Posted in Circle games, Closure activities, co-operation, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama

Teach English through Drama Games

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Drama games are a perfect tool to use in any classroom that encompasses
multiple learning styles, ability levels and age groups in addition, the activities in this book help ESL students to access active language in an effective and imaginative way. The activities in this
book facilitate students’ ability to learn in different ways as visual learners, auditory learners and kinaesthetic learners. 
Here are a few fun, challenging and rewarding drama games.

Game: The Fishing Game
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The focus of this game is to practice directions. It will also help students to become familiar with different types of fish.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: The students sit in a circle. The teacher goes around circle and gives each student a fish name such as a dog fish, sun fish, star fish, and cat fish. Then, the teacher chooses one type of fish and the students that are assigned that fish move around the outside of the circle to instructions like high seas- stretching as high as they can, low seas- crouching as low as they can, choppy seas- jumping or hopping, change direction, and then when the teacher calls ‘shark is coming’ they must run back as quickly as they can to their place in the circle. Repeat until all the fish have got a chance.

Game: World’s Greatest Sandwich
Level: Elementary
Other benefits: This is an excellent concentration and memory game. It will help to extend and explore vocabulary.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: This is an activity can be used as a getting to know you activity as well as giving the students an opportunity to practice specific vocabulary. The students sit in a circle the first-person starts.
Student A: Hi my name is Adam and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs in it.
Student B: Hi my name is Betty and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs and bananas in it.
Student C: Hi my name is Carol and the world’s greatest sandwich has eggs, bananas and pickles in it
Everyone in the circle gets a chance. If they make a mistake or pause too long they are out. The game keeps going until there is only one person left.
Extension: This game could be used to practice other types of vocabulary.
Examples:
• The world greatest zoo has …………. (zoo)
• The world’s greatest rainbow has ………… (colours)
• The world greatest orchestra has ………… (musical instruments)

Game: I Like but I don’t Like
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This game helps to promote the students’ creativity. It also focuses on negatives.
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Go around the circle and each student says what they like and what they don’t like. You can make it more difficult by getting them to say items that start with the first letter of their name.
For example: Hi my name is Julie. I like …. Jellies but I don’t like…. Jam.
After everyone has had a chance to say what their likes and dislikes are the students stand in a circle. A volunteer is chosen and he calls out the name of another student across the circle. As he walks towards them he must call their likes and dislikes. The chosen student chooses someone else and walks towards them calling out their likes and dislikes and so on until everyone has had a chance.

For more Drama Games you can use in the classroom, click on the link here.

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

Some Improvisation Activities for ESL Students.

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Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Hans Christian Andersen, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Snow White, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Enormous Turnip, The Little Mermaid, The three billy goats gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

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Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

Characters: Three storytellers, Goldilocks, three bears, three bowls, three chairs, three beds.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a little house in the woods.
Storyteller 2: There was Daddy Bear, there was Mummy Bear and there was Baby Bear.
Storyteller 3: One fine day, they decided to go for a walk.
Daddy Bear: What a lovely sunny day it is today. Let’s all go to the woods.
Baby Bear: I’m hungry. I want to eat my porridge.
Mummy Bear: The porridge is still hot; it will be cool enough by the time we come back from our walk.
Storyteller 1: So, off they went on their walk.
Storyteller 2: Just then, a little girl called Goldilocks was walking in the woods.
Storyteller 3: She was picking flowers for her grandma.
Storyteller 1: She stopped suddenly and saw a pretty little house.
Goldilocks: Oh, what a pretty little house. I am feeling a little tired and hungry. I wonder if whoever lives here will let me rest for a few moments and give me something to eat (She knocks on the door.) There is no answer…. (She opens the door slowly and goes inside.)
Goldilocks: Oh look, three bowls of porridge.
Bowl 1: Eat me! I have lots of salt on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too salty.
Bowl 2: I have lots of sugar on me. (Goldilocks eats some but spits it out.)
Goldilocks: Yuck! You are too sugary.
Bowl 3: Eat me! I’m just right. (Goldilocks eats some and likes it and continues eating it until all the porridge is gone.)
Goldilocks: Mmmmmm, that was just right. Oh look, three chairs. I think I’ll sit down for a moment.
Chair 1: Sit on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too hard.
Chair 2: Sit on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and jumps up straight away.)
Goldilocks: This chair is too soft.
Chair 3: Sit on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks goes to sit down and makes herself comfortable.)
Goldilocks: This chair is just right. Oh dear, I’ve broken the chair.
Storyteller 2: Goldilocks decided to walk upstairs.
Storyteller 3: She saw three beds.
Bed 1: Lie on me. I’m very hard. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too hard.
Bed 2: Lie on me. I’m very soft. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and suddenly jumps up.)
Goldilocks: This bed is too soft.
Bed 3: Lie on me. I’m just right. (Goldilocks lies down on the bed and stays there.)
Goldilocks: This bed is just right.
Storyteller 1: Goldilocks fell fast asleep.
Storyteller 2: After a while, the three bears came back from their walk.
Storyteller 3: They walked in to the house and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been eating my porridge?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been eating my porridge? Look, it is all gone!
Storyteller 3: They saw the chairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sitting on my chair? Look, it’s broken!
Storyteller 3: They walked upstairs and Daddy Bear said…
Daddy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 1: Mummy Bear said…
Mummy Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed?
Storyteller 2: Baby Bear said…
Baby Bear: Who has been sleeping in my bed? And look, she is still there!
Storyteller 3: Goldilocks woke and screamed.
Storyteller 1: She jumped out of bed and ran down the stairs and out of the house.
Storyteller 2: The three bears never saw her again
Storytellers: The end.

For more play scripts based on Fairytales, click here.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Workshop for children.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Movement Story for children.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – A simple five minute play script for young children

Posted in Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama strategies, Elements of Drama, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Getting to know you games

Back to school “Getting to Know you Games”

Group Of Children With Teacher Enjoying Drama Class Together

Back to school “Getting to Know you Games”

Game: Data Processing
Level: Elementary+
Other benefits: The main aim of this activity is to provide the students
with the opportunity to ask each other personal questions. The game can
also be used to develop listening skills.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Get the class to work together and get them to get into a
straight line:
• Alphabetically by their first name
• Alphabetically by their surnames
• Alphabetically by their best friend’s name
• By hair length
• By shoe size
• By birthdays
• By how many brothers and sisters you have
Extension: If the students are more advanced, get them to do this exercise
by not using sound. They can only use body movements and gestures.

Game: Action Name Game
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This is another effective but simple game to practice
greetings and introductions. It also promotes awareness and teamwork
skills.
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Instructions: Have everyone sit in circle. The first student says, “Hi
my name is ____” The student then does an action, and the rest of the
group says, “Hi _____, pleased to meet you,” and repeats the action.
This continues until everyone has a chance and the rest of the group has
greeted them and repeated their action.

Game: Adjective Introduction
Level: Beginners+
Other benefits: This is a good game for both learning classmates’ names
and practising adjectives.
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space, ball or a bean bag.
Instructions: The students form a circle and the teacher gives one of
them a bean bag or a ball. When they have the ball/beanbag, they must
introduce themselves and say an adjective that best describes them, for
example “Hi, my name is Annie and I’m funny.” When Annie is finished
introducing herself, she throws the ball to someone else in the circle. This
continues until everyone has had a turn.
Extension: To make this activity more difficult for more advanced
students, the adjective they choose must start with the same letter as their

Other links:

More ESL Games

ESL Storytelling Activities

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Animal Stories, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, The Frog, The Frog Prince

The 🐸 Prince – A five minute Playscript for children.

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Characters: Two storytellers, Princess, King, Frog.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a beautiful princess.
Storyteller 2: She was very vain and selfish.
Princess: I’m so beautiful. I can’t wear this dress I need a new one. It’s my birthday today I wonder what my father. The king got me.
King: Happy Birthday Princess. I’ve got a wonderful present for you.
(She opens the present)
Princess: It’s a ball.
King: Not just any old ball. It is a ball made of gold. I got it specially made for you. There isn’t another ball like it in the world.
Princess: I’ve never seen anything so beautiful in my life. A beautiful ball for a beautiful princess. I shall play with it in the garden.
Storyteller 1: She played with the ball every day.
Princess: If only I had a friend to play with. It is no fun playing ball by myself.
Frog: I’ll play with you.
Princess: You, don’t make me laugh. You are hideous. I’m not that desperate.
Frog: Your loss, I may look hideous but I’m great fun to play with.
Storyteller 2: The princess flounced off and the frog jumped back into the pond.
Storyteller 1: One day the princess was playing with her ball by the pond.
Storyteller 2: She slipped on a stone. She wobbled and then she wibbled and she slipped into the pond.
Princess: Wait, where is my ball gone? I can’t lose my ball. I can’t lose my ball, it’s my only friend.
Storyteller 1: She began looking for her ball. She couldn’t find it and began to cry.
Princess: What shall I do. I’ve lost my beautiful golden ball.
(The frog appeared from the pond. He looks concerned and put his arm around the princess to try and comfort her.)
Frog: Why are you crying princess?
Princess: I fell into the pond and lost my beautiful golden ball.
Frog: Don’t cry. I’ll help you find your golden ball.
Storyteller 1: The frog jumped back into the pond, and he found the golden ball.
Frog: You have to promise me something in return.
Princess: Anything I just want my ball back.
Frog: You must promise to be my friend.
Princess: I’ll be your friend just give me back my ball.
Frog: Not so fast. You must promise to allow me to eat with you every night and sleep next to you every night.
Princess: I promise.
Frog: Here it is.
Princess: I got my ball back.
Storyteller 1: She ran towards the castle.
Frog: Princess, come back. You promised to be my friend. Wait for me.
Princess: In your dreams, I could never be friends with an ugly thing like you. Never bother me again.
Storyteller 2: That night, the princess and the king were eating their dinner.
Frog: Knock, knock. (The frog knocks on the door.)
King: Who is it? (The frog hops in and bows before the king.)
Frog: Ribbit, ribbit. Your majesty. I helped the princess to find her golden ball. She promised that she would be my friend and that I could eat with her at the table and sleep next to her.
Princess: I lied. I just wanted my ball back.
King: Princesses never break their promises. Welcome, come and have a seat and be our guest.
Storyteller 1: They ate their dinner.
Frog: That was delicious, now it’s time for bed.
Princess: Seriously you don’t think you are coming anywhere near my bed.
King: You promised that he could sleep next to you. Remember princesses don’t break their promises.
Storyteller 2: The princess picked up the frog by his neck and plonked him down in the corner of her bedroom.
Frog: Princess, I want to sleep in your bed.
Princess: You are disgusting. How can I sleep with you? Go away and never come back.
Storyteller 1: She threw the frog on the ground,
Frog: Splat!
Princess: Oh dear, I’ve killed him. What have I done? Oh, frog, please wake up. I’m so sorry. I’ll be your friend. You can eat at my table and sleep next to me. Please, don’t die. You are my only friend. (She bends over and kisses him.)
Storyteller 2: Suddenly the frog turns into a handsome prince.
Frog/Prince: Thank you, princess, for breaking the spell.
Princess: What spell?
Frog/Prince: An evil witch turned me into a frog. She said only the friendship of a beautiful princess would break the spell.
Princess: I was so horrible to you. Can you forgive me?
Frog: Of course, I forgive you. Just promise you will never judge people by their appearance again.
Princess: I promise.
Storyteller 1: The prince and princess lived happily ever after.

For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click here.

Other plays

Thumbelina

The Money Pig

Posted in Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Drama based on the Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

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Watch Michael Rosen perform the Bear Hunt.


Ask the children what do they know about bears.
Here are 10 fun facts about bears.
There are eight species of bear: American black, polar, giant panda, Asiatic black, sloth bears, sun bears, spectacled bears and brown bears.
Bears are mammals. What other mammals do you know?
Bears can run at speeds up to 45km per hour
A male bear is known as a boar and a female is known as a sow. What other animals are known as boar and a sow?
Unlike many mammals, bears see in colour.
Grizzly bears can remember the faces of other bears they have not seen for 10 years or more.
Polar bears are the largest predators on earth. Do you know any other large predators?
Bears have an excellent sense of smell.
A group of bears is called a sloth.
Bears have great memories.

Tell the children that they are going on a bear hunt. Teach them the following chant.
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we need to go on a bear hunt? Ask the children what sort of things do they need to pack in their bags. Sunglasses, sun cream, binoculars, sandwiches, water etc. Go around the circle, eachchild gets an opportunity to mime putting an item in their bag.

When everyone is ready chant:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
Long tall grass, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children push their through the grass. They push it out of the way. They help each other. They all say swishy swash, swishy swash, swishy swash as they go.
Finally everyone is out of the grass.


Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A deep, cold river, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children jump into the river and start to swim. They all say splish splosh, splish splosh, splish, splosh as they go. They climb out of the river and continue their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
Thick oozy mud, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children walk through the mud. They get stuck and they help each other to get out of it. They all say squish squelch, squish squelch, squish squelch, as they go. Finally everyone is out of the mud and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
squish squelch,
What do we see?
A big, dark forest. , uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children walk through the first slowly. They all say stumble trap. Stumble trip, stumble trip. They finally come out the other end of the forest and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A swirling, twirling snowstorm. , uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children huddle together and walk slowly through it . They all say woo hoo, woo hoo, woo hoo. Finally the snow storm stops and they stop holding on to each other. cone out the other end of the forest and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A narrow, glumy cave, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children and walk slowly through the cave. It’s very dark so that can’t see anything. Everyone says tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe. What do we feel? One shiny wet nose, two big furry ears, two big bulgy eyes, and some very sharp teeth. Oh my goodness it’s a bear. Everyone run quick.

Tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe through the cave.
Woo hoo, woo hoo, woo hoo, through the snowstorm.
Stumble trip, stumble trip, stumble trip the forest.
squish squelch, squish squelch, squish squelch through the mud.
Spilsh splosh, splash splosh, splosh splosh through the river.
Swish swish, swish swish, swish swish through the grass.
Finally we get to our house. We open the door. Lock all the windows and doors. Run upstairs and hid under the bed.
We are never going on a bear hunt again.

 

For more children’s workshops, click here.

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, The Paperbag Princess

” The Paperbag Princess” by Robert Munsch

One of my favorite picture for children is “The Paperbag Princess. Click on the link above to see the full story.  Here are 10 intersting facts about it.

1. The Paper Bag Princess is a children’s book written by Robert Munsch and illustrated by Michael Martchenko. It was first published on 1980 by Annick Press.

2. The plot centres around the beautiful princess Elizabeth who lives a vey privilege life inside the walls of her castle. She is engaged to be married to the handsome prince Ronald. She believes she will live happily ever after until a fire breathing dragon burns all her clothes and kidnaps her handsome prince. She has nothing to wear, so she dons a paperbag to conceal her nakedness. She cleverly outwits the dragon and rescues her handsome prince. Prince Ronald who is a narcissist is appalled at her appearance. He tells her not to come near him until she has transformed herself back into a beautiful princess. She responds by calling him a bum, gives him his marching orders and dances off into the sunset.

3. The book turns gender stereotypes on its head which considering when it was published in 1980’s shows how progressive Munsch was.

4. Although this is a feminist fairytale it also transcends gender. The book shows children how to be resourceful, have humility, have confidence and most importantly know when to walk away from a bad situation.

5. Robert Munsch first told the story to a group of children in a childcare centre in the early 1970s.

6. It was Munsch’s wife who gave him the idea. She suggested getting the princess to rescue the prince.

7. The original ending had Elizabeth’s punching Ronald in the face. The ending was considered too violent so in the end she calls him a bum and walks away.

8. It has sold over three million copies world wide.

9. In some international editions bum was changed to toad.

10. The last line is “they didn’t get married after all.”

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Closure activities, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Movement activities, Relaxation games

Action Songs and Poetry for preschoolers.

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Dingle Dangle Scarecrow
When all the cows were sleeping and the sun had gone to bed
Up jumped the scarecrow and this is what he said
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.
When all the hens were rousting and the moon behind a cloud,
Up jumped the scarecrow and shouted very loud
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.

Do Your Ears Hang Low?
Do your ears hang low? Do they wobble to and fro?
Can you tie them in a knot? Can you tie them in a bow?
Can you throw them o’er your shoulder like a continental soldier?
Do your ears hang low?
Do your ears hang high? Do they reach up to the sky?
Do they droop when they are wet? Do they stiffen when they’re dry?
Can you semaphore your neighbour with a minimum of labour?
Do your ears hang high?
Do your ears flip-flop? Can you use them for a mop?
Are they stringy at the bottom? Are they curly at the top?
Can you use them for a swatter? Can you use them for a blotter?
Do your ears flip-flop? Do your ears hang out? Can you waggle them about?
Can you flip them up and down as you fly around the town?
Can you shut them up for sure when you hear an awful bore?
Do your ears hang out?

The Hokey Cokey
You put your right hand in
Your right hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
Chorus
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Knees bent, arms stretched, rah, rah, rah!
(Chorus)
You put your left hand in
Your left hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your right foot in
Your right foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your left foot in
Your left foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your whole self in
Your whole self out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.

Little Bunny Foo Foo

Hoppin through the forest

Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head.

Down came
The good fairy
And the
Good fairy said:

“Little bunny foo foo
I don’t wanna see you
Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head!”

“I’m gonna give you
Three chances
Then I’ll turn you
Into a goon!”

Little bunny foofoo
Hoppin’ through the forest
Scoopin’ up the field mice and bopping
Em’ on the head

Down came the good fairy
And she said:

” little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you
Scooping up the field mice and bopping em’ on the head
I’ll give you two more chances then I’ll turn you to a goon”
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin’ through the forest scooping up the field
and boppin’ em’ on the the head

Then the good fairy came down
And she said

Little bunny foofoo i don’t want to see you scooping up the field
much and bopping them on the head!I’ll give you one more chance
and then I’ll turn you into a goon!
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin through the forest scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head

Then the good fairy came down and she said:

Little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head I gave you 3 chances and I’m
going to turn you into a goon!

POOF!

For more movement games and activities, click here.

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker – A Playscript for children

C25BC415-D240-47DE-B17B-BEC3EFF5C392.pngThe Nutcracker 

Characters:
Two Storytellers, Clara, Godfather, Nutcracker Toy, Three Mice, Mouse King, Six Soldiers, Sugarplum Fairy, Arabian Princesses, Chinese Tea Dancers and Flower Ballerinas.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a girl called Clara. It was Christmas Eve.
Clara: (looks out the window) It is snowing. It is dazzling white except for that golden light coming from my house.
Storyteller 2: Her parents were having a Christmas Eve party.
(Clara’s godfather walks in and greets everyone.)
Godfather: Merry Christmas, Clara. (He gives Clara a hug and a large Christmas present.)
Clara: Thank you very much. I’ll put it under my Christmas tree.
Storyteller 1: That night, when everyone had gone to bed, Clara crept downstairs as quiet as a mouse.
Clara: I’m so excited to open my present from my godfather.
(She opens the present.)
Clara: It is a Nutcracker Toy. What a wonderful present. I’m so tired. (She yawns.) I’ll just have a quick nap under this Christmas tree.
Storyteller 2: Bong, bong; the clock struck midnight.
Clara: My goodness, the tree is rising above me.
(Nutcracker Toy comes to life and starts moving.)
Nutcracker Toy: Hello, Clara.
Clara: The Nutcracker Toy has come alive.
Nutcracker Toy: I’m the nutcracker prince.
Clara: What are you doing here?
Nutcracker Toy: I’ve come to protect you.
Clara: Why do I need protecting?
Nutcracker Toy: The kitchen mice are plotting to kidnap you. (He blows his whistle.) Never mind, these six soldiers are here to help you.
(The soldiers march by.)
(Mice follow the soldiers into the room.)

Mouse 1: There she is.
Mouse 2: Let’s get her.
Soldier 1: We must stop the mice.
Soldier 2: Use these lumps of cheese and fire them at the mice.
Soldier 3: Spray them with water.
Mouse 3: Help us, help us.
(The Mouse King enters.)
Mouse King: Is this the best you can do? (He whips out his sword and points it at the nutcracker prince. They have a sword fight.)
Clara: I must help the Nutcracker Toy. (She takes off her shoe and fires them at the Mouse King.)
Mouse King: Something has hit me. (He collapses and is out cold.)
Nutcracker Toy: You saved me, Clara. I must thank you.
Storyteller 2: The Nutcracker Toy called his reindeer and sleigh.
Reindeer: Your sleigh awaits, Prince.
Nutcracker Toy: Jump on board, Clara.
Clara: Where are we going?
Nutcracker Toy: It is a surprise.
Storyteller 1: They flew through an open window and into a snow-filled sky. Eventually, they arrived at their destination.
Clara: Where are we? Look, the trees are made of lollipops and the flowers are made of marshmallows.
Nutcracker Toy: This is the land of treats.
(They get off the sleigh.)
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, come. I want to show you something. This is the marzipan castle. It is decorated with ever kind of sweet you can imagine.
(He knocks at the door.)
Sugarplum Fairy: Welcome. I’m the Sugar Plum Fairy. I’m so glad you could make it. Please come inside. Make yourself at home and eat anything you want.
Clara: I’ve never seen so many cookies, cakes and candy.
Storyteller 1: Clara and the Nutcracker Toy ate to their hearts’ content.
Storyteller 2: Once they had finished all the food, they were entertained by the Arabian Princesses (the Arabian Princesses come out and dance to music), Chinese Tea Dancers (the Chinese Tea Dancers come out and dance to music), and Flower Ballerinas (the Flower Ballerinas come out and dance to music.)
Clara: This is an amazing place. I’ve had an amazing time.
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, it is time to go home.
Clara: Thank you for a wonderful adventure.
Reindeer: Hop on.
Storyteller 1: The next morning, Clara woke up underneath the Christmas tree.
Clara: Where am I? I’m underneath the Christmas tree. (She picks up the Nutcracker Toy.) Where is the prince? It must have been a dream … unless it was the magic of Christmas Eve.

For more plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, click here.

Other plays:

The Little Mermaid

The Frog Prince

Posted in creative arts, Drama, Drama for children, Esl Drama, Legends, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Saint Patrick’s day, St Patrick

St Patrick – A play for children based on an Irish Legend

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Characters: Three narrators, three slave traders, Patrick, Patrick’s mother, Patrick’s father, Rich Merchant, three sheep, God, Ship’s captain, three druids, High King, snakes (as many as you want.)
Narrator 1: Once upon a time in the north of France there lived a young boy called Patrick
Narrator 2: Patrick was young and carefree. He lived in a village with his family and friends.
Narrator 3: One night while the whole village was fast asleep, the village was raided by evil slave traders.
(Patrick and his parents are asleep. Slave traders enter the stage very quietly. They have their swords drawn.)
Slave Trader 1: Take any valuables you can lay your hands on.
Slave Trader 2: The only thing of value in this village is this young boy.
Slave Trader 3: Yes, he is young and hearty, he will make an excellent slave.
Slave Trader 1: Seize him.
Slave Trader 2: And leave the rest, they are of no use.
(Slave Traders 1 and 2 tie up Patrick’s parents.)
Patrick’s Mother: Please don’t take our son. He is our only child.
Slave Trader 3: Silence woman.
Patrick’s Father: Where are you taking him?
Slave Trader 1: We are going to sail to Ireland.
Patrick’s Father: What are you going to do with him Ireland?
Slave Trader 2: We will sell him at the market.
Slave Trader 3: People will pay good money for a strong and fit slave.
Slave Trader 1: And there is nothing you can do about it.
Narrator 1: That very night, the slave traders and the boy set sail for Ireland.
Narrator 2: Patrick was very frightened because he had only ever known a comfortable and safe life with his family in the north of France.
Patrick: I’m so scared I’ve never been anywhere by myself before.
Narrator 3: Eventually, they arrived in Ireland and the slave traders sold him to a rich merchant.
Rich Merchant: He looks very hearty and strong. I will be able to work him hard. How much do you want for this boy?
Slave Traders: Five pieces of silver.
Rich Merchant: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Boy, come with me.
Patrick: Where are we going?
Rich Merchant: You are going to work as a shepherd. You must take care of my sheep on the mountain. You can live in this stone hut. Now get to work.
Patrick: I know nothing about sheep.
Rich Merchant: I paid good money for you, so you must keep the flock safe. Make sure none of them run off or get injured.
Narrator 1: Patrick worked very hard on the mountain. Soon he became good friends with the sheep as they were his only company. (Patrick sits on a rock and looks very sad.)
Sheep 1: Baa, baa what’s the matter Patrick?
Sheep 2: You always look sad.
Patrick: I miss my family and friends very much. I want to go home.
Sheep 3: I’ve an idea that could help.
Patrick: What is it? I’ll try anything that will help me return to my family.
Sheep 3: Why don’t you ask God to help you escape and return you safely to your family.
Patrick: That’s an excellent plan. (He kneels.) God, please help me escape so I can return to my family in the north of France. (He waits for a response but there is none.) Nothing, I guess I’m stuck here.
Sheep: Be patience. God works in mysterious ways,
Narrator 2: In the seventh winter, Patrick was fast asleep in his hut one night when God came to him.
God: It’s time to leave the mountain and return to your family, friends and village. There is a ship in Wexford waiting for you.
Patrick: (wakes up) God, that’s a very dangerous plan. If I get caught I’ll surely die.
God: Well, just make sure you don’t get caught.
Sheep 1: You must go.
Sheep 2: God has spoken.
Sheep 3: We will miss you.
Patrick: I’ll miss you too, but I need to return home.
Sheep: Go quickly, bye and safe journey.
(They all hug.)
Patrick: Bye and take care.
Narrator 1: Patrick trekked through the mountains. It began to snow. He was cold and hungry.
(Music maybe played as Patrick mime going through the treacherous terrains.)
Narrator 2: He arrived in Wexford just as a big ship was to set sail.
Ship’s captain: All aboard.
Patrick: Where are you going, Captain?
Ship’s Captain: The north of France. Hop on if you want a ride.
Narrator 3: After many days, Patrick arrived home. (His parents are busying working in the fields. They notice someone walking towards. They look carefully realise it is their long, lost son.)
Patrick’s Mother: You are home. I’m so happy to see you.
Patrick’s Father: I prayed to God every day for seven years for your safe return.
(They all hug each other.)
Patrick: I’ll never leave you again.
Narrator 1: A few years later. Patrick is sleeping.
God: Patrick I need you to return to Ireland and tell the people all about me and Christianity.
Narrator 2: Before he returned to Ireland he became a monk.
Narrator 3: And then a bishop. And in 432 he returned to Ireland to tell the people about God and Christianity. (He puts on a bishop’s hat.)
Narrator 1: Patrick arrived carrying the Christian cross. The pagan druids of Ireland were not impressed.
Druid 1: What do you want with your funny ideas and your big cross.
Patrick: I’ve come to tell you stop worshiping your pagan gods. There is only one god and he is three people. The father, son and holy Ghost.
Druid 2: We should get rid of him.
Druid 1: He doesn’t agree with our pagan rituals.
Druid 2: Three people in one God. That makes no sense.
Druid 3: He is a ridiculous person.
Druid 1: How are you going to explain your God to our people.
(Patrick looks around and picks up a shamrock)
Patrick: I’ll explain it. One shamrock, Three leaves. One God, three people.
Druid 2: We have many gods and they aren’t stuck in one person.
High King: Stop this nonsense at once. Patrick, you are free to believe in whatever God you wish. Travel the land and spread the word. However, I think it will be a hard sell.
Narrator 1: Patrick travelled the country and when he reached Mayo he decided ….
Patrick: I will spend 40 days and 40 nights alone on this mountain, praying to God.
Narrator 2: While he was on the mountain top he realised there were lots of snakes. They started to surround him.
Snakes: Hisssssssssssssssssssssss
Patrick: These snakes are annoying and dangerous.
God: Banish all the serpents to the sea,
Druids and High King: Did you see that?
Patrick: All the snakes are gone.
Druid 1: I’m converted to this one god with three divine people.
Druid 2: Me too.
Druid 3: Me too.
High King: You shouldn’t have judged so quickly.
Narrator 2: Word spread and all of Ireland became Christian.
Patrick: Mission accomplished at last.
Narrator 1: Since that day there has never been a snake seen in Ireland.
Narrator 2: Patrick stayed in Ireland and he dies on the 17th March 461.
Narrator 3: Since then the 17th March has been St Patrick’s day.

For more Irish Legends on Stage, click here.

 

Other Playscripts:

Chinese New Year Play

The Monkey and the Crocodile