Posted in Drama for children

Buddha Stories on Stage is Available Now for $0.99

 

 

Buddha Stories on Stage is a delightful collection of plays is based on famous Buddha stories. The plays are simple, so it is very easy for children to memorise their lines. The cast list is flexible – more characters can be added, and existing characters can be changed or omitted depending on the size and requirements of the group. The collection includes favourites such as The Enlightenment of the Buddha, The Man and His Four Wives and The Buddha and the Beggar. The scripts are simple and can be used as performance plays, reader’s theatre or just read for enjoyment. Please click below for your copy.

 

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Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Fairy Tales, Plays for Children, Plays that teach emotions, Role playing stories

Thumbelina – A Play for children.

Thumbelina

 

Characters: Three storytellers, Woman, Old Witch, Old Mother Toad, Thumbelina, Toad, Fish 1, Fish 2, Butterfly, Black Beetle, Beetle 1, Beetle 2, Mouse, Mole, Swallow, Tiny Man.

 

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there lived a woman. (Woman is sitting on a chair in the centre of the stage, looking very sad.)

Storyteller 2: The woman was very sad because all she wished for was to have a child of her very own that she could love.

Woman: Oh, how I long for a child to hold in my arms.

Storyteller 3: An old witch was passing by and she heard the woman’s wish. (Old witch hobbles on to the stage and she stops when she hears the woman talking.)

Old Witch: Here, take this barley corn. If you plant it carefully in the ground, your wishes will come true. (Old Witch gives the woman the barley corn but the woman looks very confused.)

Storyteller 1: The woman was confused but she took the barley corn and planted it carefully in the ground.

Storyteller 2: One day…

Woman:  What a beautiful red and yellow flower. (She kisses it.)

Storyteller 3: Pop! The flower opened and out jumped a tiny girl.

Woman: Oh my goodness, what a beautiful girl you are, but you are so tiny. You are no bigger than my thumb. I shall call you Thumbelina.

Storyteller 1: The woman and Thumbelina lived happily together.

Storyteller 2: Thumbelina slept in a bed made of a walnut shell and she floated up and down the river in her nice, comfortable shell.

(An old toad comes hopping on to the stage.)

Old Mother Toad: (Looks at Thumbelina.) What’s this? It is a tiny girl. She will make a perfect wife for my son. I will just take this walnut shell and no one will miss her. (She pushes the walnut shell down the river.)

Storyteller 3: Old Mother Toad swims down the river with Thumbelina fast asleep in her walnut shell.

Storyteller 1: When Old Mother Toad got to the swamp, she tied the shell to a waterlily stem.

Old Mother Toad: Toad, Toad, come here look what I found. (Toad comes running on stage. He looks at the sleeping Thumbelina and smiles.)

Toad: She is perfect. (He rubs his hands together and smiles with glee.)

Storyteller 2: The next day, Thumbelina woke up.

Thumbelina: What’s going on? Where am I? This is not my home. (Looks at the toad.) Who are you?

Old Mother Toad: I’m old Mother Toad and this is my son, Toad.

Toad: My mother thought you would make the perfect wife for me. (The two toads hop off stage.)

Thumbelina: But I don’t want to marry a toad and live in a swamp. (Thumbelina tries to free her walnut shell from the waterlily stem but she can’t. She starts to cry.)

(Two fish swim by and they stop when they hear the sobbing.)

Fish 1: What’s the matter?

Thumbelina: Old Mother Toad kidnapped me from my home. She wants me to marry her son.

Fish: We will help you. (They start to bite through the rope.)

Fish 2: At last we have done it. Now you are free.

Thumbelina: Oh, thank you, Fish.

Fish: Good luck, Thumbelina. (They wave goodbye as Thumbelina floats down the river in her walnut shell.)

Thumbelina: Bye, bye. I’m so happy to escape those horrid toads.

(A butterfly lands on the shell.)

Butterfly: Hello, what’s your name? What are you doing?

Thumbelina: I’m Thumbelina. An old toad stole me from my home. She wanted me to marry her son, but two nice fish helped me escape. I just want to go home.

Butterfly:  Hold on tight to me and I’ll pull your walnut shell so you can get home faster.

(Enters a big black beetle on to the stage.)

Black Beetle: Look at that butterfly with that beautiful girl. I must take her and show her to the other beetles.

Storyteller 3: The big black beetle swooped down and scooped Thumbelina up and flew off with her.

Butterfly: Hey, come back! You can’t just take her.

Black Beetle: Ha, ha. I just did. See you later, butterfly.

Black Beetle: Look what I found. A beautiful tiny girl.

Beetle 1: She is not beautiful.

Beetle 2: She doesn’t have any feelers.

Beetle 1: And she has only two legs.

Beetle 2: I have never seen anything so ugly in my life. Get rid of her at once.

(Beetle flies off with Thumbelina and then he sees a daisy. He put her down gently on the daisy.)

Black Beetle: I will leave you here, Thumbelina, on this daisy.

Thumbelina: I just want to go home, but I’m stuck here.

Storyteller 1: Soon summer passed and winter came. It began to get colder and colder.

Thumbelina: (Shivering.) I won’t survive the winter if I don’t find a warmer place to stay.

Storyteller 2: She climbs down from the daisy and enters a field, and there she meets a mouse.

Mouse: You look cold and hungry. Come warm yourself by my fire and you can eat my food. You can live with me until winter is over.

Thumbelina: Thank you, mouse. I will cook and clean for you.

Storyteller 3: Thumbelina lived with the mouse for a few weeks. She cooked and cleaned for him. One day, mouse came home. He was very excited.

Mouse: I just got a text from my friend mole. He heard I had the most beautiful girl staying with me. He wants to meet you. Let’s go and visit him.

Storyteller 1: They trundled through the field and they came to a tunnel.

Thumbelina: I don’t want to go down this tunnel.

Mole: It is the only way we can reach Mole’s house.

Storyteller 2: Finally, Thumbelina agreed to go through the tunnel. They were halfway there when they saw a dead swallow.

Thumbelina: We must help him.

Mouse: He is dead.

Thumbelina: Let me put a blanket over him.

Mouse: That is a waste of a good blanket.

(Thumbelina puts the blanket over the swallow and they continue the journey.

Suddenly, Thumbelina hears something and turns around quickly.)

Thumbelina: What’s that?

Mouse: I don’t hear anything. We have to continue our journey it is getting late. Mole is waiting for us.

Thumbelina: It is a soft thump. Listen. It’s the swallow’s heart. He isn’t dead. Mouse, get him some water.

Swallow: Thank you.

Thumbelina: Swallow, I will look after you. Come and stay with us at Mole’s house.

They go off to Mole’s house.

Mole: What’s all this?

Thumbelina: It’s a swallow. We must care for him or he will die.

Mole: Oh very well, come in.

Storyteller 3: At the end of winter, Mole announced.

Mole: Great news, Thumbelina. I’ve decided to marry you.

Mouse: Congratulations, Thumbelina. You are so lucky; Mole is very rich.

Mole: Mouse will return to field and you will stay here with me underground.

Thumbelina: I don’t want to stay underground forever. I want to be outside in the warmth and the sunshine. (She starts to cry.)

Swallow: I’ve an idea. I’m strong enough to leave. Jump on my back and we can fly away.

Storyteller 1: Thumbelina jumped on the swallow’s back and away they flew.

Thumbelina:  Bye, Mouse. Thanks for everything.

Mouse: Bye, bye.

Mole: How ungrateful?

Swallow: Do you see those beautiful flowers below.

(Thumbelina nods her head.)

Swallow: Choose one of those flowers and I will put you down there.

Thumbelina: That one, there. (She points to one.)

Storyteller 3: The swallow put her down gently and there sitting in the flower, was a tiny man with a golden crown.

Tiny Man: Hello? Fancy meeting you here.

Thumbelina: I’m Thumbelina. Who are you?

Tiny Man: Every flower has a sprite living in them. I’m the King of all flower sprites.

You are so beautiful. Will you marry me?

Thumbelina: Oh yes.

Tiny man: Here take these wings. Now you can fly from flower to flower and visit the other flower sprites.

Storytellers: They lived happily ever after.

For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click on the link below.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Drama for children

The Monkey and the Crocodile – A simple play for children based on an old Indian Story

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Char2acters: Three storytellers, the crocodile, the crocodile’s wife and the monkey.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a crocodile that lived in the river Ganges in India.
(Crocodile enters stage swimming slowly.)
Storyteller 2: On both sides of the Ganges there were large music fruit trees.
Storyteller 3: A monkey lived in one of the trees. He ate fruit all day.
(Monkey mimes eating fruit.)
Monkey: These fruits are so delicious and juicy I’m so lucky to live in a fruit tree.
(Crocodile sits under the tree for shade.)
Crocodile: It is very hot I think I will sit under this tree and sleep in the shade. (Looks up.) The fruits on tree look so delicious. I wish I could climb the tree and pick some.
Monkey: (climbs down from the tree) Since you are resting under my tree, you are my guest. Please come and taste some of my delicious fruits.
Storyteller 1: The monkey plucked the juiciest fruit off the tree and gave it to the crocodile.
Crocodile: Oh thank you Monkey you are so kind.
Monkey: You are welcome. Come again, any time.
Storyteller 2: Soon, the crocodile came every day. They would eat the fruit and talk to one another for hours.
(Crocodile and the monkey mime having a conversation and eating lots of fruits.)
Storyteller 3: One day as the crocodile was leaving to swim home. The monkey gave him some fruit.
Monkey: Crocodile give these fruits to your wife. I plucked them especially for her.
Storyteller 1: The crocodile swam home and gave the fruit to his wife, She was very happy.
(Crocodile swims home and gives his wife the fruit.)
Crocodile’s wife: These fruits are delicious. I have never tasted such sweet fruit in all my life. Where did you get them from?
Crocodile: I got them from my friend the monkey. He lives in the fruit tree so he knows which ones are the sweetest.
Crocodile’s wife: Does the monkey eat fruit every day?
Crocodile: Yes, only the sweetest and juiciest ones. Why do you ask?
Crocodile’s wife: Because that means his heart must be so sweet. If I eat his heart I would remain young and beautiful forever. You must steal the monkey’s heart and give it to me.
Crocodile: But he is my good friend. He is my only friend. It would be unfair for me to steal his heart.
Crocodile’s wife: (gets angry) If you loved me you would do it.
Crocodile: Do not get anger my dear, I will do as you wish.
Storyteller 2: The next day the crocodile swam to the riverbank and reached the tree where the monkey lived.
Monkey: Crocodile, you are late today. I thought you weren’t coming.
Crocodile: My wife has made a meal for you. She has invited you to tea because she wants to thank you for giving her your beautiful sweet fruit.
Monkey: That’s very kind of her but I’m a land animal, I can’t swim.
Crocodile: We live on a sand bank just jump on my back and I’ll take you there.
Storyteller 3: The monkey hopped on the crocodile’s back and away they went.
Monkey: Slow down, Croc. You are going too fast.
Crocodile: I’m sorry Monkey but I have to go fast because my wife wants to eat your heart for her tea.
Monkey: Oh Croc, you should have told me this before we left. I always keep my heart in the hollow of the tree for safe keeping.
Crocodile: I’ll take you back to the tree and you can collect your heart.
Monkey: That would be great.
Storyteller 1: Crocodile turns and swims back to the tree where the monkey lives upon reaching the bank the monkey jumps off the crocodiles back and clambers up the tree. After a while the crocodile says…..
Crocodile: Monkey, you must have found your heart by now. My wife will get angry if we don’t arrive soon.
Monkey: You are so foolish crocodile. Don’t you know your heart is within yourself? It was a trick to save my life. Now leave my tree and never come back again.
Storyteller 2: The crocodile left empty handed.
(Crocodile’s wife looks very angry.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story is at times presence of mind pays well.

Posted in Drama for children, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Movement Story – The Tortoise and the Hare

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Movement Story
The Tortoise and the Hare

Resources needed: Clear space and a copy of the story below.
Introduction: Ask the children do they know the story of the tortoise and the hare. Tell them you are going to tell them the story but instead of just sitting and listening they are going to participate in the story. Tell them that they are going to listen out for the following words and they have to do the action associated with that word when they hear it in the story. The teacher should explain any words that the children might not understand such as boastful – boast is telling everyone how good you are at everything. The teacher should go through the different words and their movement. If there are too many words for the age group the teacher can omit some of them. Once the teacher has gone through the words and the actions, she then shouts out words randomly to see if everyone knows the action. The children find their own space in the room so they can move freely and then the story can begin.

Boast/boastful/boasting – stand up straight and puff out chest
Woods – children make themselves into trees.
Animals – each child choose a different animal found in the woods and move like that animal.
Hare – make bunny ears with your hands.
Fast – children move as fast as they can
Run/ran – run on the spot
Tortoise – children bend over as if they have something heavy on their back.
Slow/slowly – children move in slow motion around the room.

Once upon a time there was a very boastful hare who lived in a woods with lots of other animals. He was always boasting about how fast he could run. He boasted “I’m the fastest animal in the woods. No one can run as fast as me.” The other animals were tired of listening to him. One day the tortoise said to the hareHare, you are so boastful. I challenge you to race.” Hare laughed and said “Tortoise, you will never beat me. You are too slow and steady.” They decided whoever got to the other side of the woods the fastest was the winner. All the other animals in the woods came to watch the race. The hare ran as fast as he could through the woods. After a while he thought to himself “I’m so fast that slow tortoise will never beat me. I think I will take a quick nap.” Soon, he fell asleep. The tortoise walked slowly through the woods. He passed the sleeping hare. The animals watched the tortoise near the finishing line. The animals cheered loudly. The hare woke up and ran as fast as he could through the woods to the finishing line but it was too late. The slow tortoise had won the race. All the animals in the wood congratulated the tortoise. The hare had to remind himself that he shouldn’t boast about his fast pace because slow and steady won the race.

Closure: Do you think the hare was boastful after the race? Why not? What lesson did we learn from the story? Now I want you to be your chosen animal again. Everyone line up we are going to have a race but you must move in slow motion.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A drama workshop for children

 

Warm up – Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices
Who has been sitting in my chair?
Who has eating my porridge?
Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:
Loud
Quiet
Fast
Slow
Sad
Happy
Angry
Excited
Surprised
Frightened
Annoyed

“Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….
Walk as
Daddy bear
Mummy bear
Baby bear
Goldilocks
Grumpy daddy bear
Kind mummy bear
Happy baby bear
Surprised Goldilocks”.

Main Focus:
Read the movement story Goldilocks and the three bears. Click on the link.

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

When Goldilocks went to the house of the Bears – movement poetry. Click on the link below.

Action Poems for Young Children – Movement

Closure: In groups of 4 make a still image of your favorite scene. Present your still image to the rest of the class.

Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

 

 

Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click on the link below:

 

Posted in Buddhism stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, The money pig by Hans Christian Andersen, The money pig play, The money pig playscript

The Money Pig – A Play based on the story by Hans Christian Andersen

Characters: One storyteller, Doll, Teddy Bear, Train Set, Colouring Pencil, Toy Car, Money Pig, Aeroplane, Mother.

Storyteller: Once upon a time, there was a nursery that had lots of toys. There was a doll, teddy bear, a toy car, colouring pencil, aeroplane and even a train set.
Doll: Look, at how beautiful I am. (Admires herself in the mirror.)
Teddy Bear: (Sings the lyrics and does the actions.)
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn around!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the ground!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Jump up high!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the sky!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Bend down low!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch your toes!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn out the light!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Say good night!
Colouring Pencil: I’m such a fabulous colour.
Train set: Choo, choo, all aboard. (He moves around the room and all the toys join him to make a train.)
Doll: What’s that up here? (Points to the top of the cupboard.)
Teddy Bear: Doll, that’s the money box in the shape of a pig.
Toy Car: He lives up there on top of the cupboard
Colouring Pencil: He doesn’t talk or play with any of the other toys in the nursery.
Train Set: He thinks he is way better than us.
Money Pig: I’m by far the best toy in the nursery. I’ve lots of money in my tummy. When I’m full, I can buy any toy in this nursery
Storyteller: One night while the family were sleeping, the doll said…
Doll: Let’s play house.
All toy: (Jump up and down.) Yes let’s.
Doll: What about the Money Pig. Let’s ask him to join us.
Teddy Bear: We will have to write him a letter because he is so high up.
Colouring Pencil: I’ll do it. (Reads out the letter as he writes it.)
Dear Money Pig,
Please join us.
We are playing house.
Lots of love,
From,
All the toys.
Aeroplane come here.
Aeroplane: Yes, colouring Pencil. What can I do for you?
Colouring Pencil: Please deliver this letter to the Money Pig.
Aeroplane: My pleasure.
(Aeroplane flies to the top of cupboard and delivers the letter.)
(Money Pig opens the letter.)
Money Pig: (Shouts down) I’ll join you but I won’t be climbing down to your level. I’m way too important for that.
Doll: We will bring the doll’s house in front of the cupboard
Storyteller 1: The toys took turns to act out different family stories.
(Toys improvise family scenarios.)
Money Pig: This is such a boring game. I’ll just sit here and think of all the money in my tummy.
Doll: Be careful, colouring pencil. You are going to crash into the cupboard.
Colouring Pencil: (Colouring pencil bashes into the cupboard.) Too late. I already have.
(Money pig begins to wobble.)
Money Pig: What’s happening. I’m losing my balance. I’m going to faaaallll.
(He crashes down on to the floor and the money spills everywhere.)
Doll: Oh dear, he is broken, but look at all the money.
Teddy Bear: Quick, someone is coming; back to our places. (All the toys run to their places and freeze.)
Mother: What’s all the noise about? Oh dear, what happened here? The Money Pig must have fallen off the cupboard. I better pick up all the money.
Storyteller: The next day mother came back to the playroom.
Mother: I used the money to buy a brand new Money Pig. (She places the new Money Pig on top of the cupboard.)
For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click below:

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Fox and the Crow – A Five Minute Play for Chldren

Characters: Three storytellers, fox, crow, mice, dogs, cows, horses. You can have as many mice, dogs, cows and horses as you wish.
Storyteller 1: One day a crow was out searching for some food.

(Crow is flying around the stage looking for food.)

Storyteller 2: She came across a nice piece of cheese.
(She stops as she spots some cheese and she swoops down to get it.)
Storyteller 3: She grabbed the cheese with her beak and said…
Crow: What a lovely piece of cheese! I will keep it all for myself and not share it with anyone.
Storyteller 1: She flew to the top of the tree.
Storyteller 2: After a while some mice came along. They squeaked…
Mice: Squeak, squeak, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The mice were sad and hungry so they scampered off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then some dogs came along. They barked …
Dogs: Woof, woof, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 2: The dogs were sad and hungry so they bounded off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 3: A few minutes later some cows passed by. They mooed …
Cows: Moo, moo, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 1: The cows were sad and hungry so they walked off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 2: Finally, some horses came along. They neighed …
Horses: Neigh, neigh, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The horses were sad and hungry so they galloped off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then along came a fox. He said to himself…
(Fox faces the audience.)
Fox: That cheese looks delicious and it would be perfect for my breakfast.
Storyteller 2: Then he had an idea.
Fox: Good Morning Crow, you beautiful bird.
Crow: I’m not stupid. I know what you want.
Fox: All I want is to hear you sing. You must be queen of all the birds and your voice must be beautiful. I would love to hear you, but maybe I’m wrong. (The fox turns to leave.)
Storyteller 3: The crow was very flattered.
Crow: Wait Fox, come back. I’ll show you how beautifully I can sing.
Storyteller 1: She opened her mouth and began to caw.
Crow: Caw, Caw, Caw.
Storyteller 2: The cheese fell out of her mouth and onto the ground. The fox picked it up quickly.
Fox: Thanks very much. (He swallows the cheese and licks his lips.) Crow, I tricked you.
Storyteller 3: Off the fox went into the woods looking for another breakfast.
Storytellers: The lesson of this story is beware of people who flatter you.

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