Posted in Action Poems, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, English as a second language, English teaching games, fables, Fairy Tales, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, the lion and the mouse

The Lion and the Mouse: A fun drama workshop for young children.

The Lion and the Mouse.

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action to the story the lion and the mouse. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action.

Lion: Get down on hands and knees, and move around stealthily as a lion stalking his prey.

Mouse: Scamper like a mouse and squeak.

Forest: Make yourself into a large tree.

Roar/roared/roaring: Roar loudly like a lion.  

Eat: Do a gobbling action.

Help: Extend hands in a kindly gesture.

Narrator: One day, a lion was fast asleep in the forest, his head resting on his paw and he was snoring away. A timid little mouse came scampering by him and accidentally scampered across the lion’s nose. The lion woke up with a loud roar. The lion laid his huge paw angrily on the timid little mouse. He roared, “I’m going to eat you up.”

“Don’t eat me!” begged the poor mouse. “Please let me go and someday I will help you.”

The lion was much amused to think that a mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the mouse go.

Some days later, while walking in the forest, the lion was caught in a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The mouse heard the roar and quickly found the lion trapped in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she chewed it until it fell apart, and soon the lion was free.

“You laughed when I said one day I would help you,” said the mouse. “Now, you see that even a mouse can help a lion.”

They hugged, and from then on, the lion and the mouse were very good friends.

Introduction:

Ask the children to name different jungle animals. They discuss what they can do, what they eat, where they live in the jungle. Then each child chooses their favour it’s jungle animal. The teacher goes around the circle and each child get an opportunity to speak about its favorite jungle animal

My favorite animal is …..

It’s …….

It’s got……..

It lives in………

It eats …….

It moves like………..

Warm up:

Children are running through the ‘jungle’ and run into many animals, etc that they need to get away from. The teacher can give appropriate commands, and the children carry out a suitable action:

jump over logs

duck under branches

high knees through quicksand

run from the tiger

tip toe past the snake

talk to the monkeys (ooh, ooh, aah, aah), etc.

This really gets kids’ hearts pumping and they have a blast!

Main Focus of workshop:

The Lion’s Court: Before starting this game it is a good idea for the teacher to talk about the different animals that are found in the jungle. The teacher should ask the children who is the King of the Jungle? The teacher then assumes the role of a lion who is the King of the Jungle. It would be a good idea to have a crown for the lion. The children can make a court for the lion with chairs and a table or with cushions. Inside the court the lion sits on a throne. Each child chooses an animal they would like to pretend to be. The lion tells the other animals he is looking for animals to join his court. One by one he calls all the animals to him and asks them why he should let them join his court. The child must say what type of animal they are and what good qualities they have and how they will be useful to the lion, the King of the Jungle. When they have finished the King says “you may join my court” and lets them in. This is why it is a good idea to designated area in the jungle.

Dramatic play is a great way to teach important communication skills to children. Jungles hold a fascination for children, and incorporating drama workshop with a jungle theme can be fun for both  teachers and  children  alike. Add music, costumes and props to your dramatic play if possible.

Closure:

Sleeping Lions: All the children are lions (tigers, cows or any animal they want to be). They lie down on the floor; eyes closed and stay still, as if they were sleeping. The teacher goes around the room, trying to get the lions to move. If they move, then they have to get up and help the teacher to try to get the other lions to move. They are not allowed to touch the lions, but may move close to them, tell jokes or pull faces. After five minutes, with a loud roar, tell the lions who are still on the floor to wake up. 

For more drama ideas for young children click on Amazon.com

For more drama activities about Aesop’s Fables, click on the links below.

Aesop’s Fables

The Lion and the Mouse – a rhyming play.

The Lion and the Mouse – a fun movement story

 

 

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Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Aesop’s Fables

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About Aesop:
Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller who was is believed to have lived around 500 B.C. He was a Phrygian slave. He was owned by two different masters before gaining his freedom due to his intelligence. He went from place to place telling his fables to the masses however it is also widely believed that he did not write most of them, he just collected them. Aesop’s fables were used to offer advice to their audience. He supposedly met his death by being thrown a cliff at Delphi for being ugly and deformed. Over the centuries Aesop’s fables have been rewritten, illustrated and translated into every language in the world.

About Fables:
A fable is a short story. Fables typically involve animals with human like qualities. Usually in a fable, the time and the place are unspecified. Often fables illustrate how smaller and weaker characters use their intelligence to defeat the bigger and more powerful characters. There is always a hero, a villain, a character with a weakness and most importantly a moral. A moral is a lifelong lesson.

The most common characters found in fables are:
Rabbit
Fox
Crow
Bear
Rooster
Duck
Pig
Eagle
Hen
Wolf
Monkey
Donkey
Mouse
Rat
Cow
Goose
Lion
Boy
Girl.

There are always good characters and evil characters.
Examples of good characters:

Mouse
Kitten
Bunny
Cow.
Examples of evil characters:
Snake
Lion
Rat
Bear.

Write your own fable:

Title:

Characters:
Hero:

Villain:

Character with a weakness:


Setting:


Problem:


Solution:


Trickery:


Moral:

The Lion and Mouse

A Lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little Mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the Lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her.

“Spare me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will surely repay you.”

The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.

Some days later, while stalking his prey in the forest, the Lion was caught in the toils of a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse knew the voice and quickly found the Lion struggling in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she gnawed it until it parted, and soon the Lion was free.

“You laughed when I said I would repay you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”

“A kindness is never wasted”

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.

The lion and the mouse – a drama workshop for children.

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl, expressive arts, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Rhyming Tales – The Lion and the Mouse

A king lion and a mouse under the tree

Rhyming Tales
The following poem can be used in a variety of ways: The practionner could read it at story time or the children could act out or mime the different parts for fun or in front of an audience. They could also be recited. Each child could learn four lines each and they could recite it as a choral piece. These stories help children with their vocal expression and give them an understanding of rhythm.

The Lion and the Mouse
There was a lion who lived in a cave.
He was extremely big and terribly brave.
The lion was not frightened of anything
Because he was the fearsome jungle king.
One day he was asleep near his house
When he was woken by a little mouse.
The lion grabbed the mouse with his large paw
He licked his lips and opened his wide jaw.-
The little mouse looked at him with sheer dread –
He didn’t want to be some scrumptious spread. –
“Squeak, squeak, Mr. Lion do not eat me
Some day I will help you so let me be.”
“You help me,” he said “I don’t think so
But I’m not that hungry, so off you go.”
One day while hunting deep in the jungle
The lion tripped over and took a tumble.
Suddenly he was stuck in an evil trap
The other animals began to clap.
He saw some grey elephants and he cried:
“Elephants, please help me I’ve swallowed my pride.”
“Oh Mr. Lion we will not help you
So how does it feel to be in a stew?”
The elephants said with extreme delight
And off they trundled into the dark night.
The lion waited and a few hours passed
Then out of the blue he saw some giraffes
“Giraffes, Giraffes,” he said, “please, please help me.”
The Giraffes looked at him and decided to flee.
He was extremely hungry and very cold
He was terribly tired and feeling less bold.
When all of a sudden down by the lake
He heard the hissing of a slimy snake.
“Snake, please, please help me I’m stuck in a trap,
I feel confused and I’m all in a flap.”
The snake hissed: “Jungle King I must admit,
You really do look like a proper twit.”
Snake laughed and laughed and felt real good
And away he slithered into the deep wood.
The Lion felt a sense of despair’
He was stuck outside in the cold night air.
Then all of a sudden out from his house
Came the patter of the little brown mouse.
“Pardon Lion I’m not one for prying
But please tell me why you are crying?”
The lion told the mouse his whole story
In all its wondrous gruesome glory.
The little mouse began to gnaw and gnaw
The scary lion sat there full of great awe.
At last, the lion roared: “I’m FREE I’m free.”
With that he invited the mouse home for tea.

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, the lion and the mouse

The Lion and the Mouse – A fun, simple movement story for children.

A king lion and a mouse under the tree

Read the following story. When the children hear the following words they must do the actions.
Lion: Get down on hands and knees and move around stealthily as a lion stalking his prey.
Mouse: Scamper like a mouse and squeak.
Forest: Make yourself into a large tree.
Roar/roared/roaring: Everyone roar as loud as you can.
Eat: Do a gobbling action.
Help: Extend hands in a kindly gesture.

One day a lion was fast asleep in the forest, his head resting on his paw and he was snoring away. A timid little Mouse came scampering by him and accidentally scampered across the Lion’s nose. The Lion woke up with a loud roar. The Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the timid little mouse. He roared “I’m going to eat you up.
“Don’t eat me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will help you.”
The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.
Some days later, while walking in the forest, the Lion was caught in a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse heard the roar and quickly found the Lion trapped in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she chewed it until it fell apart and soon the Lion was free.
“You laughed when I said one day I would help you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”
They hugged and from then on they were very good friends.

For more movement stories click on the link below.

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, The ant and the grasshoppers, The Hare and the Tortoise, the lion and the mouse

The Ants and the Grasshoppers – A 5 minute play script for children.

Ant and Grasshopper, illustration

Characters: Three storytellers, three ants, grasshopper, owls, squirrels and bears.  

(Stage Directions: the owls, squirrels and bears are in a large semicircle stage right; storytellers are stage left and the ants are in the centre of the stage.)

Storyteller 1: One hot summer’s day …

Storyteller 2: … there were some ants working hard.

Storyteller 3: They were collecting food for the winter. (All the ants are miming digging, pulling and pushing.)

Ant 1: I am so hot.

Ant 2: Me too!

Ant 3: This is very hard work.

Storyteller 1: They saw a grasshopper listening to some music on his iPod. (Grasshopper passes by, singing and dancing; the ants stop work and look at him.)

Storyteller 2: He was dancing …

Storyteller 3: … and laughing and enjoying the lovely weather.

Grasshopper: Ants, you are so silly. You need to enjoy the sunshine.

(Ants start working again.)

Ant 1: We are working hard.

Ant 2: We want to have food for the winter. (Grasshopper keeps dancing.)

Storyteller 1: The grasshopper continued enjoying himself. (The Ants keep working and move stage right.)

Storyteller 2: Winter started to come and the weather got colder and colder.

Storyteller 3: The snow began to fall.

Storyteller 1: The grasshopper was cold and hungry. (Grasshopper rubs his stomach and shivers. He looks at the owls that start to fly around the stage.)

Grasshopper: I am cold and hungry; perhaps my friends the owls will feed me. Owls! Owls! Will you please feed me?

Owls: (Owls fly around the grasshopper and stop centre stage. They stand around the grasshopper.) Twit Tuhooo! Oh no, we will not feed you. (They fly back to their place in the semicircle.)

Grasshopper: Oh dear! I know, I will ask my friends the bears to feed me. (Grasshopper walks towards the bears.) Bears! Bears! Please feed me. (Bears are asleep so he wakes them up and they walk to the centre stage.)

Bears: (The bears are very angry that they have been woken up.) Growl! Growl! Oh no, we will not feed you. (The bears go back to their place in the semicircle.)

Storyteller 1: Then the grasshopper saw some squirrels. (The squirrels mime eating nuts stage right.)

Grasshopper: Squirrels! Squirrels! Please feed me! (They squirrels walk towards him.)

Squirrels: Oh no, we will not feed you. (They hop back to stage right.)

Storyteller 2: The grasshopper was very cold and hungry. He didn’t know what to do. (Grasshopper is shivering and rubbing his stomach.)

Storyteller 3: Then he thought of the ants. (The ants move to the centre of the stage.)

Grasshopper: Ants! Ants! Please feed me. (The ants go into a huddle away from the grasshopper.)

Storyteller 1: The ants thought about it and decided to give him some food. (All the ants face the grasshopper.)

Ant 1: You must promise that next year you will work hard in the summer. (Grasshopper gets down on his hands and knees.)

Grasshopper: Oh thank you Ants, I promise.

Storyteller 1: That summer the grasshopper kept his promise and worked hard to collect food for the next winter. (Grasshopper mimes pushing, pulling, carrying and digging with all the ants.)

Storyteller 2: The lesson of the story is: fail to prepare …

Storyteller 3: …prepare to fail.

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.