Posted in Action Poems, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A drama workshop for children

 

Warm up – Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices
Who has been sitting in my chair?
Who has eating my porridge?
Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:
Loud
Quiet
Fast
Slow
Sad
Happy
Angry
Excited
Surprised
Frightened
Annoyed

“Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….
Walk as
Daddy bear
Mummy bear
Baby bear
Goldilocks
Grumpy daddy bear
Kind mummy bear
Happy baby bear
Surprised Goldilocks”.

Main Focus:
Read the movement story Goldilocks and the three bears. Click on the link.

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

When Goldilocks went to the house of the Bears – movement poetry. Click on the link below.

Action Poems for Young Children – Movement

Closure: In groups of 4 make a still image of your favorite scene. Present your still image to the rest of the class.

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Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

 

 

Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click on the link below:

 

Posted in Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Plays, Plays for Children, St Patrick

St Patrick’s Day Drama Activities

 

Game: Rainbow
Age: 4 years+
Minimum number of participants: 7
Resources needed: Clear space and a chair for each student – if you do not have chairs you can use sheets of paper or cushions.
Other Benefits: This is a well-known game which can also be used very effectively as a listening game or an observation game.
Instructions: All the children sit in circle on a chair or a cushion. The teacher chooses three or more different colours of the rainbow – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet and goes around the circle giving each person the name of a colour in a particular order, for example, red, orange, yellow. A child is then chosen, or volunteers, to go into the centre of the circle. His/Her chair is taken away. The child in the centre calls out the name of one of the three colours.. If the child in the centre says red then all the reds change place, if s/he says yellow, all the yellows change place and if s/he says orange, all the oranges change places. If s/he says rainbow then everyone changes places. The child who is left without a chair goes into the centre for the next round.

Game: What’s the time Mr. Leprechaun ?
Age: 3 years+
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This is a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening and co-ordination skills.
Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Leprechaun and stands at one side of the clear space. His/Her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Leprechaun ?” The leprechaun does not turn around. He/she replies in a leprechaun like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the leprechaun calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Leprechaun ?” The leprechaun replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate amount of steps forward. Eventually, when the leprechaun thinks that the children are near enough he/she will say: “Dinnertime!” Then the leprechaun turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Leprechaun catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the wolf in the next game.

Game: Colours of the Rainbow
Age: 4 years+
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This game helps the child hone their observation skills but it can also be used as a fun warm up or movement activity.
Instructions: The teacher calls out a colour of the rainbow, for example blue. The children must then look for an object in the clear space that is blue. All the children must run to the blue object. The last person to get there is out.

Game: Leprechaun’s underpants
Age: 5 years+
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Other Benefits: This helps to improve eye contact and children body language. It also stimulates the imagination as the children have to come up with unique questions.
Instructions: The children sit in a circle. One child sits in the middle of the circle and everyone in the circle takes it in turns to ask him/her a question, for example: “What did you have for breakfast?” The child in the middle is only allowed to answer “Leprechaun underpants’ and they must not laugh or smile. If they laugh or smile they have to change places with the child whose question made them laugh.

If you want a copy of Irish Legends on Stage click the link below.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Aesop’s Fables

llta_lion_angry_mouse
About Aesop:
Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller who was is believed to have lived around 500 B.C. He was a Phrygian slave. He was owned by two different masters before gaining his freedom due to his intelligence. He went from place to place telling his fables to the masses however it is also widely believed that he did not write most of them, he just collected them. Aesop’s fables were used to offer advice to their audience. He supposedly met his death by being thrown a cliff at Delphi for being ugly and deformed. Over the centuries Aesop’s fables have been rewritten, illustrated and translated into every language in the world.

About Fables:
A fable is a short story. Fables typically involve animals with human like qualities. Usually in a fable, the time and the place are unspecified. Often fables illustrate how smaller and weaker characters use their intelligence to defeat the bigger and more powerful characters. There is always a hero, a villain, a character with a weakness and most importantly a moral. A moral is a lifelong lesson.

The most common characters found in fables are:
Rabbit
Fox
Crow
Bear
Rooster
Duck
Pig
Eagle
Hen
Wolf
Monkey
Donkey
Mouse
Rat
Cow
Goose
Lion
Boy
Girl.

There are always good characters and evil characters.
Examples of good characters:

Mouse
Kitten
Bunny
Cow.
Examples of evil characters:
Snake
Lion
Rat
Bear.

Write your own fable:

Title:

Characters:
Hero:

Villain:

Character with a weakness:


Setting:


Problem:


Solution:


Trickery:


Moral:

The Lion and Mouse

A Lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little Mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the Lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her.

“Spare me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will surely repay you.”

The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.

Some days later, while stalking his prey in the forest, the Lion was caught in the toils of a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse knew the voice and quickly found the Lion struggling in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she gnawed it until it parted, and soon the Lion was free.

“You laughed when I said I would repay you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”

“A kindness is never wasted”

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Hans Christian Andersen, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Snow White, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Enormous Turnip, The Little Mermaid, The three billy goats gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

goldilocks
Characters: Three storytellers, Goldilocks, three bears, three bowls, three chairs, three beds.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a little house in the woods.
Storyteller 2: There was Daddy Bear, there was Mummy Bear and there was Baby Bear.
Storyteller 3: One fine day, they decided to go for a walk.
Daddy Bear: What a lovely sunny day it is today. Let’s all go to the woods.
Baby Bear: I’m hungry. I want to eat my porridge.
Mummy Bear: The porridge is still hot; it will be cool enough by the time we come back from our walk.
Storyteller 1: So, off they went on their walk.
Storyteller 2: Just then, a little girl called Goldilocks was walking in the woods.
Storyteller 3: She was picking flowers for her grandma.
Storyteller 1: She stopped suddenly and saw a pretty little house.
Goldilocks: Oh, what a pretty little house. I am feeling a little tired and hungry. I wonder if whoever lives here will let me rest for a few moments and give me something to eat (She knocks on the door.) There is no answer…. (She opens the door slowly and goes inside.)
Goldilocks: Oh look, three bowls of porridge.
Bowl 1: Eat me! I have lots of salt on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too salty.
Bowl 2: I have lots of sugar on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too sugary.
Bowl 3: Eat me! I’m just right. (Goldilocks eats some and likes it and continues eating it until all the porridge is gone.)
Goldilocks: Mmmmmm, that was just right. Oh look, three chairs. I think I’ll sit down for a moment.
Chair 1: Sit on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too hard.
Chair 2: Sit on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too soft.
Chair 3: Sit on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and makes herself comfortable.)
Goldilocks: This chair is just right. Oh dear, I’ve broken the chair.
Storyteller 2: Goldilocks decided to walk upstairs.
Storyteller 3: She saw three beds.
Bed 1: Lie on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too hard.
Bed 2: Lie on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too soft.
Bed 3: Lie on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and stays there.)
Goldilocks: This bed is just right.
Storyteller 1: Goldilocks fell fast asleep.
Storyteller 2: After a while, the three bears came back from their walk.
Storyteller 3: They walked in to the house and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been eating my porridge? Look, it is all gone!
Storyteller 3: They saw the chairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair? Look, it’s broken!
Storyteller 3: They walked upstairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed? And look, she is still there!
Storyteller 3: Goldilocks woke and screamed.
Storyteller 1: She jumped out of bed and ran down the stairs and out of the house.
Storyteller 2: The three bears never saw her again
Storytellers: The end.

For more play scripts based on Fairytales, click on the link below.

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts

Drama Activities for ESL Students



Game: The Dog Show 

Level: Pre Intermediate +

Aim: Questions

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear Space

Instructions: This is a communication activity where the students have to use their imagination. There is an opportunity for the students to use mime and provides a chance to use the teacher in role drama technique. Get each student to imagine that they are a dog owner. They must each mime interacting with their dog. Once they have done this and got use to the size of their dog get them to imagine that they are competing in a dog show. The teacher takes on the role as a judge of the show. She/he interviews each of the dog owners individually and ask them the following questions.

What type of dog is it?

Where did you get him from?

What type of personality does he have?

What dog tricks can he do? Can you show us?

Why should you dog win the show?

The Judge/teacher can decide at the end of the activity who wins the show. The winner/winners can take a photo at the end with their dogs. (Still image).

Game: Alibi

Level: Pre intermediate +

Aim: To ask questions and to communicate in a spontaneous manner.

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: A clear space.

Instructions: Explain what an alibi means. Create a crime scene scenario.
Divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. Get one group to be the suspect send them out of the room to get their story straight. Meanwhile the suspects are getting their story straight. Get the other group to be the investigators to compile a series of questions. After the students are finished preparing invite the suspect back and the interrogation begins. Each group interviews each suspect and then they compare notes and decide whose story didn’t match up and they must come to a consensus who they will officially excuse.

Different scenarios

Bank robbery

Kidnapping

Shop lifting

Extension: More advanced students could hold a trial in which each group could be assigned different roles.

Posted in Animal Stories, Christmas plays, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Hot seating, Mime for children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, teacher in role, The Gruffalo, The Gruffalo drama workshop, Voice Production

The Gruffalo – Drama Workshop

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, co-operation, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, Endings, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Hot seating, Mime, Movement stories for children, Panchatantra plays, Still image, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, teacher in role, The three billy goats gruff

Using drama strategies in the classroom