Posted in Drama for children

The Monkey and the Crocodile – A simple play for children based on an old Indian Story

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Char2acters: Three storytellers, the crocodile, the crocodile’s wife and the monkey.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a crocodile that lived in the river Ganges in India.
(Crocodile enters stage swimming slowly.)
Storyteller 2: On both sides of the Ganges there were large music fruit trees.
Storyteller 3: A monkey lived in one of the trees. He ate fruit all day.
(Monkey mimes eating fruit.)
Monkey: These fruits are so delicious and juicy I’m so lucky to live in a fruit tree.
(Crocodile sits under the tree for shade.)
Crocodile: It is very hot I think I will sit under this tree and sleep in the shade. (Looks up.) The fruits on tree look so delicious. I wish I could climb the tree and pick some.
Monkey: (climbs down from the tree) Since you are resting under my tree, you are my guest. Please come and taste some of my delicious fruits.
Storyteller 1: The monkey plucked the juiciest fruit off the tree and gave it to the crocodile.
Crocodile: Oh thank you Monkey you are so kind.
Monkey: You are welcome. Come again, any time.
Storyteller 2: Soon, the crocodile came every day. They would eat the fruit and talk to one another for hours.
(Crocodile and the monkey mime having a conversation and eating lots of fruits.)
Storyteller 3: One day as the crocodile was leaving to swim home. The monkey gave him some fruit.
Monkey: Crocodile give these fruits to your wife. I plucked them especially for her.
Storyteller 1: The crocodile swam home and gave the fruit to his wife, She was very happy.
(Crocodile swims home and gives his wife the fruit.)
Crocodile’s wife: These fruits are delicious. I have never tasted such sweet fruit in all my life. Where did you get them from?
Crocodile: I got them from my friend the monkey. He lives in the fruit tree so he knows which ones are the sweetest.
Crocodile’s wife: Does the monkey eat fruit every day?
Crocodile: Yes, only the sweetest and juiciest ones. Why do you ask?
Crocodile’s wife: Because that means his heart must be so sweet. If I eat his heart I would remain young and beautiful forever. You must steal the monkey’s heart and give it to me.
Crocodile: But he is my good friend. He is my only friend. It would be unfair for me to steal his heart.
Crocodile’s wife: (gets angry) If you loved me you would do it.
Crocodile: Do not get anger my dear, I will do as you wish.
Storyteller 2: The next day the crocodile swam to the riverbank and reached the tree where the monkey lived.
Monkey: Crocodile, you are late today. I thought you weren’t coming.
Crocodile: My wife has made a meal for you. She has invited you to tea because she wants to thank you for giving her your beautiful sweet fruit.
Monkey: That’s very kind of her but I’m a land animal, I can’t swim.
Crocodile: We live on a sand bank just jump on my back and I’ll take you there.
Storyteller 3: The monkey hopped on the crocodile’s back and away they went.
Monkey: Slow down, Croc. You are going too fast.
Crocodile: I’m sorry Monkey but I have to go fast because my wife wants to eat your heart for her tea.
Monkey: Oh Croc, you should have told me this before we left. I always keep my heart in the hollow of the tree for safe keeping.
Crocodile: I’ll take you back to the tree and you can collect your heart.
Monkey: That would be great.
Storyteller 1: Crocodile turns and swims back to the tree where the monkey lives upon reaching the bank the monkey jumps off the crocodiles back and clambers up the tree. After a while the crocodile says…..
Crocodile: Monkey, you must have found your heart by now. My wife will get angry if we don’t arrive soon.
Monkey: You are so foolish crocodile. Don’t you know your heart is within yourself? It was a trick to save my life. Now leave my tree and never come back again.
Storyteller 2: The crocodile left empty handed.
(Crocodile’s wife looks very angry.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story is at times presence of mind pays well.

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Posted in Drama for children, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Movement Story – The Tortoise and the Hare

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Movement Story
The Tortoise and the Hare

Resources needed: Clear space and a copy of the story below.
Introduction: Ask the children do they know the story of the tortoise and the hare. Tell them you are going to tell them the story but instead of just sitting and listening they are going to participate in the story. Tell them that they are going to listen out for the following words and they have to do the action associated with that word when they hear it in the story. The teacher should explain any words that the children might not understand such as boastful – boast is telling everyone how good you are at everything. The teacher should go through the different words and their movement. If there are too many words for the age group the teacher can omit some of them. Once the teacher has gone through the words and the actions, she then shouts out words randomly to see if everyone knows the action. The children find their own space in the room so they can move freely and then the story can begin.

Boast/boastful/boasting – stand up straight and puff out chest
Woods – children make themselves into trees.
Animals – each child choose a different animal found in the woods and move like that animal.
Hare – make bunny ears with your hands.
Fast – children move as fast as they can
Run/ran – run on the spot
Tortoise – children bend over as if they have something heavy on their back.
Slow/slowly – children move in slow motion around the room.

Once upon a time there was a very boastful hare who lived in a woods with lots of other animals. He was always boasting about how fast he could run. He boasted “I’m the fastest animal in the woods. No one can run as fast as me.” The other animals were tired of listening to him. One day the tortoise said to the hareHare, you are so boastful. I challenge you to race.” Hare laughed and said “Tortoise, you will never beat me. You are too slow and steady.” They decided whoever got to the other side of the woods the fastest was the winner. All the other animals in the woods came to watch the race. The hare ran as fast as he could through the woods. After a while he thought to himself “I’m so fast that slow tortoise will never beat me. I think I will take a quick nap.” Soon, he fell asleep. The tortoise walked slowly through the woods. He passed the sleeping hare. The animals watched the tortoise near the finishing line. The animals cheered loudly. The hare woke up and ran as fast as he could through the woods to the finishing line but it was too late. The slow tortoise had won the race. All the animals in the wood congratulated the tortoise. The hare had to remind himself that he shouldn’t boast about his fast pace because slow and steady won the race.

Closure: Do you think the hare was boastful after the race? Why not? What lesson did we learn from the story? Now I want you to be your chosen animal again. Everyone line up we are going to have a race but you must move in slow motion.

 

Posted in Action Poems, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Mime, Mime for kids, Movement activities

Emotions -a drama workshop for children based on emotions


Drama is a great way of expressing emotions. Explain to the children everything we do and every thought we have comes with a feeling. Sometimes the feelings feel good and sometimes not so good. Some feelings are strong, some are weak. When we feel something we can choos want to do about that feeling. Sometimes we try to ignore it and it goes away and sometime it takes over and we cannot think of anything else. When you get a feeling, first work out what it is and come up with an idea about what to do about it.

When you are feeling…….
Happy
Angry
Bored
Worried
Sad
Excited
Grumpy
Scared
Quiet
Jealous
Embarrassed
Shy

Everyone makes mask with different emotions. Walk around the trying portray their emotions.
The rest of the class has to get what emotion you are portraying.

 

ACTIVITY: EMOTION ACTION SONG.

The song is a variation on the classic “If You Are Happy, And You Know It.”

When I sing this, I over exaggerate my faces. And I encourage the children to make the faces along with the body language. So often we focus emotion lessons only on faces, but children’s bodies tell us how they are feeling too.

If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you are happy, and you know it, clap your hands.

Now replace happy with different emotions:

Mad – cross your arms.
Frustrated – stomp your feet.
Excited – jump up and down.
Sad – make a frown
Scared – hide your face.

Mirror, Mirror

Pair the children up. One child makes an emotion face and their partner identifies the emotion and duplicates it.

Posted in Action Poems, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A drama workshop for children

 

Warm up – Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices
Who has been sitting in my chair?
Who has eating my porridge?
Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:
Loud
Quiet
Fast
Slow
Sad
Happy
Angry
Excited
Surprised
Frightened
Annoyed

“Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….
Walk as
Daddy bear
Mummy bear
Baby bear
Goldilocks
Grumpy daddy bear
Kind mummy bear
Happy baby bear
Surprised Goldilocks”.

Main Focus:
Read the movement story Goldilocks and the three bears. Click on the link.

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

When Goldilocks went to the house of the Bears – movement poetry. Click on the link below.

Action Poems for Young Children – Movement

Closure: In groups of 4 make a still image of your favorite scene. Present your still image to the rest of the class.

Posted in Action Poems, buddha stories, Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama for children, drama for kids, Panchatantra plays, Plays, plays about destiny, Plays about graditude, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, The Buddha and the angry man, the Buddha and the beggar man

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

 

 


Characters: Two storytellers, Beggar Man, Mouse, Man, Woman, Daughter, Wizard, Giant Turtle and Buddha.


Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there was a homeless man who begged every day for food.
(People pass by and give him food.)
Beggar Man: I’m so lucky that kind people give me food.
(Beggar Man falls asleep and mouse creeps up and steals his food. The Beggar Man wakes up suddenly and sees the mouse.)
Beggar Man: Mouse, why are you stealing my food. I’m just a poor beggar man.
Mouse: I’m doing you a favour because no matter how much you beg or how generous people are, you will never be allowed to keep more than eight items.
Beggar Man: You has decided that I can’t ow more than eight items.
Mouse: The Buddha has decided.
Beggar Man: But why me?
Mouse: Why don’t you go find him and ask him.
(Mouse scampers off with the food.)
Beggar Man: Well, I better go find the Buddha and ask him why I’m not allowed to possess more than eight items.
Storyteller 2: So the beggar man gathered his few belongings and went on a journey to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He travelled all day. As night fell, he grew cold and hungry.
Beggar Man: There is no sign of the Buddha. I’m tired and hungry. There is a light over there. Perhaps if I knock on the door, they may let me stay for the night.
(He Knocks on the door. A man opens the door with a warm smile.)
Beggar Man: I’m cold and hungry, please can I stay the night?
Man: Of course, Please come in.
Woman: Sit down and have some food with us.
(He enters the house and sits down on a table with the Man, woman and their daughter.)
Man: Where are you going at this time at night?
Beggar Man: I’m going to find the Buddha. I’ve a very important question to ask him. I just need a good night’s sleep and I’ll be on my way early in the morning.
(Man and woman look at each other.)
Woman: We have a question for you to ask the Buddha.
Man: Our daughter can’t speak. Please ask the Buddha what we need to do hear her beautiful voice.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll ask the Buddha your question. Thanks you for the food and bed.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man continues on his way and his quest to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He comes across a range of mountains.
Beggar Man: Oh dear, the mountains look to difficult to climb but I really need to find the Buddha to ask my questions.
(He starts to climb the mountains.)
Beggar Man: This is very difficult. I will never make it. (he sits downs and starts to weep.)
(Enters wizard.)
Wizard: What’s the matter, young man? Why are you crying?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha but I can’t climb these mountains. I’ll never find him now.
Wizard: I’ll help you. We can use my magic to fly over the mountain come with me.
Storyteller 2: Wizard used his staff’s magic to fly the beggar man and himself across the mountains.
Beggar Man: Thank you so much, wizard. I’d have never made if it wasn’t for you.
Wizard: You are welcome but can I ask you a favour.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll do anything to show my gratitude.
Wizard: Can you ask the Buddha what do I have to do to get to heaven. I’ve been trying to get there for a thousand years.
(The beggar man nods his head and they hug and the wizard hops on his staff and flies off.)
Storyteller 1: The beggar man continues on his journey and comes across a river.
Beggar Man: I don’t believe this. How am I going to get across the river? (he sighs)
(Enters Giant Turtle.)
Giant Turtle: You look sad. What’s the matter?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha and I can’t get across the river to find him.
Giant Turtle: Jump on my back and I’ll swim across. (The beggar man jumps on the Giant Turtle’s back and they swim across the river.
Beggar Man: Thank you, Giant Turtle. How can I repay you?
Giant Turtle: Can you ask the Buddha a question for me?
Beggar Man: Of course, what is your question?
Giant Turtle: Ask the Buddha why I haven’t become a dragon. I’ve been trying to become a dragon for 500 years.
(Beggar Man nods and hugs the giant turtle.)
Storyteller 2: Eventually the beggar man finds the Buddha under the Bodhi Tree.
Beggar Man: I’m so glad. I’ve found you. I’ve got so many question to ask you.
Buddha: I will only answer three questions.
Beggar Man: But I’ve four questions to ask and they all very important.
Buddha: Ask yourself, are they equally important?
Storyteller 1: The beggar man thought very carefully.
Beggar Man: Well, the giant turtle is trying to be a dragon for fifty years. The wizard has trying to go to heaven for 1000 years. The young girl will be unable to speak for the rest of her life if I don’t ask her question. I’m just a homeless beggar. I can go back and continue begging. My question is the least important by far.
(Beggar Man goes back to the Buddha.)
Beggar Man: My first question is how can the turtle become a dragon?
Buddha: Simple, he needs to leave the comfort of his own shell, unless he does that he will never be a dragon.
Beggar Man: My second question is how can the wizard go to heaven?
Buddha: He must put down his magic staff as it keeps him on earth. The moment he puts it down he will be free to go to heaven.
Beggar Man: My third question how can the young girl speak.
Buddha: She will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Beggar Man: Thank you for answering my questions.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man turned around and started his journey home. He meets the Giant Turtle.
Giant Turtle: Hey Beggar man, did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Take off your shell and you will become a dragon.
(Giant Turtle takes off his shell.)
Giant Turtle: I’ve this priceless pearls in my shell. Here take them. I won’t need them anymore because I’m a dragon. Good bye and good luck.)
(The dragon flies off.)
(Enters the wizard.)
Wizard: Did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Put your staff down and you can go to heaven.
Wizard: Here take my staff, Use its power wisely. Thank you.
(The wizard ascends into heaven.)
Beggar Man: I now I’ve wealth from the turtle and power from the wizard. He hops on the staff and makes his way back tom the family that gave him food and shelter.
Man: Hello, did you ask the Buddha our question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Your daughter will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Daughter: Hello, you are the man that was here last week.
Woman: Looks like you found your soulmate.
(Daughter and beggar man hug.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story if you do good, you will be repaid.

 

If we’re willing to lend a hand to those who are struggling more than us, willing to help them, it may change the course of your life, your destiny. And the universe may repay you in such a way that you never would have imagined.

 

Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

 

 

Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click on the link below:

 

Posted in Adam and Eve play, bible plays, Bible stories, Bible stories on stage, christain plays, five minute bible play, Plays, Plays for Children, spirtual plays

The Creation (In the Beginning) – a children’s play based on a bible storyteller

 

 

The Creation (In The Beginning)

 

Characters: Storyteller, God, Light, Dark, Sky, Sea, Water, Land, Moon, Stars, Fish, Birds, Plants, Trees and Animals (there can be as many stars, fish, birds, plants, trees and animals as you want.)

 

Storyteller: In the beginning, there was only God.

(Enter God. He stumbles around in the darkness.)

God: This world is very empty, there is nothing here. (He looks around in the darkness.) I think it’s time for a change. I will make this world brighter and fuller.

God: First of all, we need light. Light, light come here at once.

Light: You called, God. (Light stops suddenly and starts to walk slowly in the dark.) It’s very dark in here.

God: I know, that’s why I called you. This world needs light.

Light: Let there be light. (This stage gradually becomes brighter.) That’s much better.

God: I shall call you day but it can’t be day all the time. Let me think… (God scratches his head.) I know, we need some darkness. Dark, dark come here at once.

Dark: You called God. (Dark stumbles on the stage and he is blinded by light.) It’s very bright in here. (He puts on his sunglasses.)

God: I know, that’s why I called you. I need you to make the earth dark half the time.

Dark: Let there be darkness. (Lights are dimmed.)

Storyteller: That was the first day on earth. The second day began and God said…

God: I’ve more work to do. (He looks up.) How will I cover up the blackness of space? I know, I will make a sky. (Sky appears on stage and looks a bit confused.)

Sky: Where am I? What am I?

God: You are the sky. You will have a very special job you will be the top of the world.

Sky: How wonderful, I can look below and see everything. (Looks down but is disappointed because there is nothing there.) There’s not much to see.

God: Have patience Sky, my work here is not done.

Storyteller: On the third day, God thought to himself.

God: The world is missing something. I’ve got night, day, the sky. I think we need some water. Let there be water. (Water enters.)

Water: You called God. How can I help?

God: I need something to cover the bottom of this world. (He points around the stage.)

Water: I will cover the world. (He tries to spread himself all over the stage but he can’t cover the entire space.)

I don’t think I can fill all the space at the bottom of the world.

God: I shall call your friend, land. She might be able to help. Let there be land.

Land: You called God, how can I help you?

God: I need some dry land for the world.

Land: (looks at her watch) I’ve time to stay here in this world for a few billion years.

God: Water, you shall be known as sea and land you shall be known as earth.

Storyteller: Now there was day, night, sky, sea and earth.

Storyteller: On the fourth day the sky came to God and said…

Sky: I’m lonely up here.

God: Don’t worry, I’ll get you some friends. Let there be stars and moon. (Enter the stars and the moon.)

Stars and Moon: We will brighten up the sky so she will never be lonely again.

Storyteller: On the fifth day, the water came to God and said…

Water: I’m lonely here by myself. This sky has the moon and stars to play with, I’ve got no one.

God: Don’t worry water. I’ll get you some friends. Let there be fish in the sea, birds in the sky.

(Enter the fish and the birds.)

Fish and Birds: We will swim in the sea and fly up the sky so the sky and the sea will never be lonely again.

Storyteller: On the fifth day the land came to God and said…

Land: God, I’m lonely I need some friends. The sky has the moon, the stars and the birds and the water has the fish. I have no one.

God: Don’t worry land I’ll get you some friends. Let there be plants, tree and animals on the earth. (Enter animals).

Plants, Trees and Animals: We will grow and roam on the land and the earth will never be lonely again.

Storyteller: On the seventh day, God looked around and said…

God: I’m very pleased with the new world I created. I think I’m finally finished. There is one more thing for me to do and that is to make the seventh day a day of rest.

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, Plays that teach emotions, The Buddha and the angry man

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

 

The Buddha and the Angry Man

(How to handle an insult)

 

Characters:  Storyteller, Buddha, Angry Man.

Storyteller: One day, the Buddha was walking from village to village to spread love and compassionate. (He walks slowly, looking around taking in the wonders of his surroundings.)

Buddha: What a lovely, sunny day it is for a walk.

(Suddenly, an angry man runs towards him, waving his fists.)

Angry Man: Who do you think you are?

Buddha: Whatever is the matter?

Angry Man: You that’s what is the matter, you walk around, thinking you know everything to teach goodness and love. You are just a fake, silly man in an orange robe.

Buddha: Come sit with me. (He guides towards a tree and they sit in the shade.)

Angry Man: (confused)

Why are you not angry with my insult?

Buddha: I’ve a question for you.

Angry Man: What?

Buddha: If you buy a present for someone and that person doesn’t want it then whom does the present belong to?

Angry Man: What a strange question. Me, of course, I bought the present.

Buddha: That’s right and its exactly the same with your anger.

Angry Man: That makes no sense.

Buddha: It’s very clear, if you become angry with me and I do not accept your anger then it falls back on you and all you succeed in doing is hurt yourself more.

Angry Man: What should I do?

Buddha: Rid yourself of your anger and become a more a loving person.

Angry Man: I will try. Thank you for teaching me this lesson. (They hug and wave goodbye to one another.)

Storyteller: The moral of story is when you have hate and anger towards other people only you are unhappy