Posted in Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears, Still image, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, teacher in role

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Drama Workshop

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Drama Workshop

Materials: A copy of the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Bear masks and props (optional). Chairs or stools to represent the three bears’ chairs.

Warm-up: Lead the children in a warm-up activity such as stretching, dancing, or singing. Tell the children that they will be using their imagination to bring the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears to life.

Main Focus: Talking Objects – ask the children to choose an object from the story, such as the porridge, chairs, or beds. Ask the children to imagine what the object might say or feel if it could talk. Encourage the children to use their creativity and imagination to come up with interesting ideas. Ask the children to take turns speaking for their object and improvising a short scene where it interacts with the other objects in the story.

Here are some examples of what the objects might say:

Porridge: “I’m too hot! I’m too cold! Why can’t anyone get me just right?”

Chairs: “I’m so big and uncomfortable. Why can’t someone make a chair that fits me just right?”

Beds: “I’m too hard! I’m too soft! Why can’t someone make a bed that’s just right for me?”

Spoon: “I’m so lonely. Nobody ever pays attention to me!”

Bowl: “I’m so empty! Fill me up, someone!”

Door: “Who’s there? Why are you coming into the bears’ house without asking?”

Window: “I’m so curious. I wonder what’s happening inside the bears’ house?”

House: “I’m just a house, but I’ve seen so much excitement since those bears moved in!”

Mime – ask the children to imagine they are Mama, Papa, or Baby Bear. Ask the children to use occupational mime to show what their bear character might do during a typical day, such as making porridge, reading a book, or going for a walk in the woods. Encourage the children to use their bodies to express different emotions, such as happiness, frustration, or tiredness.

Hot Seating -choose one child to play the role of Goldilocks. Ask the other children to take turns asking Goldilocks questions about her behaviour in the story, such as why she went into the bears’ house, why she tried their porridge, and what she would do differently if she could go back in time. Encourage the children to use their listening and communication skills to ask thoughtful questions and respond to Goldilocks’ answers. Here are some examples of questions to ask Goldilocks in the hot seat.

  • Why did you go into the bears’ house without permission?
  • How did you feel when you saw the bears’ chairs, porridge, and beds?
  • Why did you eat the bears’ porridge even though you knew it wasn’t yours?
  • How did you feel when you broke Baby Bear’s chair?
  • What would you do differently if you could go back in time?
  • How did you feel when the bears came home and discovered that you were in their house?
  • What would you say to the bears if you could apologize for your behaviour?
  • How did you feel when you ran away from the bears and the house?
  • What did you learn from your experience with the bears?
  • If you could have any wish, what would you wish for?

Teacher in Role – ask the other children to take turns acting out different scenes from the story, such as Goldilocks entering the bears’ house or the bears discovering that someone has been in their home. Encourage the teacher to play different characters in the story and interact with the children to help guide and shape the scenes.

Still Image – ask the children to work in pairs or small groups. Assign each group a scene from the story.  Ask the children to create a still image that represents the key moment in the scene. Encourage the children to use their bodies and facial expressions to convey the emotions and actions of the characters in the scene. Here are some examples of scenes from the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears:

  • Goldilocks walking through the forest and coming across the bears’ house for the first time.
  • Goldilocks entering the bears’ house and discovering the three bowls of porridge on the table.
  • Goldilocks trying the porridge and exclaiming, “This porridge is too hot! This porridge is too cold! This porridge is just right!”
  • Goldilocks trying out the three chairs and breaking Baby Bear’s chair.
  • Goldilocks exploring the bears’ house and eventually falling asleep in Baby Bear’s bed.
  • The bears coming home and discovering that someone has been in their house.
  • Mama Bear exclaiming, “Someone’s been eating my porridge!”
  • Papa Bear exclaiming, “Someone’s been sitting in my chair!”
  • Baby Bear exclaiming, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, and she’s still there!”
  • The bears discovering Goldilocks in Baby Bear’s bed and confronting her.

Closure: Have the participants sit in a circle. Explain that you are going to play a storytelling game inspired by the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Begin the story by saying “Once upon a time, there were three bears who lived in a cosy cottage in the woods.” Ask the person to your left to continue the story by adding a sentence. For example, “One day, while the bears were out for a walk, a little girl named Goldilocks stumbled upon their cottage.” Continue around the circle, with each person adding a sentence to the story. Encourage participants to use their imagination and come up with creative twists and turns in the story. Continue the story until it reaches a satisfying conclusion or until everyone has had a chance to contribute multiple times.

Click on the links below for more drama workshops based on children’s fairytales.

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This is a resource site for early education and primary school educators. The blog shares ideas for teaching creative drama/ drama in education to children.

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