Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, Halloween drama games

Halloween Drama Games for Children

Try this fun, Halloween drama games in you class.

Game: Crossing the Spider’s Web

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space

Instructions: The children stand in a circle and the leader gives everyone a number from 1 to 3. Then the leader tells all the 1s to exchange places by crossing the circle; and then all the 2s to cross the circle and so on. When the children understand what to do, the leader calls out different ways for them to walk across the circle:

Like a vampire

Like a bat

Like a pumpkin

Like a zombie

Like a ghost

Like a black cat

Like a witch

Like a goblin

Like a skeleton

Like a were Ghost

Like a mummy.

Game: What’s the time Mr. Ghost?

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This is a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.

Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Ghost and stands at one side of the clear space. His/her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Ghost?” The ghost does not turn around. He/she replies in a spooky, Ghost-like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the Ghost calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Ghost. The Ghost replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate number of steps forward. Eventually, when the Ghost thinks that the children are near enough, he/she will say: “Midnight!” Then the Ghost turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Ghost catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the Ghost in the next game.

Game: Monster Freeze

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This game helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.

Instructions: Play music such as the ‘Monster Mash’ or ‘Thriller’. The children dance to the music. When the music stops, they freeze. The last one to freeze is out. The game is complete when there is only one child left.

Game: Haunted House

Minimum number of participants: 7

Resources needed: Clear space and a chair for each child– if you do not have chairs you can use sheets of paper or cushions.

Other Benefits: This is a well-known game which can also be used very effectively as a listening game or an observation game.

Instructions: All the children sit in circle on a chair or a cushion. The teacher goes around the circle giving each child a Halloween character, in a particular order, for example, Ghost, Vampire, Witch. A child is then chosen, or volunteers, to go into the centre of the circle. His/her chair is taken away. The child in the centre calls out the name of one of the characters. If the child in the centre says vampire then all the vampire change place, if s/he says ghost, all the ghosts change place and if s/he says witch, all the witches change places. If s/he says haunted house, then everyone changes places. The child who is left without a chair goes into the centre for the next round.

Game: The Big, Black Cat

Minimum number of participants: 3+

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: The game also helps with the children’s expressive movement.

Instructions: The teacher chooses one child to be the big black cat. They must sleep in the corner of the clear space. The rest of the children imagine they are mice. They state to move and squeak around the room as mice. The teacher says: “The big black cat is sleeping, sleeping, sleeping; the big black cat is sleeping in the house.” Then as children dance around the space, the teacher says: “The little mice are dancing, dancing, dancing; the little mice are dancing in the house!’’ Next, as the children pretend to nibble, the teacher says: “The little mice are nibbling, nibbling, nibbling; the little mice are nibbling in the house! Then as the children get into a resting position, the teacher says: “The little mice are resting, resting; resting; the little mice are resting in the house!” The Teacher then continues the story as the children act it out: “The big, black cat comes creeping, creeping, creeping; the big, black cat comes creeping, creeping, creeping; and the big, black cat comes creeping in the house! The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering, the little mice go scampering in the house! The big, black cat comes creeping in the house! The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering; the little mice go scampering in the house! The cat chases the mice and when it catches a mouse it becomes the big, black cat.

 

 

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Voice Production

Voice Production Activities

Vocal Production

The following three core elements of vocal production need to be understood for anyone wishing to become an effective speaker:

  • Volume – to be heard.
  • Clarity –  to be understood.
  • Variety –  to add interest.

Volume:

This is not a question of treating the voice like the volume control on the TV remote.  Some people have naturally soft voices and physically cannot bellow.  Additionally, if the voice is raised too much, tonal quality is lost.  Instead of raising the voice it should be ‘projected out‘.  Support the voice with lots of breath – the further you want to project the voice out, the more breath you need.

When talking to a group or meeting, it is important to never aim your talk to the front row or just to the people nearest you, but to consciously project what you have to say to those furthest away.  By developing a strong voice, as opposed to a loud voice, you will be seen as someone positive.

Clarity:

Some people tend to speak through clenched teeth and with little movement of their lips.  It is this inability to open mouths and failure to make speech sounds with precision that is the root cause of inaudibility.  The sound is locked into the mouth and not let out.  To have good articulation it is important to unclench the jaw, open the mouth and give full benefit to each sound you make, paying attention to the ends of words.  This will also help your audience as a certain amount of lip-reading will be possible.

Variety:

To make speech effective and interesting, certain techniques can be applied.  However, it is important not to sound false or as if you are giving a performance.  Whilst words convey meaning, how they are said reflects feelings and emotions.  Vocal variety can be achieved by variations in:

  • Pace: This is the speed at which you talk.  If speech is too fast, then the listeners will not have time to assimilate what is being said.  Nevertheless, it is a clever idea to vary the pace – quickening up at times and then slowing down – this will help to maintain interest.
  • Volume:  By raising or lowering volume occasionally, you can create emphasis.  If you drop your voice to almost a whisper (if it is projected) for a sentence or two, it will make your audience suddenly alert, be careful not to overuse this technique.
  • Pitch – Inflection – Emphasis:  When speaking in public, try to convey the information with as much vocal energy and enthusiasm as possible.  This does not mean your voice has to swoop and dive all over the place in an uncontrolled manner.  Try to make the talk interesting and remember that when you are nervous or even excited, vocal chords tense and shorten causing the voice to get higher.  Emphasize certain words and phrases within the talk to convey their importance and help to add variety.
  • Pause: Pauses are powerful.  They can be used for effect to highlight the preceding statement or to gain attention before an important message.  Pauses mean silence for a few seconds.  Listeners interpret meaning during pauses so have the courage to stay silent for up to five seconds – dramatic pauses like this convey authority and confidence.

The following activities will help to improve the children’s fluency with language. They also help to improve clarity of speech sounds and assist with vocal projection.

Game: Voice coach

Difficulty rating: **

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, index cards with emotions written on them

Instructions: Choose a simple sentence, e.g. “I want a can of Coke.” Write one of the feelings listed below on each index card. Have one child choose a card and then say the simple sentence in the emotion written on it. The rest of the class must guess which emotion the child is trying to portray.

Examples of emotions which can be used:

Calm

Happy

Sad

Stubborn

Surprised

Excited

Angry

Worried

Brave

Lonely

At the end, have the children repeat the sentence together, as they all use the emotion they have chosen from the card.

Game: Tongue-twisters

Difficulty rating: * to *****

Minimum number of participants: 1

Resources needed: Handouts with tongue twisters on them

Instructions: The children must start slowly and articulate each word clearly. They can go faster and faster as they feel more confident with the tongue twisters. If you have a large class, divide them into groups of four or five.

Some sample tongue-twisters to help you get started:

A skunk sat on a stump. The stump thought the skunk stunk. The skunk thought the stump stunk. What stunk? The skunk or the stump?

A tutor who tooted the flute, tried to tutor two tooters to toot; said the two tooters to the tutor: “Is it harder to toot or to tutor two tooters to toot?”

If Freaky Fred found fifty feet of fruit and fed forty feet to his friend Frank, how many feet of fruit did Freaky Fred find?

Pepperoni pizza on a pink-patterned plate with parsley on the side to your pleasure.

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers; where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

Red Leather Yellow Leather Red Leather Yellow Leather Red Leather Yellow Leather…

She shut the shop shutters, so the shopping shoppers can’t shop.

Unique New York; Unique New York; Unique New York …

Which wristwatch is a Swiss wristwatch?

I like New York, unique New York, I like unique New York.

Peggy Babcock loves Tubby Gig whip.

Two toads totally tired, tried to trot to Tewkesbury.

She stood upon the balcony, inimitably mimicking him hiccupping and amicably welcoming him in.

The sixth sick Sheik’s sixth sheep’s sick.

Betty Botter bought some butter

But she said, “This butter’s bitter.

But a bit of better butter’s

Better than the bitter butter,

That would make my batter better.”

So she bought some better butter

Better than the bitter butter

And it made her batter better.

So ’twas better Betty Botter,

Bought a bit of better butter.

 

In groups, write your own tongue twister.

Game: Broken telephone

Difficulty rating: **

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space, chairs/mats

Instructions: This is a classic game. With the class sitting in a circle, the leader whispers a simple message to one of the children. They must pass the message on to the child next to them, but they must follow a few rules. They must whisper but still speak clearly. They can say the message only once. When everyone in the circle has passed the message to the child next to them, the last child stands up and repeats the message they heard. The message has usually changed along the way, so the leader then tries to find out which children are ‘broken telephones’ as the ‘telephone’ may be broken in more than one place!

Tongues-twisters can be very effective messages to use here as they help children to be careful with their articulation.

Some examples to help you get started:

She sells sea shells at the seashore.

Four fat frogs fanning fainting flies.

Round the rock the ragged rascal ran.

 

Game: Stand back – the bridge is breaking

Difficulty rating: *

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Handouts of the poem

Instructions: The children each receive a copy of the poem below. They must read it out, making sure they recite it quietly when the writing is very small. Then they get louder and louder as the writing gets bigger and bigger, until finally they are projecting their voices as loudly as they can.

Pitter-patter, drops of rain

Tapping on the window pane

Now the rain is coming down

On all the houses in the town

Beating, battering shops and shutters

Hurling leavesf into the gutters.

Wildly lashing streets and fields,

Pelting rain and stormy seas

The river roars, the bridge is shaking,

Stand back, stand back, the bridge is BREAKING.

Game: Gibberish

Difficulty rating: ****

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space, index cards listing different situations

Instructions: Divide the group into pairs. Each pair chooses an index card that gives them a context for their conversation, see examples below. They then must act out the situation, but they can’t use actual words, instead they replace the words with letters of the alphabet. To get their situation across, they must focus on their tone, pitch, inflection, projection and pace to communicate their situation. The rest of the group must guess the context of the pair’s conversation and what is happening.

Some examples of different situations:

In a restaurant (waiter and customer) – customer complaining about the food.

At a hairdresser (hairdresser and customer) – customer trying to hide her disappointment about her haircut.

Under the moonlight (boyfriend and girlfriend) – he tells her he loves her.

Game: Sound spy

Difficulty rating: *

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space

Instructions: This is based on the traditional game of ‘I Spy’ but in this version, the children must look for something that has a sound. For example: I sound spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound ‘D’. It could be several things like a desk, a door or a dress. To make things more difficult, the children could say I spy with my little eye something that finishes with the sound ‘S’. It could be a variety of things like keys, pens or windows.

 

Game: Big balloon

Difficulty rating: **

Minimum number of participants: 1 (and the Leader)

Resources needed: Clear space.

Instructions: Each child must imagine that they have a balloon. They must blow it up and hold it at the end. Tell them that every time they breathe, they are pushing the balloon farther and farther away, until finally it glides into the sky.

Game: Secret voices

Difficulty rating: ***

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space, blindfold

Instructions: One of the children volunteers to be blindfolded. Everyone else is given 15 seconds to find a place in the room where they must all stand still. The leader points to one of the children, who are all standing still, and that child disguises his/her voice by changing pitch and tone and asks: “Do you know who I am?” If the blindfolded volunteer guesses correctly, s/he gets to choose the next child to be blindfolded. If s/he guesses incorrectly, the leader keeps picking children until the blindfolded child guesses correctly.

 

Game: Vocal projection

Difficulty rating: ****

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space

Instructions: Divide the group into pairs. One child in the pair talks about a topic such as holidays, sports, TV, school, and so on; the other child listens and after a few seconds says “louder.” Eventually the child talking will be shouting. After three or four times of saying “louder,” the listener can start saying “softer”. The listener can also go back and forth between “louder” and “softer” as s/he wants. This fun game leads to lots of laughs.

 

Divide the class into pairs. Divide the pairs into A and B. A read “The Hare and the Tortoise” B reads “The Three Little Pigs”. You must try to read the story with clarity, volume and expression.

 

The Hare and the Tortoise

Student A: Once upon a time there was a very boastful hare that lived in the woods with lots of other animals. He was always boasting about how fast he could run. He boasted, “I’m the fastest animal in the woods. No one can run as fast as me.” The other animals were tired of listening to him. One day the tortoise said to the hare,Hare you are so boastful. I challenge you to a race.” Hare laughed and said, “Tortoise, you will never beat me. You are too slow and steady.” They decided whoever got to the other side of the woods the fastest was the winner. All the other animals in the woods came to watch the race. The hare ran as fast as he could through the woods. After a while he thought to himself, “I’m so fast that slow tortoise will never beat me. I think I will take a quick nap.” Soon he fell asleep. The tortoise walked slowly through the woods. He passed the sleeping hare. The animals watched the tortoise near the finishing line. The animals cheered loudly. The hare woke up and ran as fast as he could through the woods to the finishing line, but it was too late. The slow tortoise had won the race. All the animals in the woods congratulated the tortoise. The hare had to remind himself that he shouldn’t boast about his fast pace because slow and steady won the race.

 

 

The Three Little Pigs

Student B: Once upon a time there was a mother pig that lived with her three little pigs. One day she said “Little pigs, I think it is time for you to leave and make your own way in this big world. You each need to build your own house.” The little pigs were very excited about their new, big adventure. Mother pig gave each of her little pigs a hug, but she warned them “Remember to watch out for the big bad wolf.” The little pigs waved goodbye to their mother and they trotted into the woods. They were laughing and smiling and soon they came across a man who was carrying some straw. The first little pig said, “may I have some straw to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the first little pig some straw to build his house. Just before they left the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The first little pig built his house of straw. The two other pigs trotted on down the road. They were laughing and smiling and soon they came across a man who was carrying some sticks. The second little pig said, “May I have some sticks to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the second little pig some sticks to build his house. Just before they left the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The second little pig built his house of sticks. The third little pig trotted on down the road. He was laughing and smiling and soon he came across a man who was carrying some bricks. The third little pig said, “May I have some bricks to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the third little pig some bricks to build his house. Just before they left the man warned him, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.”

The third little pig built his house of bricks. The first little pig had just finished building his house of straw when the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The first little pig replied, “Not by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, “I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down. The first little pig trotted very quickly to his brother’s house made of sticks. The second little pig had just finished building his house of sticks when he heard a knock on the door and to his surprise it was his brother. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The second little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, “I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down. The two little pigs trotted very quickly to their brother’s house made of bricks.

The third little pig had just finished building his house of bricks when he heard a knock on the door and to his surprise it was his two brothers. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The third little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” The wolf huffed, and he puffed. He huffed, and he puffed but he couldn’t blow the house down. He heard the three little pigs inside the house. They were laughing. This made the wolf very angry indeed. He decided he would climb to the top of the roof and come down the chimney. The third little pig heard him on the roof and he came up with a clever plan. He put a big pot of boiling water on the fire which was just underneath the chimney. The wolf came tumbling down the chimney and landed into the big pot of boiling water and “SPLASH!” That was the end of the big bad wolf. The three little pigs lived happily ever after.

 

 

 

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Easter drama games, Easter Games, Easter stories

Easter drama activities for children

 

Game: Magic Bunnies.

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, a wand (optional).

Other Benefits: To stimulate children’s imagination and creativity.

Instructions: Get each child to find a clear space. They must make sure that they are not touching anyone else. The children crouch down on the floor and make a ball shape with their bodies. The teacher explains that all children are magic Bunnies and that the teacher is a magic wizard. The teacher waves the magic wand and says: “Magic Bunnies turn into dinosaurs.” All the children turn into dinosaurs and move around the room as dinosaurs. The teacher then says: “Magic Bunnies turn into magic Bunnies.” The children return to their clear spaces and crouch down on the floor again as quickly as possible. The magic wizard can change the magic Bunnies into anything they want, for example superheroes, animals, people, household items and so on.

Variation: The children can take it turns to be the magic wizard.

 

Game: What’s the time Mr. Bunny?

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This is a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.

Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Bunny and stands at one side of the clear space. His/Her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Bunny?” The Bunny does not turn around. He/she replies in a rough, Bunny-like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the Bunnies calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Bunny?” The Bunny replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate amount of steps forward. Eventually, when the Bunny thinks that the children are near enough he/she will say: “Easter!” Then the Bunnies turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Bunny catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the Bunny in the next game.

 

Game: Bunny’s Tail

Age: 5 years+

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits:  A great game for developing a sense of teamwork.

Instructions: All the children form one long line, holding on to the child in front of them by the waist. The child at the top of the line becomes the Bunny’s head. The child in the rear is the Bunny’s tail. All the other children are the Bunny’s body and must work as a team to stay connected. The main objective is for the tail to catch the head while keeping the Bunny’s body intact.

 

Game: Chick, Chick, Chicken

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space, a balloon.

Other Benefits: This is a very good observation game but it also promotes teamwork and co-operation.

Instructions: Show the children a balloon and tell them it is a rotten egg. Get the children to sit in a tight circle, with their hands behind their backs. One child sits in the centre of the circle and closes his/her eyes. The child in the centre of the circle is the detective. The teacher walks around the room and puts the rotten egg into one of the children’s hands. The detective opens his/her eyes. The rotten egg should be passed around the circle, behind the children’s backs, without the detective seeing it. The detective has three goes at guessing who has the rotten egg

 

Game: The Bunny’s Court

Age: 5 years+

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other Benefits: This engaging game works very well as a role playing activity as the children take on the roles of the different animals.

Instructions: The teacher then assumes the role of a Bunny who is the King of the Easter Court.. It would be a good idea to have a crown for the Bunny. The children can make a court for the Bunny with chairs and a table or with cushions. Inside the court the Bunny sits on a throne. Each child chooses an animal they would like to pretend to be. The Bunny tells the other animals he is looking for animals to join his court. One by one he calls all the animals to him and asks them why he should let them join his court. The child must say what type of animal they are and what good qualities they have and how they will be useful to the Bunny, during Easter.. When they have finished the King says “you may join my court” and lets them in. This is why it is a good idea to designated area in the space that represents the court. Everyone is invited to join his court and there is an animal parade at the end.

The story of the Easter Bunny – a play for young children.

Posted in Animal Stories, Books for children, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama techniques, Fairy Tales, The 3 little pigs

Drama Workshop for Young Children based on the Three Little Pigs

 

 

The Three Little Pigs (Drama Workshop)

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud and when the children hear their word they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

 Movement: Action/sound.

Any number: Show that number of fingers.

Little: Crouch down as small as you can.

Pig: Get on all fours and oink once.

Pigs: Get on all fours and oink twice.

Big: Stretch up as high as you can.

Bad: Make an angry face.

Wolf: Make hands into claws and say “aargh.”

Laughing: Laugh loudly.

Smiling: Give a big wide smile.

Trotted: Trot up and down the space.

Straw: Rub your hands together.

Sticks: Clap your hands together.

Bricks: Clap your hands on your thighs.

Huff/huffed: Blow.

Puff/puffed: Blow harder.

Blow/blew: Stamp feet on the ground.

Narrator: Once upon a time, there was a mother pig who lived with her three little pigs. One day she said, “Little pigs, I think it is time for you to leave and make your own way in this big world. You each need to build your own house.” The little pigs were very excited about their new, big adventure. Mother pig gave each of her little pigs a hug, but she warned them, “Remember to watch out for the big bad wolf.” The little pigs waved goodbye to their mother, and they trotted into the woods. They were laughing and smiling, and soon they came across a man who was carrying some straw. The first little pig said, “May I have some straw to build my house?” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the first little pig some straw to build his house. Just before they left, the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The first little pig built his house of straw.

The two other pigs trotted on down the road. They were laughing and smiling, and soon they came across a man who was carrying some sticks. The second little pig said, “May I have some sticks to build my house?” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the second little pig some sticks to build his house. Just before they left, the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The second little pig built his house of sticks.

The third little pig trotted on down the road. He was laughing and smiling, and soon he came across a man who was carrying some bricks. The third little pig said, “May I have some bricks to build my house?” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the third little pig some bricks to build his house. Just before they left, the man warned him, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.”

The third little pig built his house of bricks. The first little pig had just finished building his house of straw when the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.”

The first little pig replied, “Not by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin.”

Then the wolf said, Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” So, he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down.

The first little pig trotted very quickly to his brother’s house made of sticks. The second little pig had just finished building his house of sticks when he heard a knock on the door, and to his surprise, it was his brother. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared.

He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.”

The second little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.”

Then the wolf said, “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” So, he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down.

The two little pigs trotted very quickly to their brother’s house made of bricks.

The third little pig had just finished building his house of bricks when he heard a knock on the door, and to his surprise, it was his two brothers. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.”

The third little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.”

Then the wolf said, “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” The wolf huffed, and he puffed. He huffed, and he puffed, but he couldn’t blow the house down. He heard the three little pigs inside the house. They were laughing. This made the wolf very angry indeed. He decided he would climb to the top of the roof and come down the chimney.

The third little pig heard him on the roof, and he came up with a clever plan. He put a big pot of boiling water on the fire, which was just underneath the chimney. The wolf came tumbling down the chimney and landed into the big pot of boiling water and “SPLASH!” That was the end of the big bad wolf. The three little pigs lived happily ever after.

Warm-up: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Wolf and stands at one side of the clear space. His/her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time, Mr. /Ms. Wolf?” The wolf does not turn around. He/she replies in a rough, wolf-like voice: “Four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the wolf calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it, Mr./Ms. Wolf?” The wolf replies: “Five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate number of steps forward. Eventually, when the wolf thinks that the children are near enough, he/she will say: “Dinnertime!” Then the wolf turns around and chases the children. They must try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Wolf catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the wolf in the next game.

Choral speaking: Teach the children the following poem. Get them to think of different actions for the straw, sticks, bricks, pigs and wolf. They say the poem in unison.

 Straw, Sticks and Bricks

Straw, sticks and bricks.

Straw, sticks and bricks.

The pigs built their houses

Out of straw, sticks and bricks

The wolf came by,

He blew the straw down.

He blew the sticks, but the bricks were strong

The pig lived happy all the days long

In their house of bricks.

Occupational mime: Divide the class into groups of 4: three pigs and one wolf. The pigs move round the room in a “follow the leader” style. The pig at the front of the line is doing the actions. The first pig mimes collecting materials and building a house of straw. Second and third pigs follow, copying the mime. When the house is blown down by the wolf, the first pig moves to the end of the line. Second pig then heads the line and mimes building house of sticks. Finally, third pig takes a turn and mimes building a house of bricks. The wolf moves around the room avoiding pigs as they build until it is time to blow the house down.

Role-play: Encourage different movements such as gathering straw, breaking sticks or lifting heavy bricks. Encourage the wolves to use their body and facial expression to look fierce and threatening. Give everyone in the group the opportunity to take on the role of the wolf. When the children are comfortable with the character movements, get them to use speech. Ask the following questions:

What does the wolf sound like?

What would he say to the little pigs?

What do the pigs sound like?

What would they say to the wolf?

Talking objects: Ask children if they can take on the role of the wolf. They use their breath to blow down the house. Get them to huff and puff and huff and puff and blow the house down. Everyone sits in a circle and the teacher presents the group with objects that can be blown down by the breath, the wind or a hurricane such as a leaf, balloon, paper, tree, car or even a bridge. Every child becomes an object; they enter the circle and give the group some information about who they are. For example: “I’m small, I’m green and live on a tree.” Once the rest of group have guessed correctly, everyone blows the object down.

Conclusion: The teacher discusses with the group reasons why the wolf gets very angry. The teacher asks the children how they can show the wolf how to relax using his breath. The wolf uses his breath to blow things down, but he could use his breath for relaxation exercises.

Tummy breathing: The children find their own space on the floor. They lie down and place their hands or a stuffed toy on their tummy. They inhale on a count of three. They see their hands or stuffed toy rising as their tummy fills with air. They exhale on the count of four and they see their hands or stuffed toys falling. Repeat this process 10 times. When everyone is finished, ask the children the following questions:

How do you feel?

What did you notice about your hands/stuffed toy when you inhaled and exhaled?

How would this exercise help the wolf?

Burst balloon: The children all lie on the floor. The teacher gets them to imagine that their body is a balloon. They are going to close their eyes and inflate the balloon. They fill up their tummies with air. Then when they are full, the teacher counts to three and the children shout bang and they let all the air out of their bodies like a deflated balloon.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, co-operation, Coordination games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

Group Of Children With Teacher Enjoying Drama Class Together
From more movement activities, games and stories, click on the image above.

The following movement activities promote the following types of coordination skills:

Gross motor coordination: This type of coordination is the movement of arms, legs and body that allows children to walk, run, jump, throw kick and twist.

Fine motor coordination: This type of coordination allows children toperform tasks that require precision. Activities that require children to manipulate small objects will improve their fine motor skills.

Hand-eye coordination: This type of coordination allows children to guide their hand to complete the task.

Movement Activities:

Movement activity: Doors and Windows

Age: 5 years

Minimum number of participants:10

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Spatial awareness, group work.

Instructions: The children form a circle while standing and holding their hands. The group spreads out enough so that everyone’s arms arestraight in the circle. This should form large spaces between the circle members. These large spaces represent the windows and doors. Then one child is chosen to be the runner. The runner starts running,and weaving in and out between the windows and doors. The children inthe circle randomly drop their arms down trying to touch or trap the runner who is weaving his/her way in and out of the windows and door.Once the runner is caught or touched by the arms of someone in the. circle, they are out. The runner chooses another child in the group to take his/her place and they become the next child to weave in and out of the windows and doors.

Movement activity: Centipede

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants:

Resources  needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Teamwork, trust.

Instructions: Divide the group into groups of 5 or 6. The children ineach group sit on the floor and hold the ankles of the child behind them. They call out left, right and the group has to try to move while everyone is holding the ankles of the child in front of them. If there is more than one group they can have a centipede race.

 Movement activity: Object Relay

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).

Other benefits: Imagination, teamwork, focus.

Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of childrenin the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the line. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of the line it has to be passed back. Suggested instructions:

  • Pass the ball overhead.
  • Pass the ball between your legs.
  • Pass the ball without using your hands.
  • Pass the ball by just using your chest.
  • Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.

Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must pass down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely is the winner.

Movement activity: Bean Bag Balance

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class Other benefits: Focus, imagination, problem solving.

Instructions: The teacher gets the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their head. Once they have mastered balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their body. Suggested Body Parts:

  • Knees
  • Foot
  • Hands
  • Thighs
  • Shoulder
  • Face
  • Wrist
  • Toes

Again, they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child that can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

 

Movement activity: Pick Up the Bean Bag

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space and a variety of bean bags, a basket orbox for each child.

Other benefits: Warm up, teamwork.

Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spreads them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect. The group could divide into sub-groups of three or four and have a race to see who can pick up the most beanbags in the time allotted.  

Movement activity: Roll the Dice

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, a dice for each member of the group.

Other benefits: Creativity, memory, focus.

Instructions: Everyone rolls their dice together. Each number corresponds to action such as: 1 Wiggle your body for 10 seconds. 2 Spin around 5 times. 3 Stand on your right leg for 15 seconds. 4 Hop 10 times. 5 Make a large circle with your arms 10 times. 6 Close your eyes and take 5 deep breaths. Once the children have become used to the actions, get them to come up with their own actions for each number.  


Movement activity: The Troll’s Bridge

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 3

Resources needed: Masking tape, objects to carry.

Other benefits: Energy, focus.

Instructions: Make a bridge with the masking tape. Tell the children that they are crossing a very narrow bridge and there is a troll thatlives underneath it. The children are crossing the bridge going to visit their friend. They are carrying a variety of objects with them.The children are told the troll won’t bother them if they stay on the narrow bridge and don’t drop anything. If they fall off the bridge or drop anything then the troll chases them. The troll can be the teacher or another child. If you want to make it more difficult tell them. to carry the objects over the bridge on their head.  

Movement activity: Cooperative Chase

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Warm-up, teamwork.

Instructions: One child volunteers to be “It.” If he catches another child in the group then they join together and connect. The connected pair need to work together to catch a third child who in turn would connect to them. They do it until everyone is connected. If the group catches someone and the connection is broken, then that child is free to go.  

From more movement activities, games and stories, click here.

For free movement activities click on the following: 

 

The hare and the tortoise movement story. 

Goldilocks and the three bears movement story

More movement activities for children. 

 

 

Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

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Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click here.

For more free movement games, click below.

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

More Movement Games for Children

More Movement Games

Posted in Buddhism stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, The money pig by Hans Christian Andersen, The money pig play, The money pig playscript

The Money Pig – A Play based on the story by Hans Christian Andersen

Characters: One storyteller, Doll, Teddy Bear, Train Set, Colouring Pencil, Toy Car, Money Pig, Aeroplane, Mother.

Storyteller: Once upon a time, there was a nursery that had lots of toys. There was a doll, teddy bear, a toy car, colouring pencil, aeroplane and even a train set.
Doll: Look, at how beautiful I am. (Admires herself in the mirror.)
Teddy Bear: (Sings the lyrics and does the actions.)
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn around!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the ground!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Jump up high!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the sky!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Bend down low!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch your toes!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn out the light!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Say good night!
Colouring Pencil: I’m such a fabulous colour.
Train set: Choo, choo, all aboard. (He moves around the room and all the toys join him to make a train.)
Doll: What’s that up here? (Points to the top of the cupboard.)
Teddy Bear: Doll, that’s the money box in the shape of a pig.
Toy Car: He lives up there on top of the cupboard
Colouring Pencil: He doesn’t talk or play with any of the other toys in the nursery.
Train Set: He thinks he is way better than us.
Money Pig: I’m by far the best toy in the nursery. I’ve lots of money in my tummy. When I’m full, I can buy any toy in this nursery
Storyteller: One night while the family were sleeping, the doll said…
Doll: Let’s play house.
All toy: (Jump up and down.) Yes let’s.
Doll: What about the Money Pig. Let’s ask him to join us.
Teddy Bear: We will have to write him a letter because he is so high up.
Colouring Pencil: I’ll do it. (Reads out the letter as he writes it.)
Dear Money Pig,
Please join us.
We are playing house.
Lots of love,
From,
All the toys.
Aeroplane come here.
Aeroplane: Yes, colouring Pencil. What can I do for you?
Colouring Pencil: Please deliver this letter to the Money Pig.
Aeroplane: My pleasure.
(Aeroplane flies to the top of cupboard and delivers the letter.)
(Money Pig opens the letter.)
Money Pig: (Shouts down) I’ll join you but I won’t be climbing down to your level. I’m way too important for that.
Doll: We will bring the doll’s house in front of the cupboard
Storyteller 1: The toys took turns to act out different family stories.
(Toys improvise family scenarios.)
Money Pig: This is such a boring game. I’ll just sit here and think of all the money in my tummy.
Doll: Be careful, colouring pencil. You are going to crash into the cupboard.
Colouring Pencil: (Colouring pencil bashes into the cupboard.) Too late. I already have.
(Money pig begins to wobble.)
Money Pig: What’s happening. I’m losing my balance. I’m going to faaaallll.
(He crashes down on to the floor and the money spills everywhere.)
Doll: Oh dear, he is broken, but look at all the money.
Teddy Bear: Quick, someone is coming; back to our places. (All the toys run to their places and freeze.)
Mother: What’s all the noise about? Oh dear, what happened here? The Money Pig must have fallen off the cupboard. I better pick up all the money.
Storyteller: The next day mother came back to the playroom.
Mother: I used the money to buy a brand new Money Pig. (She places the new Money Pig on top of the cupboard.)
For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click here.

 

The 🐸 Prince – A five minute Playscript for children.

The Little Mermaid – A Children’s Play.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories

The Monkey and the Jealous Camel – A 5 minute play


The Monkey and the Jealous Camel

Characters: Three storytellers, Monkey, Giraffe, Lion, Kangaroo, Crocodile, Penguin, Monkey, Camel, Frog, Pig, Squirrel, Ant.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time a long time ago.
Storyteller 2: All the animals in the world decided to have a big party to celebrate the midsummer.
Storyteller 3: It was a midsummer party and all the animals in the world were going.
Storyteller 1: From the tiniest ant to the enormous elephant.
Storyteller 2: The animals arrived Two by two.
(Everyone sings the animals arrived two by two hurrah hurrah.)
Storyteller 3: Eventually, all the animals had arrived.
(Monkey is ticking off the all the names as the animals enter. He has a click board and looks very official. Giraffe is the look out.)
Monkey: Is that everyone?
Giraffe: I think so, I can’t see anyone else coming.
Lion: Well, let’s get this party started. Welcome, everyone to this party to celebrate the
midsummer. I hope everyone will have wonderful time tonight. I want to introduce the band. Back by popular demand all the way from the Jungle. I would like to introduce our band- the animals.
(Everyone cheers, and claps Elephant is playing her trumpet with his trunk, the bear is playing the drums with his feet. Other animal musical instruments.)
Storyteller 1: Everyone danced and chatted and had a merry time.
(Music playing.)
Kangaroo: Stop the music. I just noticed that the camel isn’t here.
Crocodile: Never mind him, he is so grumpy.
Penguin: He couldn’t be bothered coming.
Giraffe: No wait, I see something coming up in the hill in the distance.
(Monkey climbs up the tree.)
Monkey: It is the camel and he doesn’t look very happy.
(The camel trundles up the hill very slowly)
Penguin: We should be very welcoming to him, when he arrives.
(Camel eventually makes his way up the hill.)
Animals: Hello Camel, welcome to the midsummer’s eve party.
Lion: Come and join us.
Camel: (sighs and wipes his brow.) This better be a good party. I have come an awfully long way.
Frog: It will be wonderful. Let’s play a game of leap frog,
(All the animals jump over one another.)
Pig: That was fun but now let’s play piggy in the middle.
(All the animals throw a ball and the pig tries to catch it.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone had so much fun.
Storyteller 3: Then the dolphins performed a lovely water display.
(Music is playing.)
Monkey: now it my turn to show my contemporary dance.
Storyteller 1: The monkey danced, and all the other animals were impressed.
(All the animals cheer and clap when the monkey is finished.)
Pig: That was amazing.
Frog: You are such a good dancer,
Camel: Harrumph! What’s all the clapping and cheering about. Anyone can dance like that.
Kangaroo: That’s not true. The monkey is a very good dancer.
Ant: You are such a grumpy all hump, Camel.
Elephant: You are just jealous Camel, everyone knows camels can’t dance.
Camel: Of course, Camels can dance.
Monkey: Go on then, show us how camels can dance.
(The Camel slowly makes his way to the middle of the circle. All the animals are staring at him and there is a deafening silence.)
Penguin: Band, Music please.
Storyteller 1: The band started to play, and the camel started to dance.
Storyteller 2: It was the most peculiar dance they had ever seen.
(Camel gives a sideways hop and wiggle and then falls over and he bashes into the band and the music stops.)
Squirrel: Watch where you are going.
(The camel does a high kick and hits the kangaroo.)
Kangaroo: Ouch. (Kangaroo starts limping.)
Storyteller 3: The camel swings his tail and the rabbit is knocked to the floor.
Storyteller 1: Then, he nearly trod on the ants.
Ant/s: Oh, my goodness. Somebody stop him before he kills us.
(The camel is so clumsy that all the animals scatter to the far side of the stage.)
Lion: (roars) Stop! Stop Camel.
Camel: But I’m in the middle of my dance. Can’t you see I’m the best dancer here.
Storyteller 1: Then, the unimaginable happened.
Storyteller 2: He stood on the lion’s tail.
Lion: (roars).
(All the animals freeze.)
Camel: Is it just me? But I get the feeling you didn’t like my dance Lion. (Looks around.) why is anyone clapping.
Pig: Your dancing is ……horrible.
Camel:(hangs his head) I must admit that it wasn’t as fun as the monkey’s dance. (Looks at the monkey) You dance very well, Monkey.
Monkey: Thank you. You have special talents too. You can walk for miles without water and you can give everyone rides on your hump.
Kangaroo: Everyone has a talent.
Lion: The world would be a strange place if we all good at the same thing.
Camel: I guess you are right. Well who would like on my hump.
All animals: Me.
Camel: Hop on then.
Storyteller 1: The camel smiled with pride and pleasure.
Storyteller 2: The moral of the story is
Storyteller 3: Everyone is good at something.

For more animal plays for children click here.

The Thirsty Crow – A 5 minute Playscript for children

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Aesop’s Fables

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About Aesop:
Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller who was is believed to have lived around 500 B.C. He was a Phrygian slave. He was owned by two different masters before gaining his freedom due to his intelligence. He went from place to place telling his fables to the masses however it is also widely believed that he did not write most of them, he just collected them. Aesop’s fables were used to offer advice to their audience. He supposedly met his death by being thrown a cliff at Delphi for being ugly and deformed. Over the centuries Aesop’s fables have been rewritten, illustrated and translated into every language in the world.

About Fables:
A fable is a short story. Fables typically involve animals with human like qualities. Usually in a fable, the time and the place are unspecified. Often fables illustrate how smaller and weaker characters use their intelligence to defeat the bigger and more powerful characters. There is always a hero, a villain, a character with a weakness and most importantly a moral. A moral is a lifelong lesson.

The most common characters found in fables are:
Rabbit
Fox
Crow
Bear
Rooster
Duck
Pig
Eagle
Hen
Wolf
Monkey
Donkey
Mouse
Rat
Cow
Goose
Lion
Boy
Girl.

There are always good characters and evil characters.
Examples of good characters:

Mouse
Kitten
Bunny
Cow.
Examples of evil characters:
Snake
Lion
Rat
Bear.

Write your own fable:

Title:

Characters:
Hero:

Villain:

Character with a weakness:


Setting:


Problem:


Solution:


Trickery:


Moral:

The Lion and Mouse

A Lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little Mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the Lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her.

“Spare me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will surely repay you.”

The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.

Some days later, while stalking his prey in the forest, the Lion was caught in the toils of a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse knew the voice and quickly found the Lion struggling in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she gnawed it until it parted, and soon the Lion was free.

“You laughed when I said I would repay you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”

“A kindness is never wasted”

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.

The lion and the mouse – a drama workshop for children.

Posted in Circle games, Closure activities, co-operation, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama

Teach English through Drama Games

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Drama games are a perfect tool to use in any classroom that encompasses
multiple learning styles, ability levels and age groups in addition, the activities in this book help ESL students to access active language in an effective and imaginative way. The activities in this
book facilitate students’ ability to learn in different ways as visual learners, auditory learners and kinaesthetic learners. 
Here are a few fun, challenging and rewarding drama games.

Game: The Fishing Game
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The focus of this game is to practice directions. It will also help students to become familiar with different types of fish.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: The students sit in a circle. The teacher goes around circle and gives each student a fish name such as a dog fish, sun fish, star fish, and cat fish. Then, the teacher chooses one type of fish and the students that are assigned that fish move around the outside of the circle to instructions like high seas- stretching as high as they can, low seas- crouching as low as they can, choppy seas- jumping or hopping, change direction, and then when the teacher calls ‘shark is coming’ they must run back as quickly as they can to their place in the circle. Repeat until all the fish have got a chance.

Game: World’s Greatest Sandwich
Level: Elementary
Other benefits: This is an excellent concentration and memory game. It will help to extend and explore vocabulary.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: This is an activity can be used as a getting to know you activity as well as giving the students an opportunity to practice specific vocabulary. The students sit in a circle the first-person starts.
Student A: Hi my name is Adam and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs in it.
Student B: Hi my name is Betty and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs and bananas in it.
Student C: Hi my name is Carol and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs, bananas and pickles in it
Everyone in the circle gets a chance. If they make a mistake or pause too long they are out. The game keeps going until there is only one person left.
Extension: This game could be used to practice other types of vocabulary.
Examples:
• The world greatest zoo has …………. (zoo)
• The world’s greatest rainbow has ………… (colours)
• The world greatest orchestra has ………… (musical instruments)

Game: I Like but I don’t Like
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This game helps to promote the students’ creativity. It also focuses on negatives.
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Go around the circle and each student says what they like and what they don’t like. You can make it more difficult by getting them to say items that start with the first letter of their name.
For example: Hi my name is Julie. I like …. Jellies but I don’t like…. Jam.
After everyone has had a chance to say what their likes and dislikes are the students stand in a circle. A volunteer is chosen and he calls out the name of another student across the circle. As he walks towards them he must call their likes and dislikes. The chosen student chooses someone else and walks towards them calling out their likes and dislikes and so on until everyone has had a chance.

For more Drama Games you can use in the classroom, click on the link here.

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.