Posted in Action Poems, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Mime, Mime for kids, Movement activities

Emotions -a drama workshop for children based on emotions


Drama is a great way of expressing emotions. Explain to the children everything we do and every thought we have comes with a feeling. Sometimes the feelings feel good and sometimes not so good. Some feelings are strong, some are weak. When we feel something we can choos want to do about that feeling. Sometimes we try to ignore it and it goes away and sometime it takes over and we cannot think of anything else. When you get a feeling, first work out what it is and come up with an idea about what to do about it.

When you are feeling…….
Happy
Angry
Bored
Worried
Sad
Excited
Grumpy
Scared
Quiet
Jealous
Embarrassed
Shy

Everyone makes mask with different emotions. Walk around the trying portray their emotions.
The rest of the class has to get what emotion you are portraying.

 

ACTIVITY: EMOTION ACTION SONG.

The song is a variation on the classic “If You Are Happy, And You Know It.”

When I sing this, I over exaggerate my faces. And I encourage the children to make the faces along with the body language. So often we focus emotion lessons only on faces, but children’s bodies tell us how they are feeling too.

If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you are happy, and you know it, clap your hands.

Now replace happy with different emotions:

Mad – cross your arms.
Frustrated – stomp your feet.
Excited – jump up and down.
Sad – make a frown
Scared – hide your face.

Mirror, Mirror

Pair the children up. One child makes an emotion face and their partner identifies the emotion and duplicates it.

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Posted in Action Poems, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A drama workshop for children

 

Warm up – Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices
Who has been sitting in my chair?
Who has eating my porridge?
Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:
Loud
Quiet
Fast
Slow
Sad
Happy
Angry
Excited
Surprised
Frightened
Annoyed

“Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….
Walk as
Daddy bear
Mummy bear
Baby bear
Goldilocks
Grumpy daddy bear
Kind mummy bear
Happy baby bear
Surprised Goldilocks”.

Main Focus:
Read the movement story Goldilocks and the three bears. Click on the link.

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

When Goldilocks went to the house of the Bears – movement poetry. Click on the link below.

Action Poems for Young Children – Movement

Closure: In groups of 4 make a still image of your favorite scene. Present your still image to the rest of the class.

Posted in Action Poems, buddha stories, Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama for children, drama for kids, Panchatantra plays, Plays, plays about destiny, Plays about graditude, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, The Buddha and the angry man, the Buddha and the beggar man

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

 

 


Characters: Two storytellers, Beggar Man, Mouse, Man, Woman, Daughter, Wizard, Giant Turtle and Buddha.


Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there was a homeless man who begged every day for food.
(People pass by and give him food.)
Beggar Man: I’m so lucky that kind people give me food.
(Beggar Man falls asleep and mouse creeps up and steals his food. The Beggar Man wakes up suddenly and sees the mouse.)
Beggar Man: Mouse, why are you stealing my food. I’m just a poor beggar man.
Mouse: I’m doing you a favour because no matter how much you beg or how generous people are, you will never be allowed to keep more than eight items.
Beggar Man: You has decided that I can’t ow more than eight items.
Mouse: The Buddha has decided.
Beggar Man: But why me?
Mouse: Why don’t you go find him and ask him.
(Mouse scampers off with the food.)
Beggar Man: Well, I better go find the Buddha and ask him why I’m not allowed to possess more than eight items.
Storyteller 2: So the beggar man gathered his few belongings and went on a journey to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He travelled all day. As night fell, he grew cold and hungry.
Beggar Man: There is no sign of the Buddha. I’m tired and hungry. There is a light over there. Perhaps if I knock on the door, they may let me stay for the night.
(He Knocks on the door. A man opens the door with a warm smile.)
Beggar Man: I’m cold and hungry, please can I stay the night?
Man: Of course, Please come in.
Woman: Sit down and have some food with us.
(He enters the house and sits down on a table with the Man, woman and their daughter.)
Man: Where are you going at this time at night?
Beggar Man: I’m going to find the Buddha. I’ve a very important question to ask him. I just need a good night’s sleep and I’ll be on my way early in the morning.
(Man and woman look at each other.)
Woman: We have a question for you to ask the Buddha.
Man: Our daughter can’t speak. Please ask the Buddha what we need to do hear her beautiful voice.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll ask the Buddha your question. Thanks you for the food and bed.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man continues on his way and his quest to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He comes across a range of mountains.
Beggar Man: Oh dear, the mountains look to difficult to climb but I really need to find the Buddha to ask my questions.
(He starts to climb the mountains.)
Beggar Man: This is very difficult. I will never make it. (he sits downs and starts to weep.)
(Enters wizard.)
Wizard: What’s the matter, young man? Why are you crying?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha but I can’t climb these mountains. I’ll never find him now.
Wizard: I’ll help you. We can use my magic to fly over the mountain come with me.
Storyteller 2: Wizard used his staff’s magic to fly the beggar man and himself across the mountains.
Beggar Man: Thank you so much, wizard. I’d have never made if it wasn’t for you.
Wizard: You are welcome but can I ask you a favour.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll do anything to show my gratitude.
Wizard: Can you ask the Buddha what do I have to do to get to heaven. I’ve been trying to get there for a thousand years.
(The beggar man nods his head and they hug and the wizard hops on his staff and flies off.)
Storyteller 1: The beggar man continues on his journey and comes across a river.
Beggar Man: I don’t believe this. How am I going to get across the river? (he sighs)
(Enters Giant Turtle.)
Giant Turtle: You look sad. What’s the matter?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha and I can’t get across the river to find him.
Giant Turtle: Jump on my back and I’ll swim across. (The beggar man jumps on the Giant Turtle’s back and they swim across the river.
Beggar Man: Thank you, Giant Turtle. How can I repay you?
Giant Turtle: Can you ask the Buddha a question for me?
Beggar Man: Of course, what is your question?
Giant Turtle: Ask the Buddha why I haven’t become a dragon. I’ve been trying to become a dragon for 500 years.
(Beggar Man nods and hugs the giant turtle.)
Storyteller 2: Eventually the beggar man finds the Buddha under the Bodhi Tree.
Beggar Man: I’m so glad. I’ve found you. I’ve got so many question to ask you.
Buddha: I will only answer three questions.
Beggar Man: But I’ve four questions to ask and they all very important.
Buddha: Ask yourself, are they equally important?
Storyteller 1: The beggar man thought very carefully.
Beggar Man: Well, the giant turtle is trying to be a dragon for fifty years. The wizard has trying to go to heaven for 1000 years. The young girl will be unable to speak for the rest of her life if I don’t ask her question. I’m just a homeless beggar. I can go back and continue begging. My question is the least important by far.
(Beggar Man goes back to the Buddha.)
Beggar Man: My first question is how can the turtle become a dragon?
Buddha: Simple, he needs to leave the comfort of his own shell, unless he does that he will never be a dragon.
Beggar Man: My second question is how can the wizard go to heaven?
Buddha: He must put down his magic staff as it keeps him on earth. The moment he puts it down he will be free to go to heaven.
Beggar Man: My third question how can the young girl speak.
Buddha: She will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Beggar Man: Thank you for answering my questions.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man turned around and started his journey home. He meets the Giant Turtle.
Giant Turtle: Hey Beggar man, did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Take off your shell and you will become a dragon.
(Giant Turtle takes off his shell.)
Giant Turtle: I’ve this priceless pearls in my shell. Here take them. I won’t need them anymore because I’m a dragon. Good bye and good luck.)
(The dragon flies off.)
(Enters the wizard.)
Wizard: Did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Put your staff down and you can go to heaven.
Wizard: Here take my staff, Use its power wisely. Thank you.
(The wizard ascends into heaven.)
Beggar Man: I now I’ve wealth from the turtle and power from the wizard. He hops on the staff and makes his way back tom the family that gave him food and shelter.
Man: Hello, did you ask the Buddha our question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Your daughter will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Daughter: Hello, you are the man that was here last week.
Woman: Looks like you found your soulmate.
(Daughter and beggar man hug.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story if you do good, you will be repaid.

 

If we’re willing to lend a hand to those who are struggling more than us, willing to help them, it may change the course of your life, your destiny. And the universe may repay you in such a way that you never would have imagined.

 

Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

 

 

Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click on the link below:

 

Posted in Action Poems, Drama Activities for children, drama for kids, Drama workshop for childre, English teaching games, Esl, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Body/self awareness Activities

image

Game: Colour Jump

Instructions: Ask the children to look at their clothing. Ask them to notice the colors they are wearing. Tell the children that when you name a color they are wearing, they will jump up and then sit back down. Be sure the children have enough space to move without hurting other children. If your space is limited, they can all stand and then hop when their color is called. Call out one color. Help children by drawing attention to the colors they are wearing. Example: “Mara, is that red on your shirt?”

Game: Alphabet Jump

Instructions: Tell the children that you are going to name a letter of the alphabet. When a child’s name begins with that letter, that child can jump up and then sit back down. Recite the alphabet, and pause when you reach a letter that begins a child’s name. If that child hesitates, repeat the letter and look at the child. You can prompt a child by saying, “B. B. I think Bryan starts with B.” If a child jumps on the wrong letter, say, “Oops, Janna, you jumped to

Game:The Shake it Song

Instructions: As you sing this little song, move your body with the words. (i.e. when you say “shake it high!” shake your arms and head up high. When you say/sing “shake it low”, bend down and shake your body in a low crouched or squat position – a pile for my ballet trained friends!)

SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
Shake it HIGH!
Shake it LOW.
Shake it all about!

(repeat at least 3X)

You can choose to turn around when you sing “Shake it all about” – or you can simply shake your whole body. Allow whatever movement happens freely as you play with your child. Sing the song at least three times. You really want to get into the fun like to end my 3-4 and 5-6 classes with what I call “body awareness freeze game”. So it’s like freeze dance except no one’s out if they move during a freeze moment. Instead, I shout out directions every time the music stops. There are two categories: directions that affect how they move, and directions that will affect the shape they will form with their bodies when the music stops.

For example, I may say: “until the music stops you will make a hand dance” and dance mostly with their hands. Then the music stops and I say “Now you will make a shoulder dance”. etc.
With the other variation, I let them dance however they want, and then I say “Next time the music stops I want you to make straight lines with your arms and legs” and then they do it when the music stops. Then I give them something else “Next time the music stops you have to have one foot and one hand in the air”… It can be anything really, I just want them to be creative and start problem solving with their bodies… When there’s a holiday coming up I ask them to shape their body like a star, like a Christmas tree, or like a heart for valentine’s day. They love it and that way they are still developing skills and body awareness while having crazy loads of fun!

 

 

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Closure activities, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Movement activities, Relaxation games

Action Songs and Poetry for preschoolers.

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Dingle Dangle Scarecrow
When all the cows were sleeping and the sun had gone to bed
Up jumped the scarecrow and this is what he said
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.
When all the hens were rousting and the moon behind a cloud,
Up jumped the scarecrow and shouted very loud
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.

Do Your Ears Hang Low?
Do your ears hang low? Do they wobble to and fro?
Can you tie them in a knot? Can you tie them in a bow?
Can you throw them o’er your shoulder like a continental soldier?
Do your ears hang low?
Do your ears hang high? Do they reach up to the sky?
Do they droop when they are wet? Do they stiffen when they’re dry?
Can you semaphore your neighbour with a minimum of labour?
Do your ears hang high?
Do your ears flip-flop? Can you use them for a mop?
Are they stringy at the bottom? Are they curly at the top?
Can you use them for a swatter? Can you use them for a blotter?
Do your ears flip-flop? Do your ears hang out? Can you waggle them about?
Can you flip them up and down as you fly around the town?
Can you shut them up for sure when you hear an awful bore?
Do your ears hang out?

The Hokey Cokey
You put your right hand in
Your right hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
Chorus
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Knees bent, arms stretched, rah, rah, rah!
(Chorus)
You put your left hand in
Your left hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your right foot in
Your right foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your left foot in
Your left foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your whole self in
Your whole self out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.

Little Bunny Foo Foo

Hoppin through the forest

Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head.

Down came
The good fairy
And the
Good fairy said:

“Little bunny foo foo
I don’t wanna see you
Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head!”

“I’m gonna give you
Three chances
Then I’ll turn you
Into a goon!”

Little bunny foofoo
Hoppin’ through the forest
Scoopin’ up the field mice and bopping
Em’ on the head

Down came the good fairy
And she said:

” little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you
Scooping up the field mice and bopping em’ on the head
I’ll give you two more chances then I’ll turn you to a goon”
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin’ through the forest scooping up the field
and boppin’ em’ on the the head

Then the good fairy came down
And she said

Little bunny foofoo i don’t want to see you scooping up the field
much and bopping them on the head!I’ll give you one more chance
and then I’ll turn you into a goon!
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin through the forest scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head

Then the good fairy came down and she said:

Little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head I gave you 3 chances and I’m
going to turn you into a goon!

POOF!

For more movement stories, poetry and games, click on the link below.

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Nursery Rhymes

Circle Time Activities for preschoolers

girls in classroom

Quiet Mouse, Still Mouse. Children sit in a circle as the leader announces which child (eventually, you hope, all of them) has become a mouse by being very quiet and still.
Alphabet Shopping. Using the first letter, match the child’s name with something to buy that begins with that letter. For example, “My name is Connor and I will buy a coat.” This facilitates teaching categories and organizational skills by using alphabet animals, foods and places.

Storm Leader starts by wiggling fingers for the rain, this passes around the circle until everyone is wiggling their fingers. The leader then changes the action to other aspects of the storm, e.g. wind – arms waving, thunder – slap knees. End with the sun – mime a circle.

Weather and calander of the day.– Start the day off by asking what is the weather like outside or what day is it. Find some visual aids or printables that show days of the week or months of the year or weather symbols to help you talk about these things.

 

For more drama games for preschoolers click on the link below.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl, expressive arts, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Rhyming Tales – The Lion and the Mouse

A king lion and a mouse under the tree

 

Rhyming Tales
The following poem can be used in a variety of ways: The practionner could read it at story time or the children could act out or mime the different parts for fun or in front of an audience. They could also be recited. Each child could learn four lines each and they could recite it as a choral piece. These stories help children with their vocal expression and give them an understanding of rhythm.

The Lion and the Mouse
There was a lion who lived in a cave.
He was extremely big and terribly brave.
The lion was not frightened of anything
Because he was the fearsome jungle king.
One day he was asleep near his house
When he was woken by a little mouse.
The lion grabbed the mouse with his large paw
He licked his lips and opened his wide jaw.-
The little mouse looked at him with sheer dread –
He didn’t want to be some scrumptious spread. –
“Squeak, squeak, Mr. Lion do not eat me
Some day I will help you so let me be.”
“You help me,” he said “I don’t think so
But I’m not that hungry, so off you go.”
One day while hunting deep in the jungle
The lion tripped over and took a tumble.
Suddenly he was stuck in an evil trap
The other animals began to clap.
He saw some grey elephants and he cried:
“Elephants, please help me I’ve swallowed my pride.”
“Oh Mr. Lion we will not help you
So how does it feel to be in a stew?”
The elephants said with extreme delight
And off they trundled into the dark night.
The lion waited and a few hours passed
Then out of the blue he saw some giraffes
“Giraffes, Giraffes,” he said, “please, please help me.”
The Giraffes looked at him and decided to flee.
He was extremely hungry and very cold
He was terribly tired and feeling less bold.
When all of a sudden down by the lake
He heard the hissing of a slimy snake.
“Snake, please, please help me I’m stuck in a trap,
I feel confused and I’m all in a flap.”
The snake hissed: “Jungle King I must admit,
You really do look like a proper twit.”
Snake laughed and laughed and felt real good
And away he slithered into the deep wood.
The Lion felt a sense of despair’
He was stuck outside in the cold night air.
Then all of a sudden out from his house
Came the patter of the little brown mouse.
“Pardon Lion I’m not one for prying
But please tell me why you are crying?”
The lion told the mouse his whole story
In all its wondrous gruesome glory.
The little mouse began to gnaw and gnaw
The scary lion sat there full of great awe.
At last, the lion roared: “I’m FREE I’m free.”
With that he invited the mouse home for tea.

For more rhyming plays click on the link below:

Posted in Action Poems, Drama for children, drama for kids, English teaching games, Esl Drama, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

 

goldilocks

All the children sit in a circle. When the children hear the following words in the story they must jump up and do the following actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher.

Goldilocks: Skip around the space.
Bear/Bears: Walk slowly and growl.
Bowl/Bowls: Clasp fingers together and stick out arms to make a round shape.
Porridge: Wiggle body up and down.
Chair/s: Squat down and stick out arms.
Bed/s: Lies straight on the floor.
First: Holds up one finger.
Second: Holds up two fingers.
Third: Holds up three fingers.

Once upon a time, there was a girl called Goldilocks. One day she decided to go for a walk in the woods. Soon she became tired. She saw a little cottage in the woods. came upon a house. She knocked, there was no answer so she decided to go inside and rest.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. Goldilocks was hungry. She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.
“This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed.
So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.
“This porridge is too cold,” she said
So, she tasted the third bowl of porridge.
“Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily and she ate it all up.
After she’d eaten the three bears’ breakfasts she decided she was feeling a little tired. So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs. Goldilocks sat in the first chair to rest her feet.
“This chair is too big!” she exclaimed.
So she sat in the second chair.
“This chair is too big, too!” she whined.
So she tried the third and smallest chair.
“Ahhh, this chair is just right,” she sighed. But just as she settled down into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!
Goldilocks was very tired by this time, so she went upstairs to the bedroom. She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. Then she lay in the second bed, but it was too soft. Then she lay down in the third bed and it was just right. Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” growled the Papa bear.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” said the Mama bear.
“Someone’s been eating my porridge and they ate it all up!” cried the Baby bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” growled the Papa bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” said the Mama bear.
“Someone’s been sitting in my chair and they’ve broken it all to pieces,” cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more and when they got upstairs to the bedroom, Papa bear growled, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed,”
“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, too” said the Mama bear
“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed and she’s still there!” exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. She screamed, “Help!” And she jumped up and ran out of the room. Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door, and ran away into the woods. And Goldilocks never returned to the home of the three bears.

For more animal move,ent storoes/plays, click on the link below.

Posted in Action Poems, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English teaching games, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

More Fun Movement Games for Children

 

image

 

Game: Call and Response
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space
Other Benefits: Creativity, focus, listening.
Instructions: Everyone sits in a circle. The teacher starts the activity by making a simple clapping rhythm. The rest of the circle repeats the rhythm. The child who is sitting next to the teacher takes a turn at making a simple clapping rhythm and the rest of the group copies it. When the group has got comfortable with the call and response technique the game can become a little more complicated. Each child must add on to the clapping rhythm that has gone before them. The child who is last in the round must remember everybody else clapping rhythm before they do their own.
Extension: Older children can stand in a circle and use different parts of their bodies to make the rhythms. For example they could use body percussion, stomping or tap dancing.

Game: Action Charades
Age: 4 years+
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space and a list of verbs.
Other Benefits: Critical thinking, creativity.
Instructions: If there is a large number of children divide them into groups of 4 or 5. Give each group a verb such as cleaning, cooking and swimming. One child will mime the verb to their group. The group members have a minute or two to guess the verb. . To reduce noise, have one group participate at a time, while the other group members watch.
Suggestions of Verbs:
Taste
Smell
Dance
Jog
Skate
Scream
Fight
Cry
Read
Write
Cook
Clean
Paint
Joke
Sleep
Sneeze

Game: Balloon Keepy Ups
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, balloons.
Other Benefits: Coordination, imagination, spatial awareness.
Instructions: Divide the group into smaller groups of six to eight, hand each group a balloon, and ask them to form a circle holding hands. The teacher tells them that, on her/his cue, they are to put the balloon in the air between them and to keep it up using the body part the teacher calls (e.g., knees) without letting go of hands. They are to continue until the teacher calls out a different body part.
Suggestion of different body parts that can be used:
Arms
Legs
Chests
Elbow
Fingers
Knees
Fists
Noses
Heads
Thighs
Shoulders
Face 

For more fun movement games clock on the link below.