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The Three Little Pigs Children’s Drama Workshop

Three Little Pigs and Scary Wolf Illustration

The Three Little Pigs – Drama Workshop

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action.  The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud and when the children hear their word they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action.

Any number: Show that number of fingers.

Little: Crouch down as small as you can.

Pig: Get on all fours and oink once.

Pigs: Get on all fours and oink twice.

Big: Stretch up as high as you can.

Bad: Make an angry face.

Wolf: Make hands into claws and say “aargh.”

Laughing: Laugh loudly.

Smiling: Big wide smile.

Trotted: Trot up and down the space.

Straw: Rub your hands together.

Sticks: Clap your hands together.

Bricks: Clap your hands on your thighs.

Huff/huffed: Blow.

Puff/puffed: Blow harder.

Blow\blew: Stamp feet on the ground.

Narrator: Once upon a time there was a mother pig that lived with her three little pigs. One day she said “Little pigs, I think it is time for you to leave and make your own way in this big world. You each need to build your own house.” The little pigs were very excited about their new, big adventure. Mother pig gave each of her little pigs a hug, but she warned them “Remember to watch out for the big bad wolf.” The little pigs waved goodbye to their mother and they trotted into the woods. They were laughing and smiling and soon they came across a man who was carrying some straw. The first little pig said, “may I have some straw to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the first little pig some straw to build his house. Just before they left the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The first little pig built his house of straw. The two other pigs trotted on down the road. They were laughing and smiling and soon they came across a man who was carrying some sticks. The second little pig said, “May I have some sticks to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the second little pig some sticks to build his house. Just before they left the man warned them, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The second little pig built his house of sticks. The third little pig trotted on down the road. He was laughing and smiling and soon he came across a man who was carrying some bricks. The third little pig said, “May I have some bricks to build my house.” The man said kindly, “Of course, you may.” The man gave the third little pig some bricks to build his house. Just before they left the man warned him, “Watch out for the big bad wolf.” The third little pig built his house of bricks. The first little pig had just finished building his house of straw when the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The first little pig replied, “Not by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down. So, he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down. The first little pig trotted very quickly to his brother’s house made of sticks. The second little pig had just finished building his house of sticks when he heard a knock on the door and to his surprise it was his brother. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The second little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” So, he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house down. The two little pigs trotted very quickly to their brother’s house made of bricks.

The third little pig had just finished building his house of bricks when he heard a knock on the door and to his surprise it was his two brothers. Suddenly, the big bad wolf appeared. He said, “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.” The third little pig replied, “Not by hair of my chinny, chin, chin.” Then the wolf said, “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I will blow the house down.” The wolf huffed, and he puffed. He huffed, and he puffed but he couldn’t blow the house down. He heard the three little pigs inside the house. They were laughing. This made the wolf very angry indeed. He decided he would climb to the top of the roof and come down the chimney. The third little pig heard him on the roof and he came up with a clever plan. He put a big pot of boiling water on the fire which was just underneath the chimney. The wolf came tumbling down the chimney and landed into the big pot of boiling water and “SPLASH!” That was the end of the big bad wolf. The three little pigs lived happily ever after.

Warm up: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Mr. or Ms. Wolf and stands at one side of the clear space. His/Her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Mr. /Ms. Wolf?” The Wolf does not turn around. He/she replies in a rough, wolf-like voice: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps the wolf calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Mr./Ms. Wolf?” The wolf replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate amount of steps forward. Eventually, when the wolf thinks that the children are near enough he/she will say: “Dinnertime!” Then the wolf turns around and chases the children. They have to try to rush back to their starting place. If Mr./Ms. Wolf catches one of them before they reach home, that child is the wolf in the next game.

Choral Speaking: Teach the children the following poem. Get them to think of different actions for the straw, sticks, bricks, pigs and wolf. They say the poem in unison.

Straw, Sticks and Bricks

Straw, sticks and bricks.

Straw, sticks and bricks.

The pigs built their houses

out of straw, sticks and bricks

The wolf came by,

he blew the straw down.

He blew the sticks but the bricks were strong

The pig lived happy all the days long

In their house of bricks.

Occupational Mime: Divide the class into groups of 4s. Three pigs and one wolf.  The pigs move round the room in a ‘follow my leader’ style. The pig at the front of the line is doing the actions. The first pig mimes collecting materials and building a house of straw. Second and third pigs follow, copying the mime. When the house is blown down by the wolf, the first pig moves to the end of the line. Second pig then heads the line and mimes building house of sticks. Finally, third pig takes a turn and mimes building a house of bricks. The wolf move around the room avoiding pigs as they build until it is time to blow the house down.

Role-play: Encourage different movements such as gathering straw, breaking sticks or lifting heavy bricks. Encourage the wolves to use their body and facial expression to look fierce and threatening. Give everyone in the group the opportunity to take on the role of the wolf. When the children are comfortable with the character movements, get them to use speech. Ask the following questions:

What does the wolf sound like?

What would he say to the little pigs?

What do the pigs sound like?

What would they say to the wolf?

Talking objects: Ask children if they can take on the role of the wolf. They use their breaths to blow down the house. Get them to huff and puff and huff and puff and blow the house down. Everyone sits in a circle and the teacher presents the group with objects that can be blown down by the breath, the wind or a hurricane such as leaf, balloon, paper, tree, car or even a bridge. Every child become an object, they enter the circle and gives the group some information who they are. For example: “I’m small, I’m green and live on a tree”. Once the rest of group have guess correctly everyone blows the object down.

Conclusion: The teacher discuss with the group reasons why the wolf gets very angry. The teacher asks the children wonder how they can  show  him show to use his breath to relax. The wolf uses his breath to blow things down but he could use his breath for relaxation exercises.

Relaxation technique: Tummy breathing – The children find their own space on the floor. They lie down and place their hands or a stuffed toy on their tummy. They inhale on a count of three. They see their tummy or stuffed toy rising as their tummy fills with air. They exhale on the count of four and they see their hands or stuffed toys falling. Repeat this process 10 times. When everyone is finished ask the children the following questions:

How do they feel?

What did they notice about their hands/stuffed toy when they inhaled and exhaled?

How would this relaxation/breathing exercise help the wolf?

Goldilocks and the Three Bears –  a drama workshop for children.

 

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Posted in Action Poems, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, English as a second language, English teaching games, fables, Fairy Tales, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Story sacks, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, the lion and the mouse

The Lion and the Mouse: A fun drama workshop for young children.

The Lion and the Mouse.

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action to the story the lion and the mouse. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action.

Lion: Get down on hands and knees, and move around stealthily as a lion stalking his prey.

Mouse: Scamper like a mouse and squeak.

Forest: Make yourself into a large tree.

Roar/roared/roaring: Roar loudly like a lion.  

Eat: Do a gobbling action.

Help: Extend hands in a kindly gesture.

Narrator: One day, a lion was fast asleep in the forest, his head resting on his paw and he was snoring away. A timid little mouse came scampering by him and accidentally scampered across the lion’s nose. The lion woke up with a loud roar. The lion laid his huge paw angrily on the timid little mouse. He roared, “I’m going to eat you up.”

“Don’t eat me!” begged the poor mouse. “Please let me go and someday I will help you.”

The lion was much amused to think that a mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the mouse go.

Some days later, while walking in the forest, the lion was caught in a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The mouse heard the roar and quickly found the lion trapped in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she chewed it until it fell apart, and soon the lion was free.

“You laughed when I said one day I would help you,” said the mouse. “Now, you see that even a mouse can help a lion.”

They hugged, and from then on, the lion and the mouse were very good friends.

Introduction:

Ask the children to name different jungle animals. They discuss what they can do, what they eat, where they live in the jungle. Then each child chooses their favour it’s jungle animal. The teacher goes around the circle and each child get an opportunity to speak about its favorite jungle animal

My favorite animal is …..

It’s …….

It’s got……..

It lives in………

It eats …….

It moves like………..

Warm up:

Children are running through the ‘jungle’ and run into many animals, etc that they need to get away from. The teacher can give appropriate commands, and the children carry out a suitable action:

jump over logs

duck under branches

high knees through quicksand

run from the tiger

tip toe past the snake

talk to the monkeys (ooh, ooh, aah, aah), etc.

This really gets kids’ hearts pumping and they have a blast!

Main Focus of workshop:

The Lion’s Court: Before starting this game it is a good idea for the teacher to talk about the different animals that are found in the jungle. The teacher should ask the children who is the King of the Jungle? The teacher then assumes the role of a lion who is the King of the Jungle. It would be a good idea to have a crown for the lion. The children can make a court for the lion with chairs and a table or with cushions. Inside the court the lion sits on a throne. Each child chooses an animal they would like to pretend to be. The lion tells the other animals he is looking for animals to join his court. One by one he calls all the animals to him and asks them why he should let them join his court. The child must say what type of animal they are and what good qualities they have and how they will be useful to the lion, the King of the Jungle. When they have finished the King says “you may join my court” and lets them in. This is why it is a good idea to designated area in the jungle.

Dramatic play is a great way to teach important communication skills to children. Jungles hold a fascination for children, and incorporating drama workshop with a jungle theme can be fun for both  teachers and  children  alike. Add music, costumes and props to your dramatic play if possible.

Closure:

Sleeping Lions: All the children are lions (tigers, cows or any animal they want to be). They lie down on the floor; eyes closed and stay still, as if they were sleeping. The teacher goes around the room, trying to get the lions to move. If they move, then they have to get up and help the teacher to try to get the other lions to move. They are not allowed to touch the lions, but may move close to them, tell jokes or pull faces. After five minutes, with a loud roar, tell the lions who are still on the floor to wake up. 

For more drama ideas for young children click on Amazon.com

For more drama activities about Aesop’s Fables, click on the links below.

Aesop’s Fables

The Lion and the Mouse – a rhyming play.

The Lion and the Mouse – a fun movement story

 

 

Posted in Action Poems, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, Voice Production

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Workshop for children.

image_2ecde2fa-3b51-4ab9-b4b8-d32ee2707fbe
Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action

Goldilocks: Skip around the space.

Bear/Bears: Walk slowly and growl.

Bowl/Bowls: Clasp fingers together and stick out arms to make a round shape.

Porridge: Wiggle body up and down.

Chair/s: Squat down and stick out arms.

Bed/s: Lies straight on the floor.

First: Holds up one finger.

Second: Holds up two fingers.

Third: Holds up three fingers.

Narrator: Once upon a time, there was a girl called Goldilocks. One day, she decided to go for a walk in the woods. Soon, she became tired. She saw a little cottage in the woods. She knocked, but there was no answer, so she decided to go inside and rest.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. Goldilocks was hungry. She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.

“This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed.

So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.

“This porridge is too cold,” she said.

So, she tasted the third bowl of porridge.

“Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily, and she ate it all up.

After she’d eaten the three bears’ breakfasts, she decided she was feeling a little tired. So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs. Goldilocks sat in the first chair to rest her feet.

“This chair is too big!” she exclaimed.

So she sat in the second chair.

“This chair is too big, too!” she whined.

So she tried the third and smallest chair.

“Ahhh, this chair is just right,” she sighed. But just as she settled down into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!

Goldilocks was very tired by this time, so she went upstairs to the bedroom. She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. Then she lay in the second bed, but it was too soft. Then she lay down in the third bed, and it was just right. Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” growled the Papa bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” said the Mama bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge, and they ate it all up!” cried the Baby bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” growled the Papa bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” said the Mama bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair, and they’ve broken it all to pieces,” cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more, and when they got upstairs to the bedroom, Papa bear growled, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed,”

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, too,” said the Mama bear

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, and she’s still there!” exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. She screamed, “Help!” And she jumped up and ran out of the room. Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door, and ran away into the woods. And Goldilocks never returned to the home of the three bears.

Introduction: Show the children pictures. Tell there are 8 different types of bears. There are eight species in the bear family: The Asiatic Black Bear, Brown Bear, North American Black Bear, Panda Bear, Polar Bear, Sloth Bear, Spectacled Bear, and the Sun Bear.

Warm up: The warm up is a movement activity called “Does a Bear Live in the Woods?”

A clear space is needed. The teacher explains to the class that when they come across a bear in the woods they must lie down on the ground and keep very still. One child volunteers to be the bear. The bear goes to one end of the clear space and turns his/her back on the rest of the class. All the other children try to sneak up behind the bear. When the bear turns around all the children must lie very still on the ground. If the bear sees you, moving s/he pulls you away to join him/her. Then there are two bears. Eventually all the children are caught moving and become bears. 

Voice production:

Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices

Who has been sitting in my chair?

Who has eating my porridge?

Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:

Loud

Quiet

Fast

Slow

Sad

Happy

Angry

Excited

Surprised

Frightened

Annoyed

Role Play: “Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….

Walk as

Daddy bear

Mummy bear

Baby bear

Goldilocks

Grumpy daddy bear

Kind mummy bear

Happy baby bear

Surprised Goldilocks”.

Sculpting: Divide the class into pairs. One of the pair is the sculptor the other us the clay. Get the sculptor to mould the clay into

How  goldilocks felt when the bears found her. 

How did baby bear feel when he saw that his porridge had been eaten. 

How did mummy bear feel when she saw that someone had been sleeping in her bed. 

How daddy bear fell when he saw Goldilocks sleeping in the bed.  

It can be abstract. The teacher/children look at each sculpture and guess how the characters are feeling.

Movement Poetry:

When Goldilocks Went to the House of the Bears

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears, (The children walk on the spot.) Oh, what did her blue eyes see? (The children point to their eyes.)

A bowl that was huge and a bowl that was small and a bowl that was tiny and that was all. (Children make increasingly smaller shapes with their arms to represent each bowl.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (They use one finger to point – as if counting each bowl.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears, (Walk on the spot.)Oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A chair that was huge and a chair that was small, and a chair that was tiny and that was all. (Use hands to show the different heights and the size of each chair, getting smaller all the time.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (Use their fingers to point, as if counting each chair.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears, (Walk on the spot.) Oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A bed that was huge and a bed that was small and a bed that was tiny and that was all. (Use their hands to show the increasingly smaller length and size of each bed.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (Use their fingers to point, as if counting each bed.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears. (Walk on the spot.) Oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A bear that was huge and a bear that was small and a bear that was tiny and that was all. (Use hands to show the increasingly smaller height and size of each bear.)

Closure: The Bears are Coming

The teacher tells the children before we had the internet, cars, computers, trains, planes, washing machines, hoovers, people had to chop wood. Talk about type of jobs people did in the olden days. All the children then have to find some physical action, based on an old fashioned job like wood chopping, hunting, or washing clothes and begin doing this action somewhere in the room.

The teacher/volunteer then leaves the room momentarily and returns as the bear. Once the bear arrives, the children  must freeze where they are, and  the bear  must try to make the other children  laugh. If a child laughs they’ve come a bear and the bears work together until they have made everyone laugh. The bears cannot touch the frozen children!

For a variety of Goldilocks and the three bears books, click on Amazon.com

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – Movement story

Storytelling in the Early Years.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Drama strategies, Drama workshop for childre, Elements of Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Freeze Frame, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A drama workshop for children

 

 

image_2ecde2fa-3b51-4ab9-b4b8-d32ee2707fbeWarm up – Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices
Who has been sitting in my chair?
Who has eating my porridge?
Who has been sleeping in my bed.

Now get the children to say the lines the following ways:
Loud
Quiet
Fast
Slow
Sad
Happy
Angry
Excited
Surprised
Frightened
Annoyed

“Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze I will call out different ways of walking….
Walk as
Daddy bear
Mummy bear
Baby bear
Goldilocks
Grumpy daddy bear
Kind mummy bear
Happy baby bear
Surprised Goldilocks”.

Main Focus:
Read the movement story Goldilocks and the three bears. Click on the link.

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

When Goldilocks went to the house of the Bears – movement poetry. Click on the link below.

Action Poems for Young Children – Movement

Closure: In groups of 4 make a still image of your favorite scene. Present your still image to the rest of the class.

For more drama activities for young children, click here.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – Movement story

Storytelling in the Early Years.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Drama Activities for children, drama for kids, Drama workshop for childre, English teaching games, Esl, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Body/self awareness Movement Activities

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Game: Colour Jump

Instructions: Ask the children to look at their clothing. Ask them to notice the colors they are wearing. Tell the children that when you name a color they are wearing, they will jump up and then sit back down. Be sure the children have enough space to move without hurting other children. If your space is limited, they can all stand and then hop when their color is called. Call out one color. Help children by drawing attention to the colors they are wearing. Example: “Mara, is that red on your shirt?”

Game: Alphabet Jump

Instructions: Tell the children that you are going to name a letter of the alphabet. When a child’s name begins with that letter, that child can jump up and then sit back down. Recite the alphabet, and pause when you reach a letter that begins a child’s name. If that child hesitates, repeat the letter and look at the child. You can prompt a child by saying, “B. B. I think Bryan starts with B.” If a child jumps on the wrong letter, say, “Oops, Janna, you jumped to

Game:The Shake it Song

Instructions: As you sing this little song, move your body with the words. (i.e. when you say “shake it high!” shake your arms and head up high. When you say/sing “shake it low”, bend down and shake your body in a low crouched or squat position – a pile for my ballet trained friends!)

SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
SHAKE, SHAKE, SHAKE
Shake it HIGH!
Shake it LOW.
Shake it all about!

(repeat at least 3X)

You can choose to turn around when you sing “Shake it all about” – or you can simply shake your whole body. Allow whatever movement happens freely as you play with your child. Sing the song at least three times. You really want to get into the fun like to end my 3-4 and 5-6 classes with what I call “body awareness freeze game”. So it’s like freeze dance except no one’s out if they move during a freeze moment. Instead, I shout out directions every time the music stops. There are two categories: directions that affect how they move, and directions that will affect the shape they will form with their bodies when the music stops.

For example, I may say: “until the music stops you will make a hand dance” and dance mostly with their hands. Then the music stops and I say “Now you will make a shoulder dance”. etc.
With the other variation, I let them dance however they want, and then I say “Next time the music stops I want you to make straight lines with your arms and legs” and then they do it when the music stops. Then I give them something else “Next time the music stops you have to have one foot and one hand in the air”… It can be anything really, I just want them to be creative and start problem solving with their bodies… When there’s a holiday coming up I ask them to shape their body like a star, like a Christmas tree, or like a heart for valentine’s day. They love it and that way they are still developing skills and body awareness while having crazy loads of fun!

For more movement games and activities, click here.

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

Movement Story -Adventure in Space

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The Gruffalo – Drama Workshop