Posted in Action Poems, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, English as a second language, English teaching games, fables, Fairy Tales, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, the lion and the mouse

The Lion and the Mouse: A fun drama workshop for young children.

The Lion and the Mouse.

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action to the story the lion and the mouse. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action.

Lion: Get down on hands and knees, and move around stealthily as a lion stalking his prey.

Mouse: Scamper like a mouse and squeak.

Forest: Make yourself into a large tree.

Roar/roared/roaring: Roar loudly like a lion.  

Eat: Do a gobbling action.

Help: Extend hands in a kindly gesture.

Narrator: One day, a lion was fast asleep in the forest, his head resting on his paw and he was snoring away. A timid little mouse came scampering by him and accidentally scampered across the lion’s nose. The lion woke up with a loud roar. The lion laid his huge paw angrily on the timid little mouse. He roared, “I’m going to eat you up.”

“Don’t eat me!” begged the poor mouse. “Please let me go and someday I will help you.”

The lion was much amused to think that a mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the mouse go.

Some days later, while walking in the forest, the lion was caught in a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The mouse heard the roar and quickly found the lion trapped in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she chewed it until it fell apart, and soon the lion was free.

“You laughed when I said one day I would help you,” said the mouse. “Now, you see that even a mouse can help a lion.”

They hugged, and from then on, the lion and the mouse were very good friends.

Introduction:

Ask the children to name different jungle animals. They discuss what they can do, what they eat, where they live in the jungle. Then each child chooses their favour it’s jungle animal. The teacher goes around the circle and each child get an opportunity to speak about its favorite jungle animal

My favorite animal is …..

It’s …….

It’s got……..

It lives in………

It eats …….

It moves like………..

Warm up:

Children are running through the ‘jungle’ and run into many animals, etc that they need to get away from. The teacher can give appropriate commands, and the children carry out a suitable action:

jump over logs

duck under branches

high knees through quicksand

run from the tiger

tip toe past the snake

talk to the monkeys (ooh, ooh, aah, aah), etc.

This really gets kids’ hearts pumping and they have a blast!

Main Focus of workshop:

The Lion’s Court: Before starting this game it is a good idea for the teacher to talk about the different animals that are found in the jungle. The teacher should ask the children who is the King of the Jungle? The teacher then assumes the role of a lion who is the King of the Jungle. It would be a good idea to have a crown for the lion. The children can make a court for the lion with chairs and a table or with cushions. Inside the court the lion sits on a throne. Each child chooses an animal they would like to pretend to be. The lion tells the other animals he is looking for animals to join his court. One by one he calls all the animals to him and asks them why he should let them join his court. The child must say what type of animal they are and what good qualities they have and how they will be useful to the lion, the King of the Jungle. When they have finished the King says “you may join my court” and lets them in. This is why it is a good idea to designated area in the jungle.

Dramatic play is a great way to teach important communication skills to children. Jungles hold a fascination for children, and incorporating drama workshop with a jungle theme can be fun for both  teachers and  children  alike. Add music, costumes and props to your dramatic play if possible.

Closure:

Sleeping Lions: All the children are lions (tigers, cows or any animal they want to be). They lie down on the floor; eyes closed and stay still, as if they were sleeping. The teacher goes around the room, trying to get the lions to move. If they move, then they have to get up and help the teacher to try to get the other lions to move. They are not allowed to touch the lions, but may move close to them, tell jokes or pull faces. After five minutes, with a loud roar, tell the lions who are still on the floor to wake up. 

For more drama ideas for young children click on Amazon.com

For more drama activities about Aesop’s Fables, click on the links below.

Aesop’s Fables

The Lion and the Mouse – a rhyming play.

The Lion and the Mouse – a fun movement story

 

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Posted in Action Poems, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Mime, Mime for kids, Movement activities

Emotions -a drama workshop for children based on emotions


Drama is a great way of expressing emotions. Explain to the children everything we do and every thought we have comes with a feeling. Sometimes the feelings feel good and sometimes not so good. Some feelings are strong, some are weak. When we feel something we can choos want to do about that feeling. Sometimes we try to ignore it and it goes away and sometime it takes over and we cannot think of anything else. When you get a feeling, first work out what it is and come up with an idea about what to do about it.

When you are feeling…….
Happy
Angry
Bored
Worried
Sad
Excited
Grumpy
Scared
Quiet
Jealous
Embarrassed
Shy

Everyone makes mask with different emotions. Walk around the trying portray their emotions.
The rest of the class has to get what emotion you are portraying.

 

ACTIVITY: EMOTION ACTION SONG.

The song is a variation on the classic “If You Are Happy, And You Know It.”

When I sing this, I over exaggerate my faces. And I encourage the children to make the faces along with the body language. So often we focus emotion lessons only on faces, but children’s bodies tell us how they are feeling too.

If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you are happy, and you know it, clap your hands.

Now replace happy with different emotions:

Mad – cross your arms.
Frustrated – stomp your feet.
Excited – jump up and down.
Sad – make a frown
Scared – hide your face.

Mirror, Mirror

Pair the children up. One child makes an emotion face and their partner identifies the emotion and duplicates it.

 

For more drama activities for children visit my amazon page.

 

For more free drama activities click below.

Drama workshop for children based on the Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

A Play  script for children – The Frog Prince

Posted in Buddhism stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, The money pig by Hans Christian Andersen, The money pig play, The money pig playscript

The Money Pig – A Play based on the story by Hans Christian Andersen

Characters: One storyteller, Doll, Teddy Bear, Train Set, Colouring Pencil, Toy Car, Money Pig, Aeroplane, Mother.

Storyteller: Once upon a time, there was a nursery that had lots of toys. There was a doll, teddy bear, a toy car, colouring pencil, aeroplane and even a train set.
Doll: Look, at how beautiful I am. (Admires herself in the mirror.)
Teddy Bear: (Sings the lyrics and does the actions.)
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn around!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the ground!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Jump up high!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch the sky!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Bend down low!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Touch your toes!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Turn out the light!
Teddy bear, teddy bear,
Say good night!
Colouring Pencil: I’m such a fabulous colour.
Train set: Choo, choo, all aboard. (He moves around the room and all the toys join him to make a train.)
Doll: What’s that up here? (Points to the top of the cupboard.)
Teddy Bear: Doll, that’s the money box in the shape of a pig.
Toy Car: He lives up there on top of the cupboard
Colouring Pencil: He doesn’t talk or play with any of the other toys in the nursery.
Train Set: He thinks he is way better than us.
Money Pig: I’m by far the best toy in the nursery. I’ve lots of money in my tummy. When I’m full, I can buy any toy in this nursery
Storyteller: One night while the family were sleeping, the doll said…
Doll: Let’s play house.
All toy: (Jump up and down.) Yes let’s.
Doll: What about the Money Pig. Let’s ask him to join us.
Teddy Bear: We will have to write him a letter because he is so high up.
Colouring Pencil: I’ll do it. (Reads out the letter as he writes it.)
Dear Money Pig,
Please join us.
We are playing house.
Lots of love,
From,
All the toys.
Aeroplane come here.
Aeroplane: Yes, colouring Pencil. What can I do for you?
Colouring Pencil: Please deliver this letter to the Money Pig.
Aeroplane: My pleasure.
(Aeroplane flies to the top of cupboard and delivers the letter.)
(Money Pig opens the letter.)
Money Pig: (Shouts down) I’ll join you but I won’t be climbing down to your level. I’m way too important for that.
Doll: We will bring the doll’s house in front of the cupboard
Storyteller 1: The toys took turns to act out different family stories.
(Toys improvise family scenarios.)
Money Pig: This is such a boring game. I’ll just sit here and think of all the money in my tummy.
Doll: Be careful, colouring pencil. You are going to crash into the cupboard.
Colouring Pencil: (Colouring pencil bashes into the cupboard.) Too late. I already have.
(Money pig begins to wobble.)
Money Pig: What’s happening. I’m losing my balance. I’m going to faaaallll.
(He crashes down on to the floor and the money spills everywhere.)
Doll: Oh dear, he is broken, but look at all the money.
Teddy Bear: Quick, someone is coming; back to our places. (All the toys run to their places and freeze.)
Mother: What’s all the noise about? Oh dear, what happened here? The Money Pig must have fallen off the cupboard. I better pick up all the money.
Storyteller: The next day mother came back to the playroom.
Mother: I used the money to buy a brand new Money Pig. (She places the new Money Pig on top of the cupboard.)
For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click here.

 

The 🐸 Prince – A five minute Playscript for children.

The Little Mermaid – A Children’s Play.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Fox and the Crow – A Five Minute Play for Chldren

Characters: Three storytellers, fox, crow, mice, dogs, cows, horses. You can have as many mice, dogs, cows and horses as you wish.
Storyteller 1: One day a crow was out searching for some food.

(Crow is flying around the stage looking for food.)

Storyteller 2: She came across a nice piece of cheese.
(She stops as she spots some cheese and she swoops down to get it.)
Storyteller 3: She grabbed the cheese with her beak and said…
Crow: What a lovely piece of cheese! I will keep it all for myself and not share it with anyone.
Storyteller 1: She flew to the top of the tree.
Storyteller 2: After a while some mice came along. They squeaked…
Mice: Squeak, squeak, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The mice were sad and hungry so they scampered off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then some dogs came along. They barked …
Dogs: Woof, woof, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 2: The dogs were sad and hungry so they bounded off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 3: A few minutes later some cows passed by. They mooed …
Cows: Moo, moo, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 1: The cows were sad and hungry so they walked off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 2: Finally, some horses came along. They neighed …
Horses: Neigh, neigh, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The horses were sad and hungry so they galloped off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then along came a fox. He said to himself…
(Fox faces the audience.)
Fox: That cheese looks delicious and it would be perfect for my breakfast.
Storyteller 2: Then he had an idea.
Fox: Good Morning Crow, you beautiful bird.
Crow: I’m not stupid. I know what you want.
Fox: All I want is to hear you sing. You must be queen of all the birds and your voice must be beautiful. I would love to hear you, but maybe I’m wrong. (The fox turns to leave.)
Storyteller 3: The crow was very flattered.
Crow: Wait Fox, come back. I’ll show you how beautifully I can sing.
Storyteller 1: She opened her mouth and began to caw.
Crow: Caw, Caw, Caw.
Storyteller 2: The cheese fell out of her mouth and onto the ground. The fox picked it up quickly.
Fox: Thanks very much. (He swallows the cheese and licks his lips.) Crow, I tricked you.
Storyteller 3: Off the fox went into the woods looking for another breakfast.
Storytellers: The lesson of this story is beware of people who flatter you.

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.

 

For more plays click on the links below.

The Money Pig

The Ants and the Grasshopper

Chinese New Year

Posted in Action Poems, Drama Activities for children, drama for kids, Drama workshop for childre, English teaching games, Esl, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Body/self awareness Activities

image

Game: Colour Jump

Instructions: Ask the children to look at their clothing. Ask them to notice the colors they are wearing. Tell the children that when you name a color they are wearing, they will jump up and then sit back down. Be sure the children have enough space to move without hurting other children. If your space is limited, they can all stand and then hop when their color is called. Call out one color. Help children by drawing attention to the colors they are wearing. Example: “Mara, is that red on your shirt?”

Game: Alphabet Jump

Instructions: Tell the children that you are going to name a letter of the alphabet. When a child’s name begins with that letter, that child can jump up and then sit back down. Recite the alphabet, and pause when you reach a letter that begins a child’s name. If that child hesitates, repeat the letter and look at the child. You can prompt a child by saying, “B. B. I think Bryan starts with B.” If a child jumps on the wrong letter, say, “Oops, Janna, you jumped to

Game:The Shake it Song

Instructions: As you sing this little song, move your body with the words. (i.e. when you say “shake it high!” shake your arms and head up high. When you say/sing “shake it low”, bend down and shake your body in a low crouched or squat position – a pile for my ballet trained friends!)

SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
Shake it HIGH!
Shake it LOW.
Shake it all about!

(repeat at least 3X)

You can choose to turn around when you sing “Shake it all about” – or you can simply shake your whole body. Allow whatever movement happens freely as you play with your child. Sing the song at least three times. You really want to get into the fun like to end my 3-4 and 5-6 classes with what I call “body awareness freeze game”. So it’s like freeze dance except no one’s out if they move during a freeze moment. Instead, I shout out directions every time the music stops. There are two categories: directions that affect how they move, and directions that will affect the shape they will form with their bodies when the music stops.

For example, I may say: “until the music stops you will make a hand dance” and dance mostly with their hands. Then the music stops and I say “Now you will make a shoulder dance”. etc.
With the other variation, I let them dance however they want, and then I say “Next time the music stops I want you to make straight lines with your arms and legs” and then they do it when the music stops. Then I give them something else “Next time the music stops you have to have one foot and one hand in the air”… It can be anything really, I just want them to be creative and start problem solving with their bodies… When there’s a holiday coming up I ask them to shape their body like a star, like a Christmas tree, or like a heart for valentine’s day. They love it and that way they are still developing skills and body awareness while having crazy loads of fun!

For more movement games and activities, click here.

 

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

Movement Story -Adventure in Space

Posted in Circle games, Closure activities, co-operation, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama

Teach English through Drama Games

cropped-img_0052.jpg

 

Drama games are a perfect tool to use in any classroom that encompasses
multiple learning styles, ability levels and age groups in addition, the activities in this book help ESL students to access active language in an effective and imaginative way. The activities in this
book facilitate students’ ability to learn in different ways as visual learners, auditory learners and kinaesthetic learners. 
Here are a few fun, challenging and rewarding drama games.

 

Game: The Fishing Game
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The focus of this game is to practice directions. It will also help students to become familiar with different types of fish.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: The students sit in a circle. The teacher goes around circle and gives each student a fish name such as a dog fish, sun fish, star fish, and cat fish. Then, the teacher chooses one type of fish and the students that are assigned that fish move around the outside of the circle to instructions like high seas- stretching as high as they can, low seas- crouching as low as they can, choppy seas- jumping or hopping, change direction, and then when the teacher calls ‘shark is coming’ they must run back as quickly as they can to their place in the circle. Repeat until all the fish have got a chance.

Game: World’s Greatest Sandwich
Level: Elementary
Other benefits: This is an excellent concentration and memory game. It will help to extend and explore vocabulary.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: This is an activity can be used as a getting to know you activity as well as giving the students an opportunity to practice specific vocabulary. The students sit in a circle the first-person starts.
Student A: Hi my name is Adam and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs in it.
Student B: Hi my name is Betty and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs and bananas in it.
Student C: Hi my name is Carol and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs, bananas and pickles in it
Everyone in the circle gets a chance. If they make a mistake or pause too long they are out. The game keeps going until there is only one person left.
Extension: This game could be used to practice other types of vocabulary.
Examples:
• The world greatest zoo has …………. (zoo)
• The world’s greatest rainbow has ………… (colours)
• The world greatest orchestra has ………… (musical instruments)

Game: I Like but I don’t Like
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This game helps to promote the students’ creativity. It also focuses on negatives.
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Go around the circle and each student says what they like and what they don’t like. You can make it more difficult by getting them to say items that start with the first letter of their name.
For example: Hi my name is Julie. I like …. Jellies but I don’t like…. Jam.
After everyone has had a chance to say what their likes and dislikes are the students stand in a circle. A volunteer is chosen and he calls out the name of another student across the circle. As he walks towards them he must call their likes and dislikes. The chosen student chooses someone else and walks towards them calling out their likes and dislikes and so on until everyone has had a chance.

For more Drama Games you can use in the classroom, click on the link here.

 

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

 

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Hans Christian Andersen, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Snow White, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Enormous Turnip, The Little Mermaid, The three billy goats gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

goldilocks
Characters: Three storytellers, Goldilocks, three bears, three bowls, three chairs, three beds.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a little house in the woods.
Storyteller 2: There was Daddy Bear, there was Mummy Bear and there was Baby Bear.
Storyteller 3: One fine day, they decided to go for a walk.
Daddy Bear: What a lovely sunny day it is today. Let’s all go to the woods.
Baby Bear: I’m hungry. I want to eat my porridge.
Mummy Bear: The porridge is still hot; it will be cool enough by the time we come back from our walk.
Storyteller 1: So, off they went on their walk.
Storyteller 2: Just then, a little girl called Goldilocks was walking in the woods.
Storyteller 3: She was picking flowers for her grandma.
Storyteller 1: She stopped suddenly and saw a pretty little house.
Goldilocks: Oh, what a pretty little house. I am feeling a little tired and hungry. I wonder if whoever lives here will let me rest for a few moments and give me something to eat (She knocks on the door.) There is no answer…. (She opens the door slowly and goes inside.)
Goldilocks: Oh look, three bowls of porridge.
Bowl 1: Eat me! I have lots of salt on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too salty.
Bowl 2: I have lots of sugar on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too sugary.
Bowl 3: Eat me! I’m just right. (Goldilocks eats some and likes it and continues eating it until all the porridge is gone.)
Goldilocks: Mmmmmm, that was just right. Oh look, three chairs. I think I’ll sit down for a moment.
Chair 1: Sit on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too hard.
Chair 2: Sit on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too soft.
Chair 3: Sit on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and makes herself comfortable.)
Goldilocks: This chair is just right. Oh dear, I’ve broken the chair.
Storyteller 2: Goldilocks decided to walk upstairs.
Storyteller 3: She saw three beds.
Bed 1: Lie on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too hard.
Bed 2: Lie on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too soft.
Bed 3: Lie on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and stays there.)
Goldilocks: This bed is just right.
Storyteller 1: Goldilocks fell fast asleep.
Storyteller 2: After a while, the three bears came back from their walk.
Storyteller 3: They walked in to the house and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been eating my porridge? Look, it is all gone!
Storyteller 3: They saw the chairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair? Look, it’s broken!
Storyteller 3: They walked upstairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed? And look, she is still there!
Storyteller 3: Goldilocks woke and screamed.
Storyteller 1: She jumped out of bed and ran down the stairs and out of the house.
Storyteller 2: The three bears never saw her again
Storytellers: The end.

For more play scripts based on Fairytales, click here.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Workshop for children.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

 

 

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama strategies, Elements of Drama, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Getting to know you games

Back to school “Getting to Know you Games”

Group Of Children With Teacher Enjoying Drama Class Together

Game: Data Processing
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The main aim of this activity is to provide the students
with the opportunity to ask each other personal questions. The game can
also be used to develop listening skills.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Get the class to work together and get them to get into a
straight line:
• Alphabetically by their first name
• Alphabetically by their surnames
• Alphabetically by their best friend’s name
• By hair length
• By shoe size
• By birthdays
• By how many brothers and sisters you have
Extension: If the students are more advanced, get them to do this exercise
by not using sound. They can only use body movements and gestures.

Game: Action Name Game
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This is another effective but simple game to practice
greetings and introductions. It also promotes awareness and teamwork
skills.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Have everyone sit in circle. The first student says, “Hi
my name is ____” The student then does an action, and the rest of the
group says, “Hi _____, pleased to meet you,” and repeats the action.
This continues until everyone has a chance and the rest of the group has
greeted them and repeated their action.

Game: Adjective Introduction
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This is a good game for both learning classmates’ names
and practising adjectives.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space, ball or a bean bag.
Instructions: The students form a circle and the teacher gives one of
them a bean bag or a ball. When they have the ball/beanbag, they must
introduce themselves and say an adjective that best describes them, for
example “Hi, my name is Annie and I’m funny.” When Annie is finished
introducing herself, she throws the ball to someone else in the circle. This
continues until everyone has had a turn.
Extension: To make this activity more difficult for more advanced
students, the adjective they choose must start with the same letter as their

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Closure activities, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Movement activities, Relaxation games

Action Songs and Poetry for preschoolers.

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Dingle Dangle Scarecrow
When all the cows were sleeping and the sun had gone to bed
Up jumped the scarecrow and this is what he said
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.
When all the hens were rousting and the moon behind a cloud,
Up jumped the scarecrow and shouted very loud
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.

Do Your Ears Hang Low?
Do your ears hang low? Do they wobble to and fro?
Can you tie them in a knot? Can you tie them in a bow?
Can you throw them o’er your shoulder like a continental soldier?
Do your ears hang low?
Do your ears hang high? Do they reach up to the sky?
Do they droop when they are wet? Do they stiffen when they’re dry?
Can you semaphore your neighbour with a minimum of labour?
Do your ears hang high?
Do your ears flip-flop? Can you use them for a mop?
Are they stringy at the bottom? Are they curly at the top?
Can you use them for a swatter? Can you use them for a blotter?
Do your ears flip-flop? Do your ears hang out? Can you waggle them about?
Can you flip them up and down as you fly around the town?
Can you shut them up for sure when you hear an awful bore?
Do your ears hang out?

The Hokey Cokey
You put your right hand in
Your right hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
Chorus
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Knees bent, arms stretched, rah, rah, rah!
(Chorus)
You put your left hand in
Your left hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your right foot in
Your right foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your left foot in
Your left foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your whole self in
Your whole self out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.

Little Bunny Foo Foo

Hoppin through the forest

Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head.

Down came
The good fairy
And the
Good fairy said:

“Little bunny foo foo
I don’t wanna see you
Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head!”

“I’m gonna give you
Three chances
Then I’ll turn you
Into a goon!”

Little bunny foofoo
Hoppin’ through the forest
Scoopin’ up the field mice and bopping
Em’ on the head

Down came the good fairy
And she said:

” little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you
Scooping up the field mice and bopping em’ on the head
I’ll give you two more chances then I’ll turn you to a goon”
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin’ through the forest scooping up the field
and boppin’ em’ on the the head

Then the good fairy came down
And she said

Little bunny foofoo i don’t want to see you scooping up the field
much and bopping them on the head!I’ll give you one more chance
and then I’ll turn you into a goon!
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin through the forest scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head

Then the good fairy came down and she said:

Little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head I gave you 3 chances and I’m
going to turn you into a goon!

POOF!

For more movement games and activities, click here.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Nursery Rhymes

Circle Time Activities for preschoolers

girls in classroom

Quiet Mouse, Still Mouse. Children sit in a circle as the leader announces which child (eventually, you hope, all of them) has become a mouse by being very quiet and still.
Alphabet Shopping. Using the first letter, match the child’s name with something to buy that begins with that letter. For example, “My name is Connor and I will buy a coat.” This facilitates teaching categories and organizational skills by using alphabet animals, foods and places.

Storm Leader starts by wiggling fingers for the rain, this passes around the circle until everyone is wiggling their fingers. The leader then changes the action to other aspects of the storm, e.g. wind – arms waving, thunder – slap knees. End with the sun – mime a circle.

Weather and calander of the day.– Start the day off by asking what is the weather like outside or what day is it. Find some visual aids or printables that show days of the week or months of the year or weather symbols to help you talk about these things.

 

For more drama games for preschoolers click on the link below.