Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Fairy Tales, Plays for Children, Plays that teach emotions, Role playing stories

Thumbelina -A play based on Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytale

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Thumbelina

Characters: Three storytellers, Woman, Old Witch, Old Mother Toad, Thumbelina, Toad, Fish 1, Fish 2, Butterfly, Black Beetle, Beetle 1, Beetle 2, Mouse, Mole, Swallow, Tiny Man.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there lived a woman. (Woman is sitting on a chair in the centre of the stage, looking very sad.)

Storyteller 2: The woman was very sad because all she wished for was to have a child of her very own that she could love.

Woman: Oh, how I long for a child to hold in my arms.

Storyteller 3: An old witch was passing by and she heard the woman’s wish. (Old witch hobbles on to the stage and she stops when she hears the woman talking.)

Old Witch: Here, take this barley corn. If you plant it carefully in the ground, your wishes will come true. (Old Witch gives the woman the barley corn but the woman looks very confused.)

Storyteller 1: The woman was confused but she took the barley corn and planted it carefully in the ground.

Storyteller 2: One day…

Woman:  What a beautiful red and yellow flower. (She kisses it.)

Storyteller 3: Pop! The flower opened and out jumped a tiny girl.

Woman: Oh my goodness, what a beautiful girl you are, but you are so tiny. You are no bigger than my thumb. I shall call you Thumbelina.

Storyteller 1: The woman and Thumbelina lived happily together.

Storyteller 2: Thumbelina slept in a bed made of a walnut shell and she floated up and down the river in her nice, comfortable shell.

(An old toad comes hopping on to the stage.)

Old Mother Toad: (Looks at Thumbelina.) What’s this? It is a tiny girl. She will make a perfect wife for my son. I will just take this walnut shell and no one will miss her. (She pushes the walnut shell down the river.)

Storyteller 3: Old Mother Toad swims down the river with Thumbelina fast asleep in her walnut shell.

Storyteller 1: When Old Mother Toad got to the swamp, she tied the shell to a waterlily stem.

Old Mother Toad: Toad, Toad, come here look what I found. (Toad comes running on stage. He looks at the sleeping Thumbelina and smiles.)

Toad: She is perfect. (He rubs his hands together and smiles with glee.)

Storyteller 2: The next day, Thumbelina woke up.

Thumbelina: What’s going on? Where am I? This is not my home. (Looks at the toad.) Who are you?

Old Mother Toad: I’m old Mother Toad and this is my son, Toad.

Toad: My mother thought you would make the perfect wife for me. (The two toads hop off stage.)

Thumbelina: But I don’t want to marry a toad and live in a swamp. (Thumbelina tries to free her walnut shell from the waterlily stem but she can’t. She starts to cry.)

(Two fish swim by and they stop when they hear the sobbing.)

Fish 1: What’s the matter?

Thumbelina: Old Mother Toad kidnapped me from my home. She wants me to marry her son.

Fish: We will help you. (They start to bite through the rope.)

Fish 2: At last we have done it. Now you are free.

Thumbelina: Oh, thank you, Fish.

Fish: Good luck, Thumbelina. (They wave goodbye as Thumbelina floats down the river in her walnut shell.)

Thumbelina: Bye, bye. I’m so happy to escape those horrid toads.

(A butterfly lands on the shell.)

Butterfly: Hello, what’s your name? What are you doing?

Thumbelina: I’m Thumbelina. An old toad stole me from my home. She wanted me to marry her son, but two nice fish helped me escape. I just want to go home.

Butterfly:  Hold on tight to me and I’ll pull your walnut shell so you can get home faster.

(Enters a big black beetle on to the stage.)

Black Beetle: Look at that butterfly with that beautiful girl. I must take her and show her to the other beetles.

Storyteller 3: The big black beetle swooped down and scooped Thumbelina up and flew off with her.

Butterfly: Hey, come back! You can’t just take her.

Black Beetle: Ha, ha. I just did. See you later, butterfly.

Black Beetle: Look what I found. A beautiful tiny girl.

Beetle 1: She is not beautiful.

Beetle 2: She doesn’t have any feelers.

Beetle 1: And she has only two legs.

Beetle 2: I have never seen anything so ugly in my life. Get rid of her at once.

(Beetle flies off with Thumbelina and then he sees a daisy. He put her down gently on the daisy.)

Black Beetle: I will leave you here, Thumbelina, on this daisy.

Thumbelina: I just want to go home, but I’m stuck here.

Storyteller 1: Soon summer passed and winter came. It began to get colder and colder.

Thumbelina: (Shivering.) I won’t survive the winter if I don’t find a warmer place to stay.

Storyteller 2: She climbs down from the daisy and enters a field, and there she meets a mouse.

Mouse: You look cold and hungry. Come warm yourself by my fire and you can eat my food. You can live with me until winter is over.

Thumbelina: Thank you, mouse. I will cook and clean for you.

Storyteller 3: Thumbelina lived with the mouse for a few weeks. She cooked and cleaned for him. One day, mouse came home. He was very excited.

Mouse: I just got a text from my friend mole. He heard I had the most beautiful girl staying with me. He wants to meet you. Let’s go and visit him.

Storyteller 1: They trundled through the field and they came to a tunnel.

Thumbelina: I don’t want to go down this tunnel.

Mole: It is the only way we can reach Mole’s house.

Storyteller 2: Finally, Thumbelina agreed to go through the tunnel. They were halfway there when they saw a dead swallow.

Thumbelina: We must help him.

Mouse: He is dead.

Thumbelina: Let me put a blanket over him.

Mouse: That is a waste of a good blanket.

(Thumbelina puts the blanket over the swallow and they continue the journey.

Suddenly, Thumbelina hears something and turns around quickly.)

Thumbelina: What’s that?

Mouse: I don’t hear anything. We have to continue our journey it is getting late. Mole is waiting for us.

Thumbelina: It is a soft thump. Listen. It’s the swallow’s heart. He isn’t dead. Mouse, get him some water.

Swallow: Thank you.

Thumbelina: Swallow, I will look after you. Come and stay with us at Mole’s house.

They go off to Mole’s house.

Mole: What’s all this?

Thumbelina: It’s a swallow. We must care for him or he will die.

Mole: Oh very well, come in.

Storyteller 3: At the end of winter, Mole announced.

Mole: Great news, Thumbelina. I’ve decided to marry you.

Mouse: Congratulations, Thumbelina. You are so lucky; Mole is very rich.

Mole: Mouse will return to field and you will stay here with me underground.

Thumbelina: I don’t want to stay underground forever. I want to be outside in the warmth and the sunshine. (She starts to cry.)

Swallow: I’ve an idea. I’m strong enough to leave. Jump on my back and we can fly away.

Storyteller 1: Thumbelina jumped on the swallow’s back and away they flew.

Thumbelina:  Bye, Mouse. Thanks for everything.

Mouse: Bye, bye.

Mole: How ungrateful?

Swallow: Do you see those beautiful flowers below.

(Thumbelina nods her head.)

Swallow: Choose one of those flowers and I will put you down there.

Thumbelina: That one, there. (She points to one.)

Storyteller 3: The swallow put her down gently and there sitting in the flower, was a tiny man with a golden crown.

Tiny Man: Hello? Fancy meeting you here.

Thumbelina: I’m Thumbelina. Who are you?

Tiny Man: Every flower has a sprite living in them. I’m the King of all flower sprites.

You are so beautiful. Will you marry me?

Thumbelina: Oh yes.

Tiny man: Here take these wings. Now you can fly from flower to flower and visit the other flower sprites.

Storytellers: They lived happily ever after.

For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click here.

 

For free Hans Christian Andersen plays, click below.

The Money Pig

The Nutcracker

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, Plays that teach emotions, The Buddha and the angry man

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

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The Buddha and the Angry Man

(How to handle an insult)

Characters:  Storyteller, Buddha, Angry Man.

Storyteller: One day, the Buddha was walking from village to village to spread love and compassionate. (He walks slowly, looking around taking in the wonders of his surroundings.)

Buddha: What a lovely, sunny day it is for a walk.

(Suddenly, an angry man runs towards him, waving his fists.)

Angry Man: Who do you think you are?

Buddha: Whatever is the matter?

Angry Man: You that’s what is the matter, you walk around, thinking you know everything to teach goodness and love. You are just a fake, silly man in an orange robe.

Buddha: Come sit with me. (He guides towards a tree and they sit in the shade.)

Angry Man: (confused)

Why are you not angry with my insult?

Buddha: I’ve a question for you.

Angry Man: What?

Buddha: If you buy a present for someone and that person doesn’t want it then whom does the present belong to?

Angry Man: What a strange question. Me, of course, I bought the present.

Buddha: That’s right and its exactly the same with your anger.

Angry Man: That makes no sense.

Buddha: It’s very clear, if you become angry with me and I do not accept your anger then it falls back on you and all you succeed in doing is hurt yourself more.

Angry Man: What should I do?

Buddha: Rid yourself of your anger and become a more a loving person.

Angry Man: I will try. Thank you for teaching me this lesson. (They hug and wave goodbye to one another.)

Storyteller: The moral of story is when you have hate and anger towards other people only you are unhappy.

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays that teach emotions, Role playing stories, Storytelling in the Early years

The Four Friends and the Hunter – 5 minute play based on the Panchatantra story.

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About the Panchatantra:
The Panchatantra is one of the world’s oldest books and even today it remains one of the most popular works of literature. It originated in India and was initially written in the Indian languages of Sanskrit and Pali. It is a collection of stories with morals that aim to help people to succeed in life. It is believed to have been written around 300 B.C by Vishnu Sharma. The Panchatantra has been translated into fifty languages and there are over two hundred different versions available.

Background to the Panchatantra:
The legend behind the Panchatantra is there once lived a king who had three sons. The sons were not very bright. The king was worried that they might not rule his kingdom justly and fairly when he died. The king asked a Brahmin called Vishnu Sharma to help his sons become more knowledgeable. Sharma decided to pass on his wisdom by the use of stories. In these stories, all animals take on human qualities. Pancha means “five” and tantra means “ways” or “principles.”
The five books or principles are:
Book 1: The separation of friends. (The Bull and the Lion.)
Book 2: The gaining of friends. (The Four Friends and the Hunter)
Book 3: Conflict and solutions. (The Owl and Crow)
Book 4: Loss of gains. (The Monkey and the Crocodile.)
Book 5: Ill-considered actions. (The Sage and the Mouse.)

Write Your Own Panchatantra Tale

Book/principle:

Title:

Characters:

Hero/es:

Villain/s:

Other character/s:

Setting:

Problem:

Solution:

Trickery:

Moral:

To help you write your own tale, the following is a list of the most common characters found in the Panchatantra:
Brahmin
King
Hunter
Sage
Lion
Tiger
Jackal
Crow
Fish
Deer
Owl
Hare
Monkey
Crocodile
Rat
Dove
Pigeon
Tortoise
Mongoose
Mouse
                        The Four Friends and the Hunter

Characters: Three storytellers, mouse, crow, deer, turtle, two hunters.

Storyteller 1: Long, long, ago there lived three friends in the jungle.
Storyteller 2: There was a deer, a crow, and a mouse.
(Deer, crow and mouse are all jumping and playing with each other.)
Storyteller 2: They always played together and looked out for one another. One day, a turtle came along.
(Turtle plods slowly towards the three friends.
Turtle: Hello, everyone. May I play with you and be your friend?
Deer: Of course.
Crow: You are most welcome.
Mouse: Come and play with us now.
Storyteller 1: Then, suddenly, the mouse stopped and sniffed and he said…
Mouse: I smell some hunters.
Deer: What will we do?
Crow: Quick, let’s get out of here.
(Enter two hunters looking for prey.)
Storyteller 2: The deer darted through the jungle.
Storyteller 3: The crow flew high up into the sky.
Storyteller 2: And the mouse scarpered into a hole, but the turtle moved very slowly indeed.
Hunter 1: Oh no! We just missed that juicy deer.
Hunter 2: Never mind (points to turtle); we can catch that turtle and we will have delicious turtle stew for dinner.
(The hunters capture the turtle. They put a net over him and start to pull.)
Storyteller 3: The turtle’s three friends were very worried.
Mouse: They have caught the turtle!
Crow: How will we save him?
Deer: Listen, I have an idea. (They huddle up together and whisper to each other.)
Storyteller 1: The crow flew up into the sky and spotted the two hunters carrying the turtle near the river.
Crow: (shouts down and points) There they are.
Storyteller 2: The deer darted through the jungle and when she came to the path, she lay down as if she were dead.
Hunter 1: Do you see what I see?
Hunter 2: Yes, it is a dead deer.
Hunter: We really will eat like kings tonight.
Hunter 2: And we can sell its beautiful skin to the highest bidder.
Storyteller 3: In their excitement, they put down the turtle.
Storyteller 1: This was exactly what the deer had planned.
(Mouse sneaks out very quietly and starts to gnaw at the rope)
Turtle: I’m free! Thank you mouse. You are a true friend.
Mouse: Come with me.
(Turtle moves slowly and then disappears into the river and the mouse runs into the jungle.)
Storyteller 1: Just as the hunters were going to lean down and take the deer, she got up and darted off into the jungle.
Hunter 1: She wasn’t dead at all.
Hunter 2: Never mind, we still have the turtle.
Storyteller 2: They turned around and saw that the trap was empty and the turtle was gone.
Hunter 1: The trap is empty.
Hunter 2: (sighs) Looks like we will go hungry again tonight.
Storytellers: The moral of this story is this: A friend in need is a friend indeed.

If you would like to read more plays based on the Panchatantra then go to