Posted in Action Poems, creative arts, Drama for children, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Body/self awareness Activities

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Game: Colour Jump

Instructions: Ask the children to look at their clothing. Ask them to notice the colors they are wearing. Tell the children that when you name a color they are wearing, they will jump up and then sit back down. Be sure the children have enough space to move without hurting other children. If your space is limited, they can all stand and then hop when their color is called. Call out one color. Help children by drawing attention to the colors they are wearing. Example: “Mara, is that red on your shirt?”

Game: Alphabet Jump

Instructions: Tell the children that you are going to name a letter of the alphabet. When a child’s name begins with that letter, that child can jump up and then sit back down. Recite the alphabet, and pause when you reach a letter that begins a child’s name. If that child hesitates, repeat the letter and look at the child. You can prompt a child by saying, “B. B. I think Bryan starts with B.” If a child jumps on the wrong letter, say, “Oops, Janna, you jumped to

Game:The Shake it Song

Instructions: As you sing this little song, move your body with the words. (i.e. when you say “shake it high!” shake your arms and head up high. When you say/sing “shake it low”, bend down and shake your body in a low crouched or squat position – a pile for my ballet trained friends!)

SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
Shake it HIGH!
Shake it LOW.
Shake it all about!

(repeat at least 3X)

You can choose to turn around when you sing “Shake it all about” – or you can simply shake your whole body. Allow whatever movement happens freely as you play with your child. Sing the song at least three times. You really want to get into the fun like to end my 3-4 and 5-6 classes with what I call “body awareness freeze game”. So it’s like freeze dance except no one’s out if they move during a freeze moment. Instead, I shout out directions every time the music stops. There are two categories: directions that affect how they move, and directions that will affect the shape they will form with their bodies when the music stops.

For example, I may say: “until the music stops you will make a hand dance” and dance mostly with their hands. Then the music stops and I say “Now you will make a shoulder dance”. etc.
With the other variation, I let them dance however they want, and then I say “Next time the music stops I want you to make straight lines with your arms and legs” and then they do it when the music stops. Then I give them something else “Next time the music stops you have to have one foot and one hand in the air”… It can be anything really, I just want them to be creative and start problem solving with their bodies… When there’s a holiday coming up I ask them to shape their body like a star, like a Christmas tree, or like a heart for valentine’s day. They love it and that way they are still developing skills and body awareness while having crazy loads of fun!

 

 

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Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years

The Tortoise and the Eagle

Characters: Two storytellers, tortoise, eagle, snail, squirrel, rabbit, crow, dove, robin.

Storyteller 1: There once was a tortoise that lived in a wood.

Storyteller 2: He was never happy.

Tortoise: I’m so bored. All I do all day is plod along. If only I could fly like the birds up in the sky.

(Birds come on stage and fly around. The tortoise looks at them with envy.)

Snail: Tortoise, why are you never happy. You have lots of things to be grateful for.

Tortoise: Like what?

Snail: You have a big hard shell.

Squirrel: You have lots of friends in the woods.

Rabbit: None of us can fly and we are not bored.

Storyteller 1: The tortoise sighed and said…

Tortoise: I don’t like being stuck on the ground. I think, I will ask the birds to help me. Birds, birds, could one of you take me up into the sky so I can see the wonders of the world.

(The crow flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Crow, crow, please help me fly.

Crow: No, I will not help you fly. You are too heavy. (Crow flies off.)

(Dove flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Dove, dove, please help me fly.

Dove: No I will not help you fly. You have no feathers, you aren’t meant to fly. (Dove flies away.)

(Robin flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Robin, robin, please help me fly.

Robin: No, I will not help you fly. It is too dangerous. (Robin flies away.)

(Eagle flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Eagle, eagle, please help me fly.

Eagle: I will help you fly.

(The eagle picks up the tortoise with his talons and starts to fly.)

Storyteller 2: The tortoise was so frightened he closed his eyes really tightly.

Eagle: Tortoise, you must open your eyes if you want to see the wonders of the world.

Tortoise: I can’t open my eyes. I’m too scared. Eagle, please put me down.

(The eagle puts the tortoise down and flies off. The tortoise starts crying.)

Storytellers: The moral of the story is be careful what you wish for.

For more fun plays based on the Panchatantra, Click Here!

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Aesop’s Fables

llta_lion_angry_mouse
About Aesop:
Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller who was is believed to have lived around 500 B.C. He was a Phrygian slave. He was owned by two different masters before gaining his freedom due to his intelligence. He went from place to place telling his fables to the masses however it is also widely believed that he did not write most of them, he just collected them. Aesop’s fables were used to offer advice to their audience. He supposedly met his death by being thrown a cliff at Delphi for being ugly and deformed. Over the centuries Aesop’s fables have been rewritten, illustrated and translated into every language in the world.

About Fables:
A fable is a short story. Fables typically involve animals with human like qualities. Usually in a fable, the time and the place are unspecified. Often fables illustrate how smaller and weaker characters use their intelligence to defeat the bigger and more powerful characters. There is always a hero, a villain, a character with a weakness and most importantly a moral. A moral is a lifelong lesson.

The most common characters found in fables are:
Rabbit
Fox
Crow
Bear
Rooster
Duck
Pig
Eagle
Hen
Wolf
Monkey
Donkey
Mouse
Rat
Cow
Goose
Lion
Boy
Girl.

There are always good characters and evil characters.
Examples of good characters:

Mouse
Kitten
Bunny
Cow.
Examples of evil characters:
Snake
Lion
Rat
Bear.

Write your own fable:

Title:

Characters:
Hero:

Villain:

Character with a weakness:


Setting:


Problem:


Solution:


Trickery:


Moral:

The Lion and Mouse

A Lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little Mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the Lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her.

“Spare me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will surely repay you.”

The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.

Some days later, while stalking his prey in the forest, the Lion was caught in the toils of a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse knew the voice and quickly found the Lion struggling in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she gnawed it until it parted, and soon the Lion was free.

“You laughed when I said I would repay you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”

“A kindness is never wasted”

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Hans Christian Andersen, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Snow White, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Enormous Turnip, The Little Mermaid, The three billy goats gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

goldilocks
Characters: Three storytellers, Goldilocks, three bears, three bowls, three chairs, three beds.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a little house in the woods.
Storyteller 2: There was Daddy Bear, there was Mummy Bear and there was Baby Bear.
Storyteller 3: One fine day, they decided to go for a walk.
Daddy Bear: What a lovely sunny day it is today. Let’s all go to the woods.
Baby Bear: I’m hungry. I want to eat my porridge.
Mummy Bear: The porridge is still hot; it will be cool enough by the time we come back from our walk.
Storyteller 1: So, off they went on their walk.
Storyteller 2: Just then, a little girl called Goldilocks was walking in the woods.
Storyteller 3: She was picking flowers for her grandma.
Storyteller 1: She stopped suddenly and saw a pretty little house.
Goldilocks: Oh, what a pretty little house. I am feeling a little tired and hungry. I wonder if whoever lives here will let me rest for a few moments and give me something to eat (She knocks on the door.) There is no answer…. (She opens the door slowly and goes inside.)
Goldilocks: Oh look, three bowls of porridge.
Bowl 1: Eat me! I have lots of salt on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too salty.
Bowl 2: I have lots of sugar on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too sugary.
Bowl 3: Eat me! I’m just right. (Goldilocks eats some and likes it and continues eating it until all the porridge is gone.)
Goldilocks: Mmmmmm, that was just right. Oh look, three chairs. I think I’ll sit down for a moment.
Chair 1: Sit on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too hard.
Chair 2: Sit on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too soft.
Chair 3: Sit on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and makes herself comfortable.)
Goldilocks: This chair is just right. Oh dear, I’ve broken the chair.
Storyteller 2: Goldilocks decided to walk upstairs.
Storyteller 3: She saw three beds.
Bed 1: Lie on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too hard.
Bed 2: Lie on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too soft.
Bed 3: Lie on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and stays there.)
Goldilocks: This bed is just right.
Storyteller 1: Goldilocks fell fast asleep.
Storyteller 2: After a while, the three bears came back from their walk.
Storyteller 3: They walked in to the house and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been eating my porridge? Look, it is all gone!
Storyteller 3: They saw the chairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair? Look, it’s broken!
Storyteller 3: They walked upstairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed? And look, she is still there!
Storyteller 3: Goldilocks woke and screamed.
Storyteller 1: She jumped out of bed and ran down the stairs and out of the house.
Storyteller 2: The three bears never saw her again
Storytellers: The end.

For more play scripts based on Fairytales, click on the link below.

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts

Drama Activities for ESL Students



Game: The Dog Show 

Level: Pre Intermediate +

Aim: Questions

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear Space

Instructions: This is a communication activity where the students have to use their imagination. There is an opportunity for the students to use mime and provides a chance to use the teacher in role drama technique. Get each student to imagine that they are a dog owner. They must each mime interacting with their dog. Once they have done this and got use to the size of their dog get them to imagine that they are competing in a dog show. The teacher takes on the role as a judge of the show. She/he interviews each of the dog owners individually and ask them the following questions.

What type of dog is it?

Where did you get him from?

What type of personality does he have?

What dog tricks can he do? Can you show us?

Why should you dog win the show?

The Judge/teacher can decide at the end of the activity who wins the show. The winner/winners can take a photo at the end with their dogs. (Still image).

Game: Alibi

Level: Pre intermediate +

Aim: To ask questions and to communicate in a spontaneous manner.

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: A clear space.

Instructions: Explain what an alibi means. Create a crime scene scenario.
Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. Get one group to be the suspect send them out of the room to get their story straight. Meanwhile the suspects are getting their story straight. Get the other group to be the investigators to compile a series of questions. After the students are finished preparing invite the suspect back and the interrogation begins. Each group interviews each suspect and then they compare notes and decide whose story didn’t match up and they must come to a consensus who they will officially excuse.

Different scenarios

Bank robbery

Kidnapping

Shop lifting

Extension: More advanced students could hold a trial in which each group could be assigned different roles.

Posted in Animal Stories, Christmas plays, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Hot seating, Mime for children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, teacher in role, The Gruffalo, The Gruffalo drama workshop, Voice Production

The Gruffalo – Drama Workshop

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, co-operation, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Hot seating, Mime, Movement stories for children, Panchatantra plays, Still image, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, teacher in role, The three billy goats gruff

Using drama strategies in the classroom