duplicates it.

For more drama activities for children visit my amazon page.

For more free drama activities click below.

Drama workshop for children based on the Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

A Play  script for children – The Frog Prince

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, Plays that teach emotions, The Buddha and the angry man

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

The Buddha and the Angry Man

(How to handle an insult)

Characters:  Storyteller, Buddha, Angry Man.

Storyteller: One day, the Buddha was walking from village to village to spread love and compassionate. (He walks slowly, looking around taking in the wonders of his surroundings.)

Buddha: What a lovely, sunny day it is for a walk.

(Suddenly, an angry man runs towards him, waving his fists.)

Angry Man: Who do you think you are?

Buddha: Whatever is the matter?

Angry Man: You that’s what is the matter, you walk around, thinking you know everything to teach goodness and love. You are just a fake, silly man in an orange robe.

Buddha: Come sit with me. (He guides towards a tree and they sit in the shade.)

Angry Man: (confused)

Why are you not angry with my insult?

Buddha: I’ve a question for you.

Angry Man: What?

Buddha: If you buy a present for someone and that person doesn’t want it then whom does the present belong to?

Angry Man: What a strange question. Me, of course, I bought the present.

Buddha: That’s right and its exactly the same with your anger.

Angry Man: That makes no sense.

Buddha: It’s very clear, if you become angry with me and I do not accept your anger then it falls back on you and all you succeed in doing is hurt yourself more.

Angry Man: What should I do?

Buddha: Rid yourself of your anger and become a more a loving person.

Angry Man: I will try. Thank you for teaching me this lesson. (They hug and wave goodbye to one another.)

Storyteller: The moral of story is when you have hate and anger towards other people only you are unhappy.

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Fox and the Crow – A Five Minute Play for Chldren

 

Characters: Three storytellers, fox, crow, mice, dogs, cows, horses. You can have as many mice, dogs, cows and horses as you wish.
Storyteller 1: One day a crow was out searching for some food.

(Crow is flying around the stage looking for food.)

Storyteller 2: She came across a nice piece of cheese.
(She stops as she spots some cheese and she swoops down to get it.)
Storyteller 3: She grabbed the cheese with her beak and said…
Crow: What a lovely piece of cheese! I will keep it all for myself and not share it with anyone.
Storyteller 1: She flew to the top of the tree.
Storyteller 2: After a while some mice came along. They squeaked…
Mice: Squeak, squeak, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The mice were sad and hungry so they scampered off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then some dogs came along. They barked …
Dogs: Woof, woof, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 2: The dogs were sad and hungry so they bounded off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 3: A few minutes later some cows passed by. They mooed …
Cows: Moo, moo, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 1: The cows were sad and hungry so they walked off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 2: Finally, some horses came along. They neighed …
Horses: Neigh, neigh, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The horses were sad and hungry so they galloped off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then along came a fox. He said to himself…
(Fox faces the audience.)
Fox: That cheese looks delicious and it would be perfect for my breakfast.
Storyteller 2: Then he had an idea.
Fox: Good Morning Crow, you beautiful bird.
Crow: I’m not stupid. I know what you want.
Fox: All I want is to hear you sing. You must be queen of all the birds and your voice must be beautiful. I would love to hear you, but maybe I’m wrong. (The fox turns to leave.)
Storyteller 3: The crow was very flattered.
Crow: Wait Fox, come back. I’ll show you how beautifully I can sing.
Storyteller 1: She opened her mouth and began to caw.
Crow: Caw, Caw, Caw.
Storyteller 2: The cheese fell out of her mouth and onto the ground. The fox picked it up quickly.
Fox: Thanks very much. (He swallows the cheese and licks his lips.) Crow, I tricked you.
Storyteller 3: Off the fox went into the woods looking for another breakfast.
Storytellers: The lesson of this story is beware of people who flatter you.

To listen to the audio book of Aesop’s Fables on Stage click on the link below:

For more plays click on the links below.

The Money Pig

The Ants and the Grasshopper

Chinese New Year

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories

The Monkey and the Jealous Camel – A 5 minute play


The Monkey and the Jealous Camel

Characters: Three storytellers, Monkey, Giraffe, Lion, Kangaroo, Crocodile, Penguin, Monkey, Camel, Frog, Pig, Squirrel, Ant.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time a long time ago.
Storyteller 2: All the animals in the world decided to have a big party to celebrate the midsummer.
Storyteller 3: It was a midsummer party and all the animals in the world were going.
Storyteller 1: From the tiniest ant to the enormous elephant.
Storyteller 2: The animals arrived Two by two.
(Everyone sings the animals arrived two by two hurrah hurrah.)
Storyteller 3: Eventually, all the animals had arrived.
(Monkey is ticking off the all the names as the animals enter. He has a click board and looks very official. Giraffe is the look out.)
Monkey: Is that everyone?
Giraffe: I think so, I can’t see anyone else coming.
Lion: Well, let’s get this party started. Welcome, everyone to this party to celebrate the
midsummer. I hope everyone will have wonderful time tonight. I want to introduce the band. Back by popular demand all the way from the Jungle. I would like to introduce our band- the animals.
(Everyone cheers, and claps Elephant is playing her trumpet with his trunk, the bear is playing the drums with his feet. Other animal musical instruments.)
Storyteller 1: Everyone danced and chatted and had a merry time.
(Music playing.)
Kangaroo: Stop the music. I just noticed that the camel isn’t here.
Crocodile: Never mind him, he is so grumpy.
Penguin: He couldn’t be bothered coming.
Giraffe: No wait, I see something coming up in the hill in the distance.
(Monkey climbs up the tree.)
Monkey: It is the camel and he doesn’t look very happy.
(The camel trundles up the hill very slowly)
Penguin: We should be very welcoming to him, when he arrives.
(Camel eventually makes his way up the hill.)
Animals: Hello Camel, welcome to the midsummer’s eve party.
Lion: Come and join us.
Camel: (sighs and wipes his brow.) This better be a good party. I have come an awfully long way.
Frog: It will be wonderful. Let’s play a game of leap frog,
(All the animals jump over one another.)
Pig: That was fun but now let’s play piggy in the middle.
(All the animals throw a ball and the pig tries to catch it.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone had so much fun.
Storyteller 3: Then the dolphins performed a lovely water display.
(Music is playing.)
Monkey: now it my turn to show my contemporary dance.
Storyteller 1: The monkey danced, and all the other animals were impressed.
(All the animals cheer and clap when the monkey is finished.)
Pig: That was amazing.
Frog: You are such a good dancer,
Camel: Harrumph! What’s all the clapping and cheering about. Anyone can dance like that.
Kangaroo: That’s not true. The monkey is a very good dancer.
Ant: You are such a grumpy all hump, Camel.
Elephant: You are just jealous Camel, everyone knows camels can’t dance.
Camel: Of course, Camels can dance.
Monkey: Go on then, show us how camels can dance.
(The Camel slowly makes his way to the middle of the circle. All the animals are staring at him and there is a deafening silence.)
Penguin: Band, Music please.
Storyteller 1: The band started to play, and the camel started to dance.
Storyteller 2: It was the most peculiar dance they had ever seen.
(Camel gives a sideways hop and wiggle and then falls over and he bashes into the band and the music stops.)
Squirrel: Watch where you are going.
(The camel does a high kick and hits the kangaroo.)
Kangaroo: Ouch. (Kangaroo starts limping.)
Storyteller 3: The camel swings his tail and the rabbit is knocked to the floor.
Storyteller 1: Then, he nearly trod on the ants.
Ant/s: Oh, my goodness. Somebody stop him before he kills us.
(The camel is so clumsy that all the animals scatter to the far side of the stage.)
Lion: (roars) Stop! Stop Camel.
Camel: But I’m in the middle of my dance. Can’t you see I’m the best dancer here.
Storyteller 1: Then, the unimaginable happened.
Storyteller 2: He stood on the lion’s tail.
Lion: (roars).
(All the animals freeze.)
Camel: Is it just me? But I get the feeling you didn’t like my dance Lion. (Looks around.) why is anyone clapping.
Pig: Your dancing is ……horrible.
Camel:(hangs his head) I must admit that it wasn’t as fun as the monkey’s dance. (Looks at the monkey) You dance very well, Monkey.
Monkey: Thank you. You have special talents too. You can walk for miles without water and you can give everyone rides on your hump.
Kangaroo: Everyone has a talent.
Lion: The world would be a strange place if we all good at the same thing.
Camel: I guess you are right. Well who would like on my hump.
All animals: Me.
Camel: Hop on then.
Storyteller 1: The camel smiled with pride and pleasure.
Storyteller 2: The moral of the story is
Storyteller 3: Everyone is good at something.

For more animal plays for children click here.

The Thirsty Crow – A 5 minute Playscript for children

 

Posted in Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Plays, Plays for Children, St Patrick

St Patrick’s Day Drama Activities

 

St Patrick’s Day Drama Activities

 

Game: Rainbow
Age: 4 years+
Minimum number of participants: 7
Resources needed: Clear space and a chair for each student – if you do not have chairs you can use sheets of paper or cushions.
Other Benefits: This is a well-known game which can also be used very effectively as a listening game or an observation game.
Instructions: All the children sit in circle on a chair or a cushion. The teacher chooses three or more different colours of the rainbow – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet and goes around the circle giving each person the name of a colour in a particular order, for example, red, orange, yellow. A child is then chosen, or volunteers, to go into the centre of the circle. His/Her chair is taken away. The child in the centre calls out the name of one of the three colours.. If the child in the centre says red then all the reds change place, if s/he says yellow, all the yellows change place and if s/he says orange, all the oranges change places. If s/he says rainbow then everyone changes places. The child who is left without a chair goes into the centre for the next round.

Game: What’s the time Mr. Leprechaun ?
Age: 3 years+
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This is a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.
Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Leprechaun and stands at one side of the clear space. His/Her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Leprechaun ?” The leprechaun does not turn around. He/she replies in a leprechaun like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the leprechaun calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Leprechaun ?” The leprechaun replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate amount of steps forward. Eventually, when the leprechaun thinks that the children are near enough he/she will say: “Dinnertime!” Then the leprechaun turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Leprechaun catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the wolf in the next game.

Game: Colours of the Rainbow
Age: 4 years+
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This game helps the child hone their observation skills but it can also be used as a fun warm up or movement activity.
Instructions: The teacher calls out a colour of the rainbow, for example blue. The children must then look for an object in the clear space that is blue. All the children must run to the blue object. The last person to get there is out.

Game: Leprechaun’s underpants
Age: 5 years+
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This helps to improve eye contact and children body language. It also stimulates the imagination as the children have to come up with unique questions.
Instructions: The children sit in a circle. One child sits in the middle of the circle and everyone in the circle takes it in turns to ask him/her a question, for example: “What did you have for breakfast?” The child in the middle is only allowed to answer “Leprechaun underpants’ and they must not laugh or smile. If they laugh or smile they have to change places with the child whose question made them laugh.

If you want a copy of Irish Legends on Stage click here.

 

St Patrick – A play for children based on an Irish Legend

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years

The Tortoise and the Eagle

Characters: Two storytellers, tortoise, eagle, snail, squirrel, rabbit, crow, dove, robin.

Storyteller 1: There once was a tortoise that lived in a wood.

Storyteller 2: He was never happy.

Tortoise: I’m so bored. All I do all day is plod along. If only I could fly like the birds up in the sky.

(Birds come on stage and fly around. The tortoise looks at them with envy.)

Snail: Tortoise, why are you never happy. You have lots of things to be grateful for.

Tortoise: Like what?

Snail: You have a big hard shell.

Squirrel: You have lots of friends in the woods.

Rabbit: None of us can fly and we are not bored.

Storyteller 1: The tortoise sighed and said…

Tortoise: I don’t like being stuck on the ground. I think, I will ask the birds to help me. Birds, birds, could one of you take me up into the sky so I can see the wonders of the world.

(The crow flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Crow, crow, please help me fly.

Crow: No, I will not help you fly. You are too heavy. (Crow flies off.)

(Dove flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Dove, dove, please help me fly.

Dove: No I will not help you fly. You have no feathers, you aren’t meant to fly. (Dove flies away.)

(Robin flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Robin, robin, please help me fly.

Robin: No, I will not help you fly. It is too dangerous. (Robin flies away.)

(Eagle flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Eagle, eagle, please help me fly.

Eagle: I will help you fly.

(The eagle picks up the tortoise with his talons and starts to fly.)

Storyteller 2: The tortoise was so frightened he closed his eyes really tightly.

Eagle: Tortoise, you must open your eyes if you want to see the wonders of the world.

Tortoise: I can’t open my eyes. I’m too scared. Eagle, please put me down.

(The eagle puts the tortoise down and flies off. The tortoise starts crying.)

Storytellers: The moral of the story is be careful what you wish for.

For more animal plays for children click here.

The Lion and the Mouse – five minute play

The Hare and the tortoise – A play for children