Posted in Action Poems, buddha stories, Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama for children, drama for kids, Panchatantra plays, Plays, plays about destiny, Plays about graditude, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, The Buddha and the angry man, the Buddha and the beggar man

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

 

 


Characters: Two storytellers, Beggar Man, Mouse, Man, Woman, Daughter, Wizard, Giant Turtle and Buddha.


Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there was a homeless man who begged every day for food.
(People pass by and give him food.)
Beggar Man: I’m so lucky that kind people give me food.
(Beggar Man falls asleep and mouse creeps up and steals his food. The Beggar Man wakes up suddenly and sees the mouse.)
Beggar Man: Mouse, why are you stealing my food. I’m just a poor beggar man.
Mouse: I’m doing you a favour because no matter how much you beg or how generous people are, you will never be allowed to keep more than eight items.
Beggar Man: You has decided that I can’t ow more than eight items.
Mouse: The Buddha has decided.
Beggar Man: But why me?
Mouse: Why don’t you go find him and ask him.
(Mouse scampers off with the food.)
Beggar Man: Well, I better go find the Buddha and ask him why I’m not allowed to possess more than eight items.
Storyteller 2: So the beggar man gathered his few belongings and went on a journey to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He travelled all day. As night fell, he grew cold and hungry.
Beggar Man: There is no sign of the Buddha. I’m tired and hungry. There is a light over there. Perhaps if I knock on the door, they may let me stay for the night.
(He Knocks on the door. A man opens the door with a warm smile.)
Beggar Man: I’m cold and hungry, please can I stay the night?
Man: Of course, Please come in.
Woman: Sit down and have some food with us.
(He enters the house and sits down on a table with the Man, woman and their daughter.)
Man: Where are you going at this time at night?
Beggar Man: I’m going to find the Buddha. I’ve a very important question to ask him. I just need a good night’s sleep and I’ll be on my way early in the morning.
(Man and woman look at each other.)
Woman: We have a question for you to ask the Buddha.
Man: Our daughter can’t speak. Please ask the Buddha what we need to do hear her beautiful voice.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll ask the Buddha your question. Thanks you for the food and bed.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man continues on his way and his quest to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He comes across a range of mountains.
Beggar Man: Oh dear, the mountains look to difficult to climb but I really need to find the Buddha to ask my questions.
(He starts to climb the mountains.)
Beggar Man: This is very difficult. I will never make it. (he sits downs and starts to weep.)
(Enters wizard.)
Wizard: What’s the matter, young man? Why are you crying?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha but I can’t climb these mountains. I’ll never find him now.
Wizard: I’ll help you. We can use my magic to fly over the mountain come with me.
Storyteller 2: Wizard used his staff’s magic to fly the beggar man and himself across the mountains.
Beggar Man: Thank you so much, wizard. I’d have never made if it wasn’t for you.
Wizard: You are welcome but can I ask you a favour.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll do anything to show my gratitude.
Wizard: Can you ask the Buddha what do I have to do to get to heaven. I’ve been trying to get there for a thousand years.
(The beggar man nods his head and they hug and the wizard hops on his staff and flies off.)
Storyteller 1: The beggar man continues on his journey and comes across a river.
Beggar Man: I don’t believe this. How am I going to get across the river? (he sighs)
(Enters Giant Turtle.)
Giant Turtle: You look sad. What’s the matter?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha and I can’t get across the river to find him.
Giant Turtle: Jump on my back and I’ll swim across. (The beggar man jumps on the Giant Turtle’s back and they swim across the river.
Beggar Man: Thank you, Giant Turtle. How can I repay you?
Giant Turtle: Can you ask the Buddha a question for me?
Beggar Man: Of course, what is your question?
Giant Turtle: Ask the Buddha why I haven’t become a dragon. I’ve been trying to become a dragon for 500 years.
(Beggar Man nods and hugs the giant turtle.)
Storyteller 2: Eventually the beggar man finds the Buddha under the Bodhi Tree.
Beggar Man: I’m so glad. I’ve found you. I’ve got so many question to ask you.
Buddha: I will only answer three questions.
Beggar Man: But I’ve four questions to ask and they all very important.
Buddha: Ask yourself, are they equally important?
Storyteller 1: The beggar man thought very carefully.
Beggar Man: Well, the giant turtle is trying to be a dragon for fifty years. The wizard has trying to go to heaven for 1000 years. The young girl will be unable to speak for the rest of her life if I don’t ask her question. I’m just a homeless beggar. I can go back and continue begging. My question is the least important by far.
(Beggar Man goes back to the Buddha.)
Beggar Man: My first question is how can the turtle become a dragon?
Buddha: Simple, he needs to leave the comfort of his own shell, unless he does that he will never be a dragon.
Beggar Man: My second question is how can the wizard go to heaven?
Buddha: He must put down his magic staff as it keeps him on earth. The moment he puts it down he will be free to go to heaven.
Beggar Man: My third question how can the young girl speak.
Buddha: She will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Beggar Man: Thank you for answering my questions.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man turned around and started his journey home. He meets the Giant Turtle.
Giant Turtle: Hey Beggar man, did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Take off your shell and you will become a dragon.
(Giant Turtle takes off his shell.)
Giant Turtle: I’ve this priceless pearls in my shell. Here take them. I won’t need them anymore because I’m a dragon. Good bye and good luck.)
(The dragon flies off.)
(Enters the wizard.)
Wizard: Did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Put your staff down and you can go to heaven.
Wizard: Here take my staff, Use its power wisely. Thank you.
(The wizard ascends into heaven.)
Beggar Man: I now I’ve wealth from the turtle and power from the wizard. He hops on the staff and makes his way back tom the family that gave him food and shelter.
Man: Hello, did you ask the Buddha our question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Your daughter will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Daughter: Hello, you are the man that was here last week.
Woman: Looks like you found your soulmate.
(Daughter and beggar man hug.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story if you do good, you will be repaid.

 

If we’re willing to lend a hand to those who are struggling more than us, willing to help them, it may change the course of your life, your destiny. And the universe may repay you in such a way that you never would have imagined.

For more plays based on Buddha stories click here.

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

 

 

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, Plays that teach emotions, The Buddha and the angry man

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

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The Buddha and the Angry Man

(How to handle an insult)

Characters:  Storyteller, Buddha, Angry Man.

Storyteller: One day, the Buddha was walking from village to village to spread love and compassionate. (He walks slowly, looking around taking in the wonders of his surroundings.)

Buddha: What a lovely, sunny day it is for a walk.

(Suddenly, an angry man runs towards him, waving his fists.)

Angry Man: Who do you think you are?

Buddha: Whatever is the matter?

Angry Man: You that’s what is the matter, you walk around, thinking you know everything to teach goodness and love. You are just a fake, silly man in an orange robe.

Buddha: Come sit with me. (He guides towards a tree and they sit in the shade.)

Angry Man: (confused)

Why are you not angry with my insult?

Buddha: I’ve a question for you.

Angry Man: What?

Buddha: If you buy a present for someone and that person doesn’t want it then whom does the present belong to?

Angry Man: What a strange question. Me, of course, I bought the present.

Buddha: That’s right and its exactly the same with your anger.

Angry Man: That makes no sense.

Buddha: It’s very clear, if you become angry with me and I do not accept your anger then it falls back on you and all you succeed in doing is hurt yourself more.

Angry Man: What should I do?

Buddha: Rid yourself of your anger and become a more a loving person.

Angry Man: I will try. Thank you for teaching me this lesson. (They hug and wave goodbye to one another.)

Storyteller: The moral of story is when you have hate and anger towards other people only you are unhappy.

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Fox and the Crow – A Five Minute Play for Chldren

Characters: Three storytellers, fox, crow, mice, dogs, cows, horses. You can have as many mice, dogs, cows and horses as you wish.
Storyteller 1: One day a crow was out searching for some food.

(Crow is flying around the stage looking for food.)

Storyteller 2: She came across a nice piece of cheese.
(She stops as she spots some cheese and she swoops down to get it.)
Storyteller 3: She grabbed the cheese with her beak and said…
Crow: What a lovely piece of cheese! I will keep it all for myself and not share it with anyone.
Storyteller 1: She flew to the top of the tree.
Storyteller 2: After a while some mice came along. They squeaked…
Mice: Squeak, squeak, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The mice were sad and hungry so they scampered off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then some dogs came along. They barked …
Dogs: Woof, woof, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 2: The dogs were sad and hungry so they bounded off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 3: A few minutes later some cows passed by. They mooed …
Cows: Moo, moo, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 1: The cows were sad and hungry so they walked off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 2: Finally, some horses came along. They neighed …
Horses: Neigh, neigh, Crow please share your cheese with us.
Crow: Oh no, I will not share my cheese with you.
Storyteller 3: The horses were sad and hungry so they galloped off looking for food in the woods.
Storyteller 1: Then along came a fox. He said to himself…
(Fox faces the audience.)
Fox: That cheese looks delicious and it would be perfect for my breakfast.
Storyteller 2: Then he had an idea.
Fox: Good Morning Crow, you beautiful bird.
Crow: I’m not stupid. I know what you want.
Fox: All I want is to hear you sing. You must be queen of all the birds and your voice must be beautiful. I would love to hear you, but maybe I’m wrong. (The fox turns to leave.)
Storyteller 3: The crow was very flattered.
Crow: Wait Fox, come back. I’ll show you how beautifully I can sing.
Storyteller 1: She opened her mouth and began to caw.
Crow: Caw, Caw, Caw.
Storyteller 2: The cheese fell out of her mouth and onto the ground. The fox picked it up quickly.
Fox: Thanks very much. (He swallows the cheese and licks his lips.) Crow, I tricked you.
Storyteller 3: Off the fox went into the woods looking for another breakfast.
Storytellers: The lesson of this story is beware of people who flatter you.

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.

For more plays click on the links below.

The Money Pig

The Ants and the Grasshopper

Chinese New Year

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories

The Monkey and the Jealous Camel


The Monkey and the Jealous Camel

Characters: Three storytellers, Monkey, Giraffe, Lion, Kangaroo, Crocodile, Penguin, Monkey, Camel, Frog, Pig, Squirrel, Ant.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time a long time ago.
Storyteller 2: All the animals in the world decided to have a big party to celebrate the midsummer.
Storyteller 3: It was a midsummer party and all the animals in the world were going.
Storyteller 1: From the tiniest ant to the enormous elephant.
Storyteller 2: The animals arrived Two by two.
(Everyone sings the animals arrived two by two hurrah hurrah.)
Storyteller 3: Eventually, all the animals had arrived.
(Monkey is ticking off the all the names as the animals enter. He has a click board and looks very official. Giraffe is the look out.)
Monkey: Is that everyone?
Giraffe: I think so, I can’t see anyone else coming.
Lion: Well, let’s get this party started. Welcome, everyone to this party to celebrate the
midsummer. I hope everyone will have wonderful time tonight. I want to introduce the band. Back by popular demand all the way from the Jungle. I would like to introduce our band- the animals.
(Everyone cheers, and claps Elephant is playing her trumpet with his trunk, the bear is playing the drums with his feet. Other animal musical instruments.)
Storyteller 1: Everyone danced and chatted and had a merry time.
(Music playing.)
Kangaroo: Stop the music. I just noticed that the camel isn’t here.
Crocodile: Never mind him, he is so grumpy.
Penguin: He couldn’t be bothered coming.
Giraffe: No wait, I see something coming up in the hill in the distance.
(Monkey climbs up the tree.)
Monkey: It is the camel and he doesn’t look very happy.
(The camel trundles up the hill very slowly)
Penguin: We should be very welcoming to him, when he arrives.
(Camel eventually makes his way up the hill.)
Animals: Hello Camel, welcome to the midsummer’s eve party.
Lion: Come and join us.
Camel: (sighs and wipes his brow.) This better be a good party. I have come an awfully long way.
Frog: It will be wonderful. Let’s play a game of leap frog,
(All the animals jump over one another.)
Pig: That was fun but now let’s play piggy in the middle.
(All the animals throw a ball and the pig tries to catch it.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone had so much fun.
Storyteller 3: Then the dolphins performed a lovely water display.
(Music is playing.)
Monkey: now it my turn to show my contemporary dance.
Storyteller 1: The monkey danced, and all the other animals were impressed.
(All the animals cheer and clap when the monkey is finished.)
Pig: That was amazing.
Frog: You are such a good dancer,
Camel: Harrumph! What’s all the clapping and cheering about. Anyone can dance like that.
Kangaroo: That’s not true. The monkey is a very good dancer.
Ant: You are such a grumpy all hump, Camel.
Elephant: You are just jealous Camel, everyone knows camels can’t dance.
Camel: Of course, Camels can dance.
Monkey: Go on then, show us how camels can dance.
(The Camel slowly makes his way to the middle of the circle. All the animals are staring at him and there is a deafening silence.)
Penguin: Band, Music please.
Storyteller 1: The band started to play, and the camel started to dance.
Storyteller 2: It was the most peculiar dance they had ever seen.
(Camel gives a sideways hop and wiggle and then falls over and he bashes into the band and the music stops.)
Squirrel: Watch where you are going.
(The camel does a high kick and hits the kangaroo.)
Kangaroo: Ouch. (Kangaroo starts limping.)
Storyteller 3: The camel swings his tail and the rabbit is knocked to the floor.
Storyteller 1: Then, he nearly trod on the ants.
Ant/s: Oh, my goodness. Somebody stop him before he kills us.
(The camel is so clumsy that all the animals scatter to the far side of the stage.)
Lion: (roars) Stop! Stop Camel.
Camel: But I’m in the middle of my dance. Can’t you see I’m the best dancer here.
Storyteller 1: Then, the unimaginable happened.
Storyteller 2: He stood on the lion’s tail.
Lion: (roars).
(All the animals freeze.)
Camel: Is it just me? But I get the feeling you didn’t like my dance Lion. (Looks around.) why is anyone clapping.
Pig: Your dancing is ……horrible.
Camel:(hangs his head) I must admit that it wasn’t as fun as the monkey’s dance. (Looks at the monkey) You dance very well, Monkey.
Monkey: Thank you. You have special talents too. You can walk for miles without water and you can give everyone rides on your hump.
Kangaroo: Everyone has a talent.
Lion: The world would be a strange place if we all good at the same thing.
Camel: I guess you are right. Well who would like on my hump.
All animals: Me.
Camel: Hop on then.
Storyteller 1: The camel smiled with pride and pleasure.
Storyteller 2: The moral of the story is
Storyteller 3: Everyone is good at something.

For more animal plays for children click here.

The Thirsty Crow – A 5 minute Playscript for children

The Lion and the Clever Rabbit – A Simple Play for Children.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years

The Tortoise and the Eagle

Characters: Two storytellers, tortoise, eagle, snail, squirrel, rabbit, crow, dove, robin.

Storyteller 1: There once was a tortoise that lived in a wood.

Storyteller 2: He was never happy.

Tortoise: I’m so bored. All I do all day is plod along. If only I could fly like the birds up in the sky.

(Birds come on stage and fly around. The tortoise looks at them with envy.)

Snail: Tortoise, why are you never happy. You have lots of things to be grateful for.

Tortoise: Like what?

Snail: You have a big hard shell.

Squirrel: You have lots of friends in the woods.

Rabbit: None of us can fly and we are not bored.

Storyteller 1: The tortoise sighed and said…

Tortoise: I don’t like being stuck on the ground. I think, I will ask the birds to help me. Birds, birds, could one of you take me up into the sky so I can see the wonders of the world.

(The crow flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Crow, crow, please help me fly.

Crow: No, I will not help you fly. You are too heavy. (Crow flies off.)

(Dove flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Dove, dove, please help me fly.

Dove: No I will not help you fly. You have no feathers, you aren’t meant to fly. (Dove flies away.)

(Robin flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Robin, robin, please help me fly.

Robin: No, I will not help you fly. It is too dangerous. (Robin flies away.)

(Eagle flies down to meet the tortoise.)

Tortoise: Eagle, eagle, please help me fly.

Eagle: I will help you fly.

(The eagle picks up the tortoise with his talons and starts to fly.)

Storyteller 2: The tortoise was so frightened he closed his eyes really tightly.

Eagle: Tortoise, you must open your eyes if you want to see the wonders of the world.

Tortoise: I can’t open my eyes. I’m too scared. Eagle, please put me down.

(The eagle puts the tortoise down and flies off. The tortoise starts crying.)

Storytellers: The moral of the story is be careful what you wish for.

For more animal plays for children click here.

The Lion and the Mouse – five minute play

The Hare and the tortoise – A play for children

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Aesop’s Fables

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About Aesop:
Aesop was an ancient Greek storyteller who was is believed to have lived around 500 B.C. He was a Phrygian slave. He was owned by two different masters before gaining his freedom due to his intelligence. He went from place to place telling his fables to the masses however it is also widely believed that he did not write most of them, he just collected them. Aesop’s fables were used to offer advice to their audience. He supposedly met his death by being thrown a cliff at Delphi for being ugly and deformed. Over the centuries Aesop’s fables have been rewritten, illustrated and translated into every language in the world.

About Fables:
A fable is a short story. Fables typically involve animals with human like qualities. Usually in a fable, the time and the place are unspecified. Often fables illustrate how smaller and weaker characters use their intelligence to defeat the bigger and more powerful characters. There is always a hero, a villain, a character with a weakness and most importantly a moral. A moral is a lifelong lesson.

The most common characters found in fables are:
Rabbit
Fox
Crow
Bear
Rooster
Duck
Pig
Eagle
Hen
Wolf
Monkey
Donkey
Mouse
Rat
Cow
Goose
Lion
Boy
Girl.

There are always good characters and evil characters.
Examples of good characters:

Mouse
Kitten
Bunny
Cow.
Examples of evil characters:
Snake
Lion
Rat
Bear.

Write your own fable:

Title:

Characters:
Hero:

Villain:

Character with a weakness:


Setting:


Problem:


Solution:


Trickery:


Moral:

The Lion and Mouse

A Lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little Mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the Lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the Lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her.

“Spare me!” begged the poor Mouse. “Please let me go and some day I will surely repay you.”

The Lion was much amused to think that a Mouse could ever help him. But he was generous and finally let the Mouse go.

Some days later, while stalking his prey in the forest, the Lion was caught in the toils of a hunter’s net. Unable to free himself, he filled the forest with his angry roaring. The Mouse knew the voice and quickly found the Lion struggling in the net. Running to one of the great ropes that bound him, she gnawed it until it parted, and soon the Lion was free.

“You laughed when I said I would repay you,” said the Mouse. “Now you see that even a Mouse can help a Lion.”

“A kindness is never wasted”

Click here for more children’s plays based on Aesop’s fables.

The lion and the mouse – a drama workshop for children.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Hans Christian Andersen, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Snow White, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Enormous Turnip, The Little Mermaid, The three billy goats gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

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Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

Characters: Three storytellers, Goldilocks, three bears, three bowls, three chairs, three beds.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a little house in the woods.
Storyteller 2: There was Daddy Bear, there was Mummy Bear and there was Baby Bear.
Storyteller 3: One fine day, they decided to go for a walk.
Daddy Bear: What a lovely sunny day it is today. Let’s all go to the woods.
Baby Bear: I’m hungry. I want to eat my porridge.
Mummy Bear: The porridge is still hot; it will be cool enough by the time we come back from our walk.
Storyteller 1: So, off they went on their walk.
Storyteller 2: Just then, a little girl called Goldilocks was walking in the woods.
Storyteller 3: She was picking flowers for her grandma.
Storyteller 1: She stopped suddenly and saw a pretty little house.
Goldilocks: Oh, what a pretty little house. I am feeling a little tired and hungry. I wonder if whoever lives here will let me rest for a few moments and give me something to eat (She knocks on the door.) There is no answer…. (She opens the door slowly and goes inside.)
Goldilocks: Oh look, three bowls of porridge.
Bowl 1: Eat me! I have lots of salt on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too salty.
Bowl 2: I have lots of sugar on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too sugary.
Bowl 3: Eat me! I’m just right. (Goldilocks eats some and likes it and continues eating it until all the porridge is gone.)
Goldilocks: Mmmmmm, that was just right. Oh look, three chairs. I think I’ll sit down for a moment.
Chair 1: Sit on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too hard.
Chair 2: Sit on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too soft.
Chair 3: Sit on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and makes herself comfortable.)
Goldilocks: This chair is just right. Oh dear, I’ve broken the chair.
Storyteller 2: Goldilocks decided to walk upstairs.
Storyteller 3: She saw three beds.
Bed 1: Lie on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too hard.
Bed 2: Lie on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too soft.
Bed 3: Lie on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and stays there.)
Goldilocks: This bed is just right.
Storyteller 1: Goldilocks fell fast asleep.
Storyteller 2: After a while, the three bears came back from their walk.
Storyteller 3: They walked in to the house and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been eating my porridge? Look, it is all gone!
Storyteller 3: They saw the chairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair? Look, it’s broken!
Storyteller 3: They walked upstairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed? And look, she is still there!
Storyteller 3: Goldilocks woke and screamed.
Storyteller 1: She jumped out of bed and ran down the stairs and out of the house.
Storyteller 2: The three bears never saw her again
Storytellers: The end.

For more play scripts based on Fairytales, click here.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Workshop for children.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, fables, Fairy Tales, Legends, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years

Androcles and the Lion – A five minute playscript for children

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Androcles and the Lion – A five minute playscript for children

Characters: Two storytellers, Androcles, Lion, Emperor, three slaves, three roman guards and as many spectators as you wish.

Storyteller 1: A long, long time ago when the Romans ruled the world.
Storyteller 2: There lived a slave called Androcles.
(Androcles walks on the stage and addresses the audience.)
Androcles: Hello everyone, I’m Androcles. I’m a slave. Life is not so good when you are a slave. I work hard and I’m always hungry. (He mimes digging and he wipes his brow.)
(Enter slaves and guards. The slaves mime doing manual jobs while the guards observe.)
Guard 1: Slaves, work harder. Any slacking and you will be fed to the hungry lions in the arena.
Androcles: I can’t take this life anymore.
Slave 1: Androcles, we are slaves.
Slave 2: We must do as the Romans tell us.
Slave 3: You should learn to accept your fate.
Androcles: I don’t want to accept this terrible life. I’m going to escape. I need you to cause a distraction.
Slave 1: I’ll do it. (He collapses in pain and the guards run towards him.)
Guard 2: Stop that noise at once.
Guard 3: What is the matter with you?
Slave 1: I’ve twisted my ankle.
Slave 2: Go now and good luck.
Slave 3: Don’t get caught or else you will be fed to the lions in the arena.
(They hug quickly and Androcles escapes without the guards noticing.)
Storyteller 1: Androcles jumped over the wall.
Storyteller 2: And ran through the forest.
Androcles: I’m exhausted. (He stretches, yawns and looks around.) This looks like a good place to sleep.
Storyteller 1: Androcles was just about to lie down when he heard a loud roar.
Lion: Roarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
Androcles: It’s a lion. Oh dear, he looks very angry.
Lion: I’m not angry. I’ve got this thorn stuck in my paw. I’m in pain. Roarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
Androcles: I’ll help you.
Storyteller 2: Androcles pulled the thorn out of the Lion’s paw.
Androcles: There you go. I’ll put some leaves on it to keep it dry.
Lion: Thank you so much I was in so much pain. Maybe one day I’ll return your good deed.
Storyteller 1: Years passed but one-day Androcles’ luck ran out. (Androcles is casually walking around the stage.)
Guard 1: Caught you at last.
Guard 2: Your luck has finally run out.
Guard 3: The emperor is very angry with you.
(Enter Emperor.)
Emperor: Slave, you are going to pay for escaping. Guards, take him to the arena and throw him to the lions. I could do with something to amuse me.
(Guards throw Androcles into the arena.)
Guard 1: Enjoy.
Guard 2: See you later.
Guard 3: Ha, ha I doubt we will ever see him again, alive.
Storyteller 2: Androcles waited in the arena for the trapdoor to open. The crowd cheered loudly.
Androcles: This is the end for me. I’ll just close my eyes. I hope it will be quick.
(The trapdoor open and the lion comes out roaring but then he sees Androcles with his eyes closed.)
Spectators: Kill him, kill him, kill him.
(The lion walks slowly towards Androcles whose eyes are still firmly shut.)
Lion: Open your eyes, Androcles.
Androcles: No, just eat me and get it over with.
Spectators: Kill him, kill him, kill him.
Lion: Androcles, it is I the lion you helped in the forest. I would never eat you.
Storyteller 1: Androcles slowly opens his eyes.
Androcles: Hello, my friend. (They hug.)
(The spectators cheer)
Emperor: Androcles, you have made friends with a fierce creature. Your reward is your freedom.
Androcles: Emperor, thank you. (Androcles bows.)
Storyteller 2: The Lion and Androcles lived to a ripe old age and remained friends.
(They hug and wave at the crowd.)

Androcles and the Lion – A five minute playscript for children

For more plays based on animal stories click here.

Other links:

Thumbelina – a play script

 

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl, expressive arts, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Rhyming Tales – The Lion and the Mouse

A king lion and a mouse under the tree

Rhyming Tales
The following poem can be used in a variety of ways: The practionner could read it at story time or the children could act out or mime the different parts for fun or in front of an audience. They could also be recited. Each child could learn four lines each and they could recite it as a choral piece. These stories help children with their vocal expression and give them an understanding of rhythm.

The Lion and the Mouse
There was a lion who lived in a cave.
He was extremely big and terribly brave.
The lion was not frightened of anything
Because he was the fearsome jungle king.
One day he was asleep near his house
When he was woken by a little mouse.
The lion grabbed the mouse with his large paw
He licked his lips and opened his wide jaw.-
The little mouse looked at him with sheer dread –
He didn’t want to be some scrumptious spread. –
“Squeak, squeak, Mr. Lion do not eat me
Some day I will help you so let me be.”
“You help me,” he said “I don’t think so
But I’m not that hungry, so off you go.”
One day while hunting deep in the jungle
The lion tripped over and took a tumble.
Suddenly he was stuck in an evil trap
The other animals began to clap.
He saw some grey elephants and he cried:
“Elephants, please help me I’ve swallowed my pride.”
“Oh Mr. Lion we will not help you
So how does it feel to be in a stew?”
The elephants said with extreme delight
And off they trundled into the dark night.
The lion waited and a few hours passed
Then out of the blue he saw some giraffes
“Giraffes, Giraffes,” he said, “please, please help me.”
The Giraffes looked at him and decided to flee.
He was extremely hungry and very cold
He was terribly tired and feeling less bold.
When all of a sudden down by the lake
He heard the hissing of a slimy snake.
“Snake, please, please help me I’m stuck in a trap,
I feel confused and I’m all in a flap.”
The snake hissed: “Jungle King I must admit,
You really do look like a proper twit.”
Snake laughed and laughed and felt real good
And away he slithered into the deep wood.
The Lion felt a sense of despair’
He was stuck outside in the cold night air.
Then all of a sudden out from his house
Came the patter of the little brown mouse.
“Pardon Lion I’m not one for prying
But please tell me why you are crying?”
The lion told the mouse his whole story
In all its wondrous gruesome glory.
The little mouse began to gnaw and gnaw
The scary lion sat there full of great awe.
At last, the lion roared: “I’m FREE I’m free.”
With that he invited the mouse home for tea.

 

Posted in creative arts, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Monkey and the Crocodile – A playscript for children

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Characters: Three storytellers, the crocodile, the crocodile’s wife and the monkey.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a crocodile that lived in the river Ganges in India.
(Crocodile enters stage swimming slowly.)
Storyteller 2: On both sides of the Ganges there were large music fruit trees.
Storyteller 3: A monkey lived in one of the trees. He ate fruit all day.
(Monkey mimes eating fruit.)
Monkey: These fruits are so delicious and juicy I’m so lucky to live in a fruit tree.
(Crocodile sits under the tree for shade.)
Crocodile: It is very hot I think I will sit under this tree and sleep in the shade. (Looks up.) The fruits on tree look so delicious. I wish I could climb the tree and pick some.
Monkey: (climbs down from the tree) Since you are resting under my tree, you are my guest. Please come and taste some of my delicious fruits.
Storyteller 1: The monkey plucked the juiciest fruit off the tree and gave it to the crocodile.
Crocodile: Oh thank you Monkey you are so kind.
Monkey: You are welcome. Come again, any time.
Storyteller 2: Soon, the crocodile came every day. They would eat the fruit and talk to one another for hours.
(Crocodile and the monkey mime having a conversation and eating lots of fruits.)
Storyteller 3: One day as the crocodile was leaving to swim home. The monkey gave him some fruit.
Monkey: Crocodile give these fruits to your wife. I plucked them especially for her.
Storyteller 1: The crocodile swam home and gave the fruit to his wife, She was very happy.
(Crocodile swims home and gives his wife the fruit.)
Crocodile’s wife: These fruits are delicious. I have never tasted such sweet fruit in all my life. Where did you get them from?
Crocodile: I got them from my friend the monkey. He lives in the fruit tree so he knows which ones are the sweetest.
Crocodile’s wife: Does the monkey eat fruit every day?
Crocodile: Yes, only the sweetest and juiciest ones. Why do you ask?
Crocodile’s wife: Because that means his heart must be so sweet. If I eat his heart I would remain young and beautiful forever. You must steal the monkey’s heart and give it to me.
Crocodile: But he is my good friend. He is my only friend. It would be unfair for me to steal his heart.
Crocodile’s wife: (gets angry) If you loved me you would do it.
Crocodile: Do not get anger my dear, I will do as you wish.
Storyteller 2: The next day the crocodile swam to the riverbank and reached the tree where the monkey lived.
Monkey: Crocodile, you are late today. I thought you weren’t coming.
Crocodile: My wife has made a meal for you. She has invited you to tea because she wants to thank you for giving her your beautiful sweet fruit.
Monkey: That’s very kind of her but I’m a land animal, I can’t swim.
Crocodile: We live on a sand bank just jump on my back and I’ll take you there.
Storyteller 3: The monkey hopped on the crocodile’s back and away they went.
Monkey: Slow down, Croc. You are going too fast.
Crocodile: I’m sorry Monkey but I have to go fast because my wife wants to eat your heart for her tea.
Monkey: Oh Croc, you should have told me this before we left. I always keep my heart in the hollow of the tree for safe keeping.
Crocodile: I’ll take you back to the tree and you can collect your heart.
Monkey: That would be great.
Storyteller 1: Crocodile turns and swims back to the tree where the monkey lives upon reaching the bank the monkey jumps off the crocodiles back and clambers up the tree. After a while the crocodile says…..
Crocodile: Monkey, you must have found your heart by now. My wife will get angry if we don’t arrive soon.
Monkey: You are so foolish crocodile. Don’t you know your heart is within yourself? It was a trick to save my life. Now leave my tree and never come back again.
Storyteller 2: The crocodile left empty handed.
(Crocodile’s wife looks very angry.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story is at times presence of mind pays well.

For more plays based on animal stories click  here.