Posted in Bear Hunt, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

Drama based on the Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

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Watch Michael Rosen perform the Bear Hunt.


Ask the children what do they know about bears.
Here are 10 fun facts about bears.
There are eight species of bear: American black, polar, giant panda, Asiatic black, sloth bears, sun bears, spectacled bears and brown bears.
Bears are mammals. What other mammals do you know?
Bears can run at speeds up to 45km per hour
A male bear is known as a boar and a female is known as a sow. What other animals are known as boar and a sow?
Unlike many mammals, bears see in colour.
Grizzly bears can remember the faces of other bears they have not seen for 10 years or more.
Polar bears are the largest predators on earth. Do you know any other large predators?
Bears have an excellent sense of smell.
A group of bears is called a sloth.
Bears have great memories.

Tell the children that they are going on a bear hunt. Teach them the following chant.
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we need to go on a bear hunt? Ask the children what sort of things do they need to pack in their bags. Sunglasses, sun cream, binoculars, sandwiches, water etc. Go around the circle, eachchild gets an opportunity to mime putting an item in their bag.

When everyone is ready chant:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
Long tall grass, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children push their through the grass. They push it out of the way. They help each other. They all say swishy swash, swishy swash, swishy swash as they go.
Finally everyone is out of the grass.


Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A deep, cold river, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children jump into the river and start to swim. They all say splish splosh, splish splosh, splish, splosh as they go. They climb out of the river and continue their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
Thick oozy mud, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children walk through the mud. They get stuck and they help each other to get out of it. They all say squish squelch, squish squelch, squish squelch, as they go. Finally everyone is out of the mud and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
squish squelch,
What do we see?
A big, dark forest. , uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children walk through the first slowly. They all say stumble trap. Stumble trip, stumble trip. They finally come out the other end of the forest and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A swirling, twirling snowstorm. , uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children huddle together and walk slowly through it . They all say woo hoo, woo hoo, woo hoo. Finally the snow storm stops and they stop holding on to each other. cone out the other end of the forest and continue on their way.

Everyone chants:
We are going on a bear hunt, bear hunt, bear hunt.
We are going to catch a big one, big one, big one.
What a beautiful day.
We are not scared.
What do we see?
A narrow, glumy cave, uh oh. What shall we do? Can we go under it? Can we go over it? Oh no, we have to go through it? All the children and walk slowly through the cave. It’s very dark so that can’t see anything. Everyone says tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe. What do we feel? One shiny wet nose, two big furry ears, two big bulgy eyes, and some very sharp teeth. Oh my goodness it’s a bear. Everyone run quick.

Tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe through the cave.
Woo hoo, woo hoo, woo hoo, through the snowstorm.
Stumble trip, stumble trip, stumble trip the forest.
squish squelch, squish squelch, squish squelch through the mud.
Spilsh splosh, splash splosh, splosh splosh through the river.
Swish swish, swish swish, swish swish through the grass.
Finally we get to our house. We open the door. Lock all the windows and doors. Run upstairs and hid under the bed.
We are never going on a bear hunt again.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques, The Paperbag Princess

” The Paperbag Princess” by Robert Munsch

One of my favorite picture for children is “The Paperbag Princess. Click on the link above to see the full story.  Here are 10 intersting facts about it.

1. The Paper Bag Princess is a children’s book written by Robert Munsch and illustrated by Michael Martchenko. It was first published on 1980 by Annick Press.

2. The plot centres around the beautiful princess Elizabeth who lives a vey privilege life inside the walls of her castle. She is engaged to be married to the handsome prince Ronald. She believes she will live happily ever after until a fire breathing dragon burns all her clothes and kidnaps her handsome prince. She has nothing to wear, so she dons a paperbag to conceal her nakedness. She cleverly outwits the dragon and rescues her handsome prince. Prince Ronald who is a narcissist is appalled at her appearance. He tells her not to come near him until she has transformed herself back into a beautiful princess. She responds by calling him a bum, gives him his marching orders and dances off into the sunset.

3. The book turns gender stereotypes on its head which considering when it was published in 1980’s shows how progressive Munsch was.

4. Although this is a feminist fairytale it also transcends gender. The book shows children how to be resourceful, have humility, have confidence and most importantly know when to walk away from a bad situation.

5. Robert Munsch first told the story to a group of children in a childcare centre in the early 1970s.

6. It was Munsch’s wife who gave him the idea. She suggested getting the princess to rescue the prince.

7. The original ending had Elizabeth’s punching Ronald in the face. The ending was considered too violent so in the end she calls him a bum and walks away.

8. It has sold over three million copies world wide.

9. In some international editions bum was changed to toad.

10. The last line is “they didn’t get married after all.”

Posted in Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker – A Playscript for children

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Characters: Two Storytellers, Clara, Godfather, Nutcracker Toy, Three Mice, Mouse King, Six Soldiers, Sugarplum Fairy, Arabian Princesses, Chinese Tea Dancers and Flower Ballerinas.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a girl called Clara. It was Christmas Eve.
Clara: (looks out the window) It is snowing. It is dazzling white except for that golden light coming from my house.
Storyteller 2: Her parents were having a Christmas Eve party.
(Clara’s godfather walks in and greets everyone.)
Godfather: Merry Christmas, Clara. (He gives Clara a hug and a large Christmas present.)
Clara: Thank you very much. I’ll put it under my Christmas tree.
Storyteller 1: That night, when everyone had gone to bed, Clara crept downstairs as quiet as a mouse.
Clara: I’m so excited to open my present from my godfather.
(She opens the present.)
Clara: It is a Nutcracker Toy. What a wonderful present. I’m so tired. (She yawns.) I’ll just have a quick nap under this Christmas tree.
Storyteller 2: Bong, bong; the clock struck midnight.
Clara: My goodness, the tree is rising above me.
(Nutcracker Toy comes to life and starts moving.)
Nutcracker Toy: Hello, Clara.
Clara: The Nutcracker Toy has come alive.
Nutcracker Toy: I’m the nutcracker prince.
Clara: What are you doing here?
Nutcracker Toy: I’ve come to protect you.
Clara: Why do I need protecting?
Nutcracker Toy: The kitchen mice are plotting to kidnap you. (He blows his whistle.) Never mind, these six soldiers are here to help you.
(The soldiers march by.)
(Mice follow the soldiers into the room.)

Mouse 1: There she is.
Mouse 2: Let’s get her.
Soldier 1: We must stop the mice.
Soldier 2: Use these lumps of cheese and fire them at the mice.
Soldier 3: Spray them with water.
Mouse 3: Help us, help us.
(The Mouse King enters.)
Mouse King: Is this the best you can do? (He whips out his sword and points it at the nutcracker prince. They have a sword fight.)
Clara: I must help the Nutcracker Toy. (She takes off her shoe and fires them at the Mouse King.)
Mouse King: Something has hit me. (He collapses and is out cold.)
Nutcracker Toy: You saved me, Clara. I must thank you.
Storyteller 2: The Nutcracker Toy called his reindeer and sleigh.
Reindeer: Your sleigh awaits, Prince.
Nutcracker Toy: Jump on board, Clara.
Clara: Where are we going?
Nutcracker Toy: It is a surprise.
Storyteller 1: They flew through an open window and into a snow-filled sky. Eventually, they arrived at their destination.
Clara: Where are we? Look, the trees are made of lollipops and the flowers are made of marshmallows.
Nutcracker Toy: This is the land of treats.
(They get off the sleigh.)
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, come. I want to show you something. This is the marzipan castle. It is decorated with ever kind of sweet you can imagine.
(He knocks at the door.)
Sugarplum Fairy: Welcome. I’m the Sugar Plum Fairy. I’m so glad you could make it. Please come inside. Make yourself at home and eat anything you want.
Clara: I’ve never seen so many cookies, cakes and candy.
Storyteller 1: Clara and the Nutcracker Toy ate to their hearts’ content.
Storyteller 2: Once they had finished all the food, they were entertained by the Arabian Princesses (the Arabian Princesses come out and dance to music), Chinese Tea Dancers (the Chinese Tea Dancers come out and dance to music), and Flower Ballerinas (the Flower Ballerinas come out and dance to music.)
Clara: This is an amazing place. I’ve had an amazing time.
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, it is time to go home.
Clara: Thank you for a wonderful adventure.
Reindeer: Hop on.
Storyteller 1: The next morning, Clara woke up underneath the Christmas tree.
Clara: Where am I? I’m underneath the Christmas tree. (She picks up the Nutcracker Toy.) Where is the prince? It must have been a dream … unless it was the magic of Christmas Eve.

For More Fairytales on Stage, click below, only $0.99.

 

 

Posted in Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Plays, Plays for Children, Storytelling in the Early years

The Little Red Hen – A Movement Play.

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Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher.

Movement: Action.
Little Red Hen: Make yourself as small as possible and cluck around like a chicken.
Plant: Mime digging a hole and planting a seed.
Wheat: Make your body into the shape of a wheat plant.
Dogs: Move and bark like a dog.
Ducks: Waddle and quack like a duck.
Geese: Move like a goose and say “gobble, gobble.”
Cats: Move like a cat and meow.
Cut: Use a slashing movement.
Bread and cakes: Mime eating a delicious cake.

 

Once upon a time, there was a little red hen that lived on a farm. She was always busy! She spent all morning laying eggs for the farmer.
“Little Red Hen, please lay an egg for my tea,” said the farmer. After the little red hen had laid her egg, she found a grain of wheat. She wanted to plant it in a field.
“I’ll ask my animal friends to help me. Dogs, Dogs! Will you help me plant the wheat?” she said.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy burying our bones. Get the ducks to help you,” barked the dogs.
“Ducks, Ducks! Will you help me plant the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy swimming. Get the geese to help you,” quacked the ducks.
“Geese, Geese! Will you help me plant the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy sunbathing. Get the cats to help you,” gaggled the geese.
“Cats, Cats! Will you help me plant the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. Plant it yourself,” meowed the cats.
No one would help the little red hen, so she planted it herself. The sun and the rain helped the wheat to grow. Soon, the wheat was tall and yellow and needed to be cut. “I’ll ask my animal friends to help me. Dogs, Dogs! Will you help me cut the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy burying our bones. Get the ducks to help you,” barked the dogs.
“Ducks, Ducks! Will you help me cut the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy swimming. Get the geese to help you,” quacked the ducks.
“Geese, Geese! Will you help me cut the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy sunbathing. Get the cats to help you,” gaggled the geese.
“Cats, Cats! Will you help me cut the wheat?” said the little red hen.
“Oh no, we will not help you. We are too busy washing our faces. Cut it yourself,” meowed the cats.
So, the little red hen cut the wheat herself, and she took the wheat to the miller. The miller turned the wheat into flour.
“Here’s your flour to make bread and cakes,” said the miller.
The little red hen thanked the miller. She made bread and cakes.
“Who will help me eat the bread and cakes?” said the little red hen.
“We will!” shouted all the animals.
“Oh no, I will eat it myself. If you want to eat the food, what will you do next time?” asked the little red hen.
“We will share the work,” said all the animals.

For more movement plays, click below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Christmas drama games, Christmas plays, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama strategies, English as a second language, English teaching games, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories

Christmas Drama Games for Children

 

christmas tree

Game: What’s the time Santa Claus?
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources needed: Clear space.
Benefits: This activity is based on a popular traditional children’s game that can also be used very
effectively in a drama session as a warm-up game. This game also helps children with their listening
and co-ordination skills.
Instructions: One child is chosen or volunteers to be Santa Claus and stands at one side of the clear space. His/Her back is to the other children, who are standing at the opposite end of the
space. The rest of the children shout out: “What’s the time Santa Claus?” Santa Claus does not turn around. He/she replies: “four o’clock.” The children walk forward the number of steps that Santa Claus calls out (in this case, four). The children ask again: “What time is it Santa Claus?” Santa Claus replies: “five o’clock.” The children take five steps forward. The children continue to ask the question and to walk the appropriate number of steps forward. Eventually, when Santa Claus thinks that the children are near enough he/she will say: “Christmas time!” Then, Santa Claus turns around and chases the children. They must try to rush back to their starting place. If
Santa Claus catches one of them before they reach home, that child is Santa Clausin the next game.

 

Game: Elves and Reindeers
Age: 5 years+
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space.
Benefits: The children work as part of a pair but it helps them practise giving clear directions to
their partners.
Instructions: This is a fun game that children enjoy. Divide the group into pairs. Child A is the
Elf and child B is the reindeer. The elf must guide the reindeer around the clear space by giving
them very specific directions. The elf can say for example: “go ten steps forwards” or “put your
hands in the air and turn around five times”. The elf must make sure that their reindeers do not bump into other elves and reindeers in the group. They can switch roles after a few minutes.

 

Game: Mrs Claus’s Knickers
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 3
Resources needed: Clear space.
Benefits: This helps to improve eye contact and children body language. It also stimulates the
imagination as the children must come up with unique questions.
Instructions: The children sit in a circle. One child sits in the middle of the circle and everyone
in the circle takes it in turns to ask him/her a question, for example: “What did you have for
breakfast?” The child in the middle is only allowed to answer “Mrs Claus’s Knickers’ and they must not laugh or smile. If they laugh or smile they must change places with the child who ask the question.

Posted in Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Drama strategies, Elements of Drama, English as a second language, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Movement activities, Movement stories for children, Storytelling in the Early years, The Enormous Turnip

The Enormous Turnip – Drama workshop for children

 

Read the story of “The Enormous Turnip”

Warm up: Enormous, Enormous Turnip. All the children except the child who is It, sit in a circle. It walks around the circle, tapping each player on the head, saying “Enormous” each time until he decides to tap someone and say “Turnip” That child becomes the turnip and runs after It, trying to tag him before It can take his seat. If It successfully reaches the turnip’s seat without being tagged, the turnip is the new It. If the turnip tags It, then the turnip keeps his spot in the circle and It must either continue to be It for another turn or sit in the middle of the circle until another It is tagged.

Circle time: Ask the children to sit in the circle. Ask them if they can name the different characters in the story. Ask the following questions:
How would the different characters move? What would they sound like?
What do you think they were doing before they were called to help with the Turnip?
How do they feel about pulling the Turnip up and eating it?

Character exploration: Get the children find their own space in the room. When the teacher calls out a character the children have to become the character and move around the room.
Old Man: Hunches over and moves very slowly with a walking stick.
Wife: Busy doing housework and moves very busily and quickly.
Boy: Plays football, does headers, keepy ups and scores goals.
Girl: Skips along happily.
Dog: Moves like a dog and barks.
Cat: Moves like a cat and meows.
Mouse: Moves like a mouse and squeaks.

Movement story: https://dramastartbooks.com/2017/10/08/2712/ Get the children to participate in the above Enormous Turnip Movement Story.

Mime: All the children find a space and they curl up and imagine that they are a turnip seed. The seed are get bigger and bigger until eventually they grow into a large Turnip and are pulled from the earth.

Still image: They make a still image of the moment they find out that they are going to be turned into turninip soup.

Thought tracking: The teacher goes and taps each Turnip on the shoulder and they must say one word how they feel about being eaten for dinner.
Voice exploration: Each child says the following sentence
Please, please don’t eat me for your dinner.”
In a happy voice
Sad voice,
Surprised voice,
Shocked voice,
Tired voice,
Angry voice,
Scared voice,
Excited voice.

Group work: Divide the class in to groups of 3 or 4. The group have to use their bodies to make the one big, Enormous Turnip. They have to move as the turnip but stay connected.

Freeze Frame: Divide the class into groups of 8. Each group have to make six still images that tell the story. They can show it to the other groups.
Improvisation: For older children they can add dialogue to their freeze frames.

Closure: The children stand in a circle. Child A says “If I had a turnip, I would turn it in to an Apple.” Child B says “If I had a turnip, I would turn it in to an Apple and a banana.” Child C says “If I had a turnip, I would turn it in to an Apple, a banana and a cat” and so on until everyone gets a chance. If they make a mistake or stumble they are eliminated and sit down.. The last child standing at the end wins.

Play: https://dramastartbooks.com/2017/10/08/the-enormous-turnip-a-five-minute-playscript-for-children/

 

Posted in Drama for children, Fairy Tales, Nursery Rhymes, Plays, Plays for Children, Storytelling

Humpty Dumpty – a 5 minute play script for children.

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Cast of characters (14): Humpty Dumpty, Egg 1, Egg 2, Egg 3, Egg 4, General, King’s man 1, King’s man 2, King’s man 3, King’s horse 1, King’s horse 2, King’s horse 3, King and Servant.

(Stage directions: There is a big wall upstage and there are a group of eggs playing outside the wall. They accidentally throw the ball over the wall.)

Egg 1: Oh dear, what will we do now?

Egg 2: Well, one of us will have to climb over the wall and get the ball.

Egg 3: Humpty Dumpty will do it

Humpty Dumpty: Why do I have to do it?

Egg 4: Because you are bravest egg of all eggs.

Egg 1: Don’t tell us you are scared.

All: Scaredy Egg! Scaredy Egg!
Humpty Dumpty: Alright, alright I’ll do it.

(Humpty Dumpty starts to climb the wall. He is shaking because he is so scared. He gets to the top but he is too frightened to move.)

Humpty Dumpty: I can’t move. What shall I do?

(Enters General.)

General: What is going on here?

(All the eggs run off.)

Humpty Dumpty: I climbed the wall because we threw the ball over the wall and I wanted to get back for all my egg friends but now I’m stuck and I can’t get down.

General: I’ll get a ladder and help you get down. (General mimes getting a ladder but Humpty Dumpty starts to wobble and falls off the ladder.)

Humpty Dumpty: Help me! I’m broken. (Humpty Dumpty is lying on the floor.)

General: Don’t worry, I’ll call all the King’s men to come and help put you back together again.

General: (gets out his phones and dials the King’s men) Please come quick, a giant egg has fallen off a wall.

(King’s men come galloping in on their horses. They look at Humpty Dumpty on the ground.)

King’s Man 1: Oh dear, this looks very bad.

King’s Horse 1: I don’t think we are going to be able to fix him.

King’s Man 2: Don’t give up we can try.

King’s Horse 2: Look everybody where do you think this goes? (He holds up an arm.)

King’s Man 3: I think that might be his leg. (They all try hard to put him back together. They circle him so the audience can’t see while they are working on him. Then after a few minutes they stop.)

King’s Horse 3: We tried our best but there is nothing we can do.

(They all put their heads down.)

(Trumpet blows and the King’s servant enters.)

Servant: The king is coming. Everyone bow.

(They all bow as the King enters and sits at the table.)

King: I’m so hungry. (Rings bell.) What is for dinner tonight, servant?

Servant: Lots and lots of scrambled egg.

All: (Come out to the centre stage and recite the Humpty Dumpty rhyme.)
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the King’s horses and all the King’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.
They tried to push him up.
They tried to pull him up.
They tried to patch him up.
But couldn’t put him back together again.

For more plays based on Fairytales click on the link below.

Posted in Drama, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Legends, Plays, Plays for Children, St Patrick, Storytelling

The King and the Donkey’s Ears – An Irish Legend – 5 minute play scripts.

IMG_0257Narrator 1: Once upon a time, there was a boy called Donal

Narrator 2: He wanted to be a Barber when he grew up.

Donal: Mother, When I grow up I want to be a barber.

Mother: Don’t be silly. You can’t be a barber. Everyone knows what happens to Barbers in this land.

Donal: What happens?

Mother: Every year a barber gets summons to the King’s palace and they are never seen again.

Donal: That won’t happen to me.

Narrator 3: Years later Donal grew up and became a very successful; Barber.

At the palace:

King: I need a haircut. Summon Donal the barber to the Palace at once. I hear he gives a very good haircut.

Servant: Your majesty Soon there won’t be any barbers in the land. Maybe you could stop executing them.

King: Nonsense. Get him for me now. How dare you question my actions. All the barbers that cut my hair are to be executed. That is the rule.
(servant exits.)

(Messenger arrives at Donal’s house.)

Messenger: You are summoned to the palace to cut the King’s hair.

Mother: Noooooooooooooooooo. You are not to go Donal.

Donal: I must.

Mother: Stay here. I will go to the palace and talk to the King.

(Mother goes to the palace; she wails and wails.)

Narrator 1: everyone at the palace but their fingers in their ears.

Narrator 2: However, the king couldn’t because he had donkey’s ears.

(King takes off his crown and shows the audience his donkey’s ear. He puts the crown back on when he hears someone coming.)

King: Make that noise stop at once. It is driving me in insane.

Chief Minister: I can’t. She is Donal the barber’s mother. She said if you execute her son she will wait forever.

King: I can’t listen to that awful noise. Tell her if she stops immediately I will let her husband live.

(Mother stops wailing and leaves with a smile on her face.)

(Donal enters. He looks nervous.)

King: I will let you live but you must promise not to tell anyone about these…

(The king takes off his crown and shows off his donkey’s ears.)

(Donal looks very shocked.)

Donal: I promise I will never breathe a word of this to a living soul.

(Donal cuts the King hair. The king is happy and gives him some money and he puts back on his crown. Donal exits the palace.)

At Donal’s house. (Donal is sleeping.)

Narrator 2: Donal tried very hard to keep the king’s secret. However, he started to have nightmares about the king’s ears.

(Donal starts screaming in his sleep. His mother comes running in and she wakes him.

Mother: Donal, whatever is the matter? Ever since you came back from the king’s palace you have been having dreadful nightmares.

Donal: The king has a secret. I am the only person who knows. It is driving me mad that I can’t tell anyone.

Mother: Tell me.

Donal: I can’t. I promised him if he let me live I wouldn’t tell another living soul.

Mother: Well tell a tree then. It isn’t a living soul. There is a big tree down by the lake. You could whisper the secret to it.

Donal: What a good idea.

Narrator 2: The next day Donal went for a stroll down by the lake and saw the willow tree. He whispered the king’s secret to the tree.

Donal: The king has donkey’s ears, the king has donkey’s ears, the king has donkey’s ears. I feel some much better now that I have got that off my chest.

Narrator 3: One day a harpist passed by the willow tree.

Harpist: What a lovely bark. I will cut it down and make a new harp that I will play for the king.

Narrator 1: He made the harp from the tree and when it was ready he took it to the palace to play for the king.

Narrator 2: As soon as the harpist touched the strings the harp began to sing by itself.

Harp: The king has donkey’s ears.
The king has donkey’s ears.
The king has donkey’s ears.
Everyone stared at the king.
King: How dare you. Stop that harp at once. (His crown falls off and his ears are visible to everyone.

Courtier 1: Having donkey’s ears is not a big deal. Everyone has something they don’t like about themselves.

Courtier 2: This is Ireland. It is impossible to keep a secret in this country.

Courtier 3: Now we all know your secret you don’t have to hide from us anymore. Everyone is different.

Courtier 4: Now that everyone knows no more barbers must put to the death.

Narrator 3: Donal was made the royal barber and his mother was very happy.

Donal: I’m glad I’ve made you proud.

(Donal and his mother hug.)

For more Irish Legends plays click on the link below.

 

Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Legends, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling, Storytelling in the Early years, Storytelling techniques

The Thirsty Crow – A 5 minute Playscript for children

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Characters: Three storytellers, crow, bees, ladybirds, butterflies.

Storyteller 1: One fine morning the crow woke up. He was very hungry.
Storyteller 2: He decided to go looking for some breakfast.
Storyteller 3: Soon, he came across some juicy flies. (Crow eats the flies.)
Crow: That was delicious but now I’m really thirsty.
Storyteller 1: The crow flew around and he came across a pitcher.
Crow: At last, I found some water.
Storyteller 3: He pushed his beak into the pitcher.
Storyteller 1: But his beak was too big and he couldn’t reach the water.
Crow: Ouch, my poor beak. I’m so thirsty. What will I do now?
Storyteller 2: Soon some bees came buzzing by.
Crow: I’m very thirsty but my beak won’t reach the water in the pitcher.
Bees: Why don’t you tip the pitcher over and pour it out?
Crow: That won’t work because the water will spill everywhere.
Storyteller 1: The crow was very sad.
Storyteller 2: After a while some ladybirds walked by.
Ladybirds: What’s the matter, Crow?
Crow: I’m very thirsty but my beak won’t reach the water in the pitcher.
Ladybirds: Why don’t you break the pitcher with one of these stones? (They pick up some stones and Crow: That won’t work because the water will spill everywhere.
Storyteller 3: Soon, some butterflies flew by.
Butterflies: What’s the matter, Crow?
Crow: I’m very thirsty but my beak won’t reach the water in the pitcher.
Butterflies: Why don’t you put these stones into the pitcher and the water level will rise and then Crow: What a good idea. (He picks up stones and puts them in the pitcher one by one. The butterflies help Storyteller 1: Eventually the water rose to the top.
Crow: Now, I can reach the water.
Storyteller 1: The crow drank and drank until he was satisfied.
Storyteller 2: Then she flew off to enjoy the rest of her day.
Storyteller 3: The moral of the story is …….where there is a will, there is a way..

Posted in Drama for children, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Storytelling, The Emperor's New Clothes

The Emperor’s New Clothes – A Playscript for Children

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Characters: Three storytellers, Dresser, Emperor, Two soldiers, Royal Advisor, Slick, Slicker, four subjects, father, small child.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, there was an emperor.
Storyteller 2: He didn’t spend much time ruling his empire
Storyteller 3: Because he was too interested in how he looked and what clothes he wore.
Emperor: (looking in the mirror) I wonder what clothes I’ll wear today. Dresser come here at once.
(Dresser comes rushing holding up two outfits, the emperor grabs one.)
Dresser: That is the tenth outfit you have tried on today, Your Excellence.
Emperor: It is important to look good when you are the emperor of all that you can see and beyond.
(Enter two soldiers.)
Soldier 1: (bows) Your Excellence, the enemy is attacking us.
Soldier 2: (bows) By land, air and sea. What shall we do?
Emperor: How dare you interrupt me with these trivial matters. I’ve way more important things to worry about, like what outfit I’m going to wear today. Please leave at once.
Storyteller 1: When the royal advisor came to advise, he dismissed him.
Royal Advisor: We must talk about how to run the empire.
Emperor: Go away, can’t you see I’m busy admiring myself and my beautiful clothes. Dresser, let’s go outside so all my subjects can admire my clothes.
(Walks up and down like he is on a catwalk. He turns and twirls so all his subjects can see and admire him.)
Subjects: (bows) You look amazing, Your Excellence.
Emperor: Dresser, next week is the annual royal parade. What shall I wear?
Dresser: You have 10,438 outfits to choose from.
Emperor: I need something new and different. I want to look fabulous. I want the whole empire to talk about me and my beautiful clothes. Find me the finest tailors in the land at once.
Dresser: (Comes on stage ringing a bell.) Hear ye, hear ye, the emperor needs a magnificent outfit for the royal parade. Can anyone help? Hear ye, hear ye.
(Enter Slick and Slicker.)
Slick: Do you hear that? We could make lots of money.
Slicker: But we aren’t tailors.
Slick: I know, but I’ve got a plan.
(They huddle together and whisper.)
(Dresser enters the palace with Slick and Slicker. The emperor is sitting on his throne.)
Dresser: I found them, Your Excellence.
Slick: I’m Slick.
Slicker: I’m Slicker. At your service. (Both bow before the emperor.)
Slick and Slicker: We are the finest tailors in the land.
Slick: I’m sure you MUST have heard of us.
Storyteller 2: The emperor liked to pretend he knew everything, so he said…
Emperor: Of course, I’ve heard of you.
Slick: Well then, you must know our clothes are very special.
Emperor: Special?
Slicker: Oh yes, they are magic clothes.
Emperor: Magic?
Slicker: Why, have you not heard? only very clever people can see our clothes.
Slick: Our clothes are invisible to stupid people.
Emperor: Make me a magic outfit at once.
Slicker: Well, it is very expensive.
Emperor: Money is no object. Here take this. (He throws a bag of money at them.) Now get to work at once. You have only a week left to make me the most spectacular outfit for the royal parade.
(Emperor and Dresser exit.)
Storyteller 2: After a few days, the emperor was excited to see his new outfit. He knocked on the door.
Emperor: Knock, knock, may I come in?
Slick and slicker: Oh no, you can’t come in. We want the outfit to be a surprise.
Emperor: Dresser, go inside and look at the outfit and tell me how fabulous it is.
(Enter Dresser. Slick holds up an imaginary outfit.)
Slick: So, what do you think?
Dresser: (Speaks to the audience.) I can’t see anything, but if I say so, everyone will think I’m stupid.
Dresser: It is wonderful, the emperor will be so happy.
Storyteller 3: He scuttled off to tell the emperor that his outfit was amazing.
Storyteller 1: News quickly spread across the empire about the magic outfit. Everyone came the day of the parade to see this fantastic suit.
Storyteller 2: On the day of the parade, the emperor entered the room for the first time.
Slick: (Holds up the outfit.) Well, what do you think?
Emperor: (Speaks to the audience.) I can’t see anything. I must be stupid, but I can’t let them now. I’ll pretend I can see it. (Turns to Slick and Slicker.) It is amazing, magnificent, fabulous.
Slicker: Well, put it on then.
Dresser: I will help you. You look fantastic.
Emperor: It is a perfect fit. Dresser, carry my train.
Storyteller 3: He admired himself one last time. The soldiers opened the palace doors.
Emperor: Let the parade commence.
Storyteller 1: The crowd gasped with excitement. They knew only clever people could see the clothes.
Subject 1: You look so handsome.
Subject 2: Such an amazing outfit.
Subject 3: What magnificent tailoring.
Emperor: The clothes I’m wearing must be beautiful.
Small child: I can’t see. I want to see the emperor’s new clothes.
Father: Come here, I’ll show you. (Father picks up the small child.)
Small child: But the emperor has no clothes on.
Subject 4: What did he say?
Subject 1: He said the emperor has no clothes on.
Subject 3: He is right, the emperor is naked.
Subject 4: The emperor has no clothes on.
Storyteller 2: Everyone started to whisper and the whispering turned into shouting.
Everyone: The emperor has no clothes on.
Emperor: (Looks down.) They are right. I’ve got no clothes on. (He tries to cover himself up.)
Slick and Slicker: Time to go with our bags full of money. (They tip toe off the stage quickly without anyone seeing them.)
Emperor: Cover me up at once. (Dresser comes running in with a blanket.)
Storyteller 3: The emperor got what he wished for. People talked about the emperor with no clothes for years to come.