Posted in Drama for children

Movement and self regulation for young children

 

 

Movement is very important for helping children increase their control over their own thoughts, emotional responses and actions. The following movement activities are fun and can be introduced easily into the day.

 

Movement Activity: Imagine You Are……

Resources needed: Clear space.

Instructions: This game helps children do traditional stretches in a creative and fun way. These stretches can be done individually or in pairs.

Imagine you are a whisk

Get the children to stand in a circle and put their hands over their head. They join their hands together and move them around in a large circle. Initially, they move their hands in a clockwise direction and when the group is comfortable moving in this direction, get them to move their hands in an anticlockwise direction.

Imagine you are an inchworm

Get the children to bend down and put their hands on the ground. Next, get them to walk their hands out in front of them until they are supporting their own body weight. The children get into a push up position.  They walk their feet up to their hands and then they continue walking their hands out and walking their feet up to their hands until they have moved to the other side of the room. Make sure that they have their own space and don’t bump into one another.

Imagine you are a car wiper

Get the children to lie on the ground. When they are comfortable get them to put their legs in the air. Slowly they move both legs from one side to another.

Imagine you are a cat stretching

Get the children to put their hands and feet are on the floor, arch their back high in the air and stretch.

Imagine you are a giant

Get the children to take a big step and lunge on each step.

Imagine you are a marching soldier

Get the children to swing their arms and bring their legs up to their chest on each step.

Imagine you are a leaping frog

Get the children to squat down. They put their hands between their knees and jump around the space.

Movement Activity: Movement Sequences

Resources needed: Clear space.

Instructions: The teacher discusses with the children different ways of moving. He/she asks the children to come up with as many ways to move as possible.

Suggestions for different ways to move:

Walk

Run

Crawl

Roll

Hop

Skip

Jump

Leap

Tiptoe

Tumble

Turn

Gallop

Twirl

Spin

Walk sideways

Walk backwards

The children will come up with many more ways of moving than those listed above.  The teacher calls out different movement sequences such as

Walk-jump-twirl-tumble-run

Spin-gallop-jump-skip-gallop

Extension: If the children are older then give them an opportunity to be the leader and call out their own movement sequences.

 

Movement Activity: Butterflies

Resources needed: Classical music pieces, scarves or dance fans

Other Benefits: Co-ordination, energy, focus, trust.

Instructions: Give the children two colourful scarves and encourage them to fly around like butterflies to the classical music. Butterflies is an excellent activity for children to use their imagination. Most children will love classical music if they are introduced to it at an early stage.

Suggestion of classical music pieces:

Carmen Overture, Georges Bizet

In the Hall of the Mountain King, Edward Grieg

The Flight of the Bumble Bee, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

The Teddy Bear’s Picnic, Henry Hall Orchestra

The Nutcracker, Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Four Seasons, Antonio Vivaldi

Carnival of the Animals, Camille Saint Saens

Hoe-Down, Aaron Copland

Hungarian Dance No.5, Johannes Brahms

 

The above activities are from Movement Start by Julie Meighan.

Movement Stories for children ages 3 to 6 by Helen Landalf

 

Posted in Drama for children

Self-Regulation Strategies, Ideas and Activities for ECEC Practitioners

 

 

 

Self-Regulation Strategies, Ideas and Activities for ECEC Practitioners

When implementing trauma-sensitive practices in ECEC settings it is important

To focus on relationships

To promote safety and trustworthiness

To engage in choice and collaboration

To encourage skill-building and competence

To create a safe and secure environment for children, which has very clear boundaries and a consistent structure.

 

Comfort Box

A comfort box is a physical box that is used to distract a child from negative thoughts and encourage more positive, soothing ones. It is an anchor of comfort when a child is experiencing periods of anxiety.

Your child’s comfort box should include only items that create happy memories, soothing sensations or pleasant feelings using the five senses. Here are some examples of items to consider including for each sense:

  • Smell: bathtime soap or your body spray/aftershave
  • Taste: their favourite sweet treat or snack
  • Sight: a picture or drawing of a fun, family experience
  • Touch: a comfort blanket or favourite cuddly toy
  • Sound: an audiobook, piece of music or sound of a loved one talking

There are lots of different things that you can include in a comfort box obviously, you will want to tailor it to the children in your care. Here are some more ideas of things in you can things you can put in a comfort box for children.

Bottle of bubbles

Fidget toys such as fidget spinners, Tangle Jr. or Puffer ball

Cuddly toy

Weighted cushions/ blankets

Sensory tunnel

Yoga poses cards

Kaleidoscope

Hourglass

Plastic snow globes

Stress balls

Play doh, clay or silly putty

Flashing toys

Pipe cleaners – to twist and bend

Spinning top

Harmonica, whistle bell, chimes

Small mirror

Pinwheels

Sensory bottles

Therapeutic stories deal with anxiety, worry or loss.

If you want to write therapeutic stories for children the following books are useful resources:

Using Story Telling as a Therapeutic Tool with Children by Margot Sunderland

Using Stories to Build Bridges with Traumatized Children: Creative Ideas for Therapy, Life Story Work, Direct Work and Parenting by Kim S. Golding

Posted in Christmas drama games, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Plays for Children

More Christmas Drama Games for Children

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: If I Could Be a Christmas Toy…

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space.

 Benefits: This game stimulates creativity. It helps the children to move and to get into different roles.

Instructions: Each child in the circle takes it in turn to say for example: “Hi, my name is Anna, and if I could be any Christmas toy, I would be a football because…” The children should be encouraged to come up with unusual toys. They could also comment on and respond to the other children’s choice of toy. At the end, the teacher can get the children to imagine that they are in the toy shop and then they walk around the clear space pretending to be their chosen toy.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: All I Want for Christmas Is…

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space.

Benefits: This game stimulates the imagination and is very good for focussing on memory skills. It is also an excellent listening game.

Instructions: Everyone sits in a circle. The teacher starts by saying something like: “All I want for Christmas is a doll…”  The child next to the teacher follows by first repeating what the teacher said and adding an item to the list: “All I want for Christmas is a doll and a PlayStation…” The next child continues by saying something like: “All I want for Christmas is a doll and a PlayStation and a guitar.” The game continues, with each child repeating what the previous children have said and adding one item to the Christmas list. If a child makes a mistake, then they are out of the game. The list continues until there is only one child left in the game.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: Follow the Reindeer

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 3

Resources needed: Clear space.

Benefits: This game also improves reaction and observation skills.

Instructions: All the children stand in a circle and they start walking on the spot. The teacher/volunteer is the reindeer. The reindeer makes a gesture and the children copy it, for example, waving their left hand. Then the reindeer shouts out the name of one of the children in the group and they must change or add to the action, for example, waving their left and right hands. The game can continue until everyone in the circle has had a chance to add or to change an action.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: Santa Claus’s Glasses

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space, glasses.

 Benefits: This is an effective listening game. It can also be used to improve concentration skills.

Instructions: One child is chosen to be Santa Claus. Santa Claus puts the glasses on his head and faces a wall at one side of the clear space. The other children in the group must go to the other side of the space. They must try to creep up on Santa Claus and take his glasses. Santa Claus can turn around suddenly at any time. If he sees anyone moving that child must start again from the beginning.

More Christmas drama games

The Littlest Xmas Tree Play for Children

 

Posted in Action Poems, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Mime, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

The Magical Music Shop -A Movement Story


The Magical Music Shop -A Movement Story

Resources needed: Clear space, triangle and pictures of different types of instruments (optional).

Introduction: Tell the children they are going to participate in a movement story about a magical music shop. Show them pictures of different type of instruments. Discuss different kind of musical instrument families.

Brass instruments are made of brass or another metal and they make sound when air is blown into them. The instruments in the brass family include trumpet, trombone, tuba, French horn, cornet, and bugle.

Percussion instruments usually make sound when they are hit or shaken. The instruments in the percussion family include drums, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, chimes, bells, and xylophone.

String instruments are made with strings. The strings may be struck, plucked or bowed. The instruments in this family include violin, viola, cello, bass.

Woodwind instruments make sound when air is blown inside or across them and vibrates. Woodwind instruments include flute, clarinet, recorder, bassoon, and oboe.

Ask the children what their favourite instrument is? If they could be an instrument what would it be? Why did they choose it? What sound does their chosen instrument make? If their instrument could move how would it move? What kind of musical family does their chosen instrument belong to? Make sure everyone has a chance to explain their choice. Before the story starts get one of the children to volunteer to be the music shop owner. The teacher is the narrator. The rest of the children are their chosen instruments.

Narrator: Once upon a time there was a very special music shop. The music shop was special because all the instruments that lived in the shop were magic. (The children all freeze in the shape of their instrument.) The music shop owner loved his instruments very much. He treated them with tender loving care. (The owner goes around the shop. He polishes and dusts all the instruments.) Every night the owner would close the shop and go upstairs to bed. (The shop owner goes off to bed and lies on the floor and falls asleep. He snores loudly.) What the owner didn’t know was when the clock struck midnight the instruments would come alive. (Narrator tinkles the triangle.) The magic instruments would come down from their shelves and out from the window display. (The instruments start to move slowly out of their positions.) They would all play together. (The instruments start playing their music and moving around interacting with one another.) The instruments were so happy when they were with their friends. They had so much fun and nobody knew about their magic powers. Every morning when the instruments heard the music shop owner’s footsteps (the owner makes loud stomping noises with his feet) they would quickly run back to their places on the shelves or in the window display. (The instruments go back to their original positions and freeze.) Every morning the music shop owner would walk around the shop inspecting his instruments and every morning he would rub his head and say, “That’s funny. I thought I had put the violin on that shelf, or didn’t I leave the drum on the window.” But the music shop owner never suspected a thing and every night when he went to bed and the clock struck midnight the instruments would play to their hearts content. (The instruments come out and play.) Every morning the music shop owner would come and they would quickly move back to their places. (The instruments move quickly back to their positions.) (The narrator can say this section as many times as he wants.)

After a while the music shop owner knew something was not quite right. So one morning he tiptoed into the shop and he found the instruments all playing together. (The owner tiptoes very quietly into the shop.) He heard the most beautiful

Other movement stories:

The hare and the tortoise 

Adventures in Space

Posted in Drama for children

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.



This Chinese new  year is the year of the rat. Did you ever wonder how each Chinese year was assign an animal. Read the following children’s play and you will find out.

Characters: Three narrators, three Jade Emperors, rat, cat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, horse, snake, goat, rooster, monkey, dog and boar.

(Stage directions: three narrators on the left hand side of the stage. All the other characters walk around the stage showing confusion on their faces.)

Narrator 1: Long time ago in China. There was no such thing as time.

Narrator 2: Because there was no such thing as time, no one knew when to get up, or when to have their dinner or when to go to school or even when to play and have fun.

Narrator 3: Nobody did anything at the same time.

Narrator 1: The Jade Emperors who were the Emperors of Heaven knew this was a problem. (The Jade Emperors are standing on chairs looking down on all the chaos.)

Narrator 2: They decided to do some thing about it.

Jade Emperor 1: What are we going to do?

Jade Emperor 2: Everything is in chaos.

Jade Emperor 3: No one knows when to do things.

Jade Emperor 1: We have to come up with a way of measuring time.

Jade Emperor 2: Easier said then done.

Jade Emperor 3: How will we measure it?

Jade Emperor 1: Well, I have an idea.

Jade Emperor 2 and 3: Oh please, tell us.

Jade Emperor 1: Well, we could have a swimming race and the first twelve animals across the line will have a year named after them.

Jade Emperor 2: That’s a wonderful idea. Let’s call the animals.

Narrator 3: All the animals were summoned and were told about the Jade Emperor’s solutions for creating time. (They mime calling the animals and having a conversation while the narrators are talking.)

Narrator 1: All the animals were excited and lined up.

Narrator 2: Both the cat and the rat knew they weren’t good swimmers so they asked to Ox to help.

Rat: Ox can you help us, because you are so strong?

Cat: And so kind.

Ox: Of course, jump on my back and I’ll help you get across the river.

(They all line up for the race and start swimming: the ox is in front with both the cat and rat on his back. They swim around for a while and just as they approach the end of the race the rat throws the cat off the ox’s back and jumps onto the ox’s back so he is the first to cross the line.)

Rat: I won! I won!

Jade Emperor 1: Well done. The first year in the zodiac will be known as the Year of Rat. (He gets off his chair and shakes the rat’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Ox: You tricked me, rat.

Jade Emperor 2: Never mind, the second year of the zodiac will be called after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the ox’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Tiger: (struggling to swim against the current.) I am exhausted. I never swan so far before.

Emperor 3: The year of the tiger will be the third sign of the zodiac. (He gets off his chair and shakes the tiger’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Rabbit: (floating on a log) I am sorry to say I can’t swim. I hopped across on some stepping stones and then found a floating log which carried me to the shore.

Emperor 1: Well done, Rabbit. That showed imagination, so I am happy to name the fourth year after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the rabbit’s hand and gives him a medal. Dragon comes swooping down.)

Emperor 2: Dragon, why are you so late? You should have won as you can fly as well as swim.

Dragon: I was in the lead but then I saw the rabbit on a log and he needed some help so I huffed and puffed so that the log reached the shore.

Emperor 2: Well that was very kind of you and now you are here you will have the fifth year of the zodiac named after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the dragon’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Horse: Neigh! Neigh! I am going to be the sixth year. (Horse comes galloping in with the snake next to him. Snake sneaks up behind and scares him.)

Snake: Boo! (Horse jumps back.) No, Horse, I am going to be the sixth year of the zodiac.

Horse:  Well, I suppose I’ll have to settle with (for?) seventh place. I don’t mind as seven is a lucky number. (Emperors shake their hands and give them their medals.)

Narrator 1: Not long afterwards a raft arrived carrying the goat, the monkey and the rooster.

Goat: We shared the raft that the rooster found.

Rooster: The monkey and goat helped me push the raft into the water.

Monkey: We worked really well together.

Emperor: I am very pleased you worked as a team. The goat can be the eighth zodiac animal, the monkey the ninth and the rooster the tenth. (He shakes their hands and gives them medals.)

Goat, Rooster Monkey: Hurrah, we can stay together on the calendar. (The dog arrives very slowly.)

Emperor 2: Dog, where have you been? You are the best swimmer out of all the animals.

Dog: The river was so clean I decided to have a bath.

Emperor 3: Well, as you are so late then you will have to settle for eleventh place. We have only one place left. (He gets off his chair and shakes the dog’s hand and gives him a medal. The boar comes along.)

Emperor 1: Where have you been, boar? You nearly missed out on the last place.

Boar: It was such a lovely day I decided to stop and have a rest. I am here now and I am the final zodiac animal.

Emperor 2: Congratulations. (He gets off his chair and shakes the boar’s hand and gives him a medal. Cat struggles out of the water. He is not happy.)

Emperor 3: I am sorry, cat, all the places are gone.

Cat: (starts crying) Boo, hoo. I will never forgive the rat.

Narrator 2: Since then cats have never been friends with rats.

(All the animals line up in order and take a bow. The cat is in the corner sulking.)

For more children’s play click here.
Check out there following free children’s plays

Thumbelina

The Monkey and the Crocodile

The Buddha and the Beggar man

 

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, co-operation, Coordination games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

Group Of Children With Teacher Enjoying Drama Class Together
From more movement activities, games and stories, click on the image above.

The following movement activities promote the following types of coordination skills:

Gross motor coordination: This type of coordination is the movement of arms, legs and body that allows children to walk, run, jump, throw kick and twist.

Fine motor coordination: This type of coordination allows children toperform tasks that require precision. Activities that require children to manipulate small objects will improve their fine motor skills.

Hand-eye coordination: This type of coordination allows children to guide their hand to complete the task.

Movement Activities:

Movement activity: Doors and Windows

Age: 5 years

Minimum number of participants:10

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Spatial awareness, group work.

Instructions: The children form a circle while standing and holding their hands. The group spreads out enough so that everyone’s arms arestraight in the circle. This should form large spaces between the circle members. These large spaces represent the windows and doors. Then one child is chosen to be the runner. The runner starts running,and weaving in and out between the windows and doors. The children inthe circle randomly drop their arms down trying to touch or trap the runner who is weaving his/her way in and out of the windows and door.Once the runner is caught or touched by the arms of someone in the. circle, they are out. The runner chooses another child in the group to take his/her place and they become the next child to weave in and out of the windows and doors.

Movement activity: Centipede

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants:

Resources  needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Teamwork, trust.

Instructions: Divide the group into groups of 5 or 6. The children ineach group sit on the floor and hold the ankles of the child behind them. They call out left, right and the group has to try to move while everyone is holding the ankles of the child in front of them. If there is more than one group they can have a centipede race.

 Movement activity: Object Relay

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).

Other benefits: Imagination, teamwork, focus.

Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of childrenin the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the line. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of the line it has to be passed back. Suggested instructions:

  • Pass the ball overhead.
  • Pass the ball between your legs.
  • Pass the ball without using your hands.
  • Pass the ball by just using your chest.
  • Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.

Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must pass down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely is the winner.

Movement activity: Bean Bag Balance

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class Other benefits: Focus, imagination, problem solving.

Instructions: The teacher gets the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their head. Once they have mastered balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their body. Suggested Body Parts:

  • Knees
  • Foot
  • Hands
  • Thighs
  • Shoulder
  • Face
  • Wrist
  • Toes

Again, they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child that can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

 

Movement activity: Pick Up the Bean Bag

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space and a variety of bean bags, a basket orbox for each child.

Other benefits: Warm up, teamwork.

Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spreads them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect. The group could divide into sub-groups of three or four and have a race to see who can pick up the most beanbags in the time allotted.  

Movement activity: Roll the Dice

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, a dice for each member of the group.

Other benefits: Creativity, memory, focus.

Instructions: Everyone rolls their dice together. Each number corresponds to action such as: 1 Wiggle your body for 10 seconds. 2 Spin around 5 times. 3 Stand on your right leg for 15 seconds. 4 Hop 10 times. 5 Make a large circle with your arms 10 times. 6 Close your eyes and take 5 deep breaths. Once the children have become used to the actions, get them to come up with their own actions for each number.  


Movement activity: The Troll’s Bridge

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 3

Resources needed: Masking tape, objects to carry.

Other benefits: Energy, focus.

Instructions: Make a bridge with the masking tape. Tell the children that they are crossing a very narrow bridge and there is a troll thatlives underneath it. The children are crossing the bridge going to visit their friend. They are carrying a variety of objects with them.The children are told the troll won’t bother them if they stay on the narrow bridge and don’t drop anything. If they fall off the bridge or drop anything then the troll chases them. The troll can be the teacher or another child. If you want to make it more difficult tell them. to carry the objects over the bridge on their head.  

Movement activity: Cooperative Chase

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Warm-up, teamwork.

Instructions: One child volunteers to be “It.” If he catches another child in the group then they join together and connect. The connected pair need to work together to catch a third child who in turn would connect to them. They do it until everyone is connected. If the group catches someone and the connection is broken, then that child is free to go.  

From more movement activities, games and stories, click here.

For free movement activities click on the following: 

 

The hare and the tortoise movement story. 

Goldilocks and the three bears movement story

More movement activities for children. 

 

 

Posted in Drama for children

The Monkey and the Crocodile – A simple play for children based on an old Indian Story

image

Char2acters: Three storytellers, the crocodile, the crocodile’s wife and the monkey.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a crocodile that lived in the river Ganges in India.
(Crocodile enters stage swimming slowly.)
Storyteller 2: On both sides of the Ganges there were large music fruit trees.
Storyteller 3: A monkey lived in one of the trees. He ate fruit all day.
(Monkey mimes eating fruit.)
Monkey: These fruits are so delicious and juicy I’m so lucky to live in a fruit tree.
(Crocodile sits under the tree for shade.)
Crocodile: It is very hot I think I will sit under this tree and sleep in the shade. (Looks up.) The fruits on tree look so delicious. I wish I could climb the tree and pick some.
Monkey: (climbs down from the tree) Since you are resting under my tree, you are my guest. Please come and taste some of my delicious fruits.
Storyteller 1: The monkey plucked the juiciest fruit off the tree and gave it to the crocodile.
Crocodile: Oh thank you Monkey you are so kind.
Monkey: You are welcome. Come again, any time.
Storyteller 2: Soon, the crocodile came every day. They would eat the fruit and talk to one another for hours.
(Crocodile and the monkey mime having a conversation and eating lots of fruits.)
Storyteller 3: One day as the crocodile was leaving to swim home. The monkey gave him some fruit.
Monkey: Crocodile give these fruits to your wife. I plucked them especially for her.
Storyteller 1: The crocodile swam home and gave the fruit to his wife, She was very happy.
(Crocodile swims home and gives his wife the fruit.)
Crocodile’s wife: These fruits are delicious. I have never tasted such sweet fruit in all my life. Where did you get them from?
Crocodile: I got them from my friend the monkey. He lives in the fruit tree so he knows which ones are the sweetest.
Crocodile’s wife: Does the monkey eat fruit every day?
Crocodile: Yes, only the sweetest and juiciest ones. Why do you ask?
Crocodile’s wife: Because that means his heart must be so sweet. If I eat his heart I would remain young and beautiful forever. You must steal the monkey’s heart and give it to me.
Crocodile: But he is my good friend. He is my only friend. It would be unfair for me to steal his heart.
Crocodile’s wife: (gets angry) If you loved me you would do it.
Crocodile: Do not get anger my dear, I will do as you wish.
Storyteller 2: The next day the crocodile swam to the riverbank and reached the tree where the monkey lived.
Monkey: Crocodile, you are late today. I thought you weren’t coming.
Crocodile: My wife has made a meal for you. She has invited you to tea because she wants to thank you for giving her your beautiful sweet fruit.
Monkey: That’s very kind of her but I’m a land animal, I can’t swim.
Crocodile: We live on a sand bank just jump on my back and I’ll take you there.
Storyteller 3: The monkey hopped on the crocodile’s back and away they went.
Monkey: Slow down, Croc. You are going too fast.
Crocodile: I’m sorry Monkey but I have to go fast because my wife wants to eat your heart for her tea.
Monkey: Oh Croc, you should have told me this before we left. I always keep my heart in the hollow of the tree for safe keeping.
Crocodile: I’ll take you back to the tree and you can collect your heart.
Monkey: That would be great.
Storyteller 1: Crocodile turns and swims back to the tree where the monkey lives upon reaching the bank the monkey jumps off the crocodiles back and clambers up the tree. After a while the crocodile says…..
Crocodile: Monkey, you must have found your heart by now. My wife will get angry if we don’t arrive soon.
Monkey: You are so foolish crocodile. Don’t you know your heart is within yourself? It was a trick to save my life. Now leave my tree and never come back again.
Storyteller 2: The crocodile left empty handed.
(Crocodile’s wife looks very angry.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story is at times presence of mind pays well.

Click here for more children’s plays based on Panchatantra stories.

The Lion and the Clever Rabbit – A Simple Play for Children.

Drama Lesson based on “The Lion and The Clever Rabbit”

Posted in Action Poems, buddha stories, Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama for children, drama for kids, Panchatantra plays, Plays, plays about destiny, Plays about graditude, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, The Buddha and the angry man, the Buddha and the beggar man

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

 

 


Characters: Two storytellers, Beggar Man, Mouse, Man, Woman, Daughter, Wizard, Giant Turtle and Buddha.


Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there was a homeless man who begged every day for food.
(People pass by and give him food.)
Beggar Man: I’m so lucky that kind people give me food.
(Beggar Man falls asleep and mouse creeps up and steals his food. The Beggar Man wakes up suddenly and sees the mouse.)
Beggar Man: Mouse, why are you stealing my food. I’m just a poor beggar man.
Mouse: I’m doing you a favour because no matter how much you beg or how generous people are, you will never be allowed to keep more than eight items.
Beggar Man: You has decided that I can’t ow more than eight items.
Mouse: The Buddha has decided.
Beggar Man: But why me?
Mouse: Why don’t you go find him and ask him.
(Mouse scampers off with the food.)
Beggar Man: Well, I better go find the Buddha and ask him why I’m not allowed to possess more than eight items.
Storyteller 2: So the beggar man gathered his few belongings and went on a journey to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He travelled all day. As night fell, he grew cold and hungry.
Beggar Man: There is no sign of the Buddha. I’m tired and hungry. There is a light over there. Perhaps if I knock on the door, they may let me stay for the night.
(He Knocks on the door. A man opens the door with a warm smile.)
Beggar Man: I’m cold and hungry, please can I stay the night?
Man: Of course, Please come in.
Woman: Sit down and have some food with us.
(He enters the house and sits down on a table with the Man, woman and their daughter.)
Man: Where are you going at this time at night?
Beggar Man: I’m going to find the Buddha. I’ve a very important question to ask him. I just need a good night’s sleep and I’ll be on my way early in the morning.
(Man and woman look at each other.)
Woman: We have a question for you to ask the Buddha.
Man: Our daughter can’t speak. Please ask the Buddha what we need to do hear her beautiful voice.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll ask the Buddha your question. Thanks you for the food and bed.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man continues on his way and his quest to find the Buddha.
Storyteller 1: He comes across a range of mountains.
Beggar Man: Oh dear, the mountains look to difficult to climb but I really need to find the Buddha to ask my questions.
(He starts to climb the mountains.)
Beggar Man: This is very difficult. I will never make it. (he sits downs and starts to weep.)
(Enters wizard.)
Wizard: What’s the matter, young man? Why are you crying?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha but I can’t climb these mountains. I’ll never find him now.
Wizard: I’ll help you. We can use my magic to fly over the mountain come with me.
Storyteller 2: Wizard used his staff’s magic to fly the beggar man and himself across the mountains.
Beggar Man: Thank you so much, wizard. I’d have never made if it wasn’t for you.
Wizard: You are welcome but can I ask you a favour.
Beggar Man: Of course, I’ll do anything to show my gratitude.
Wizard: Can you ask the Buddha what do I have to do to get to heaven. I’ve been trying to get there for a thousand years.
(The beggar man nods his head and they hug and the wizard hops on his staff and flies off.)
Storyteller 1: The beggar man continues on his journey and comes across a river.
Beggar Man: I don’t believe this. How am I going to get across the river? (he sighs)
(Enters Giant Turtle.)
Giant Turtle: You look sad. What’s the matter?
Beggar Man: I’ve a very important questions to ask the Buddha and I can’t get across the river to find him.
Giant Turtle: Jump on my back and I’ll swim across. (The beggar man jumps on the Giant Turtle’s back and they swim across the river.
Beggar Man: Thank you, Giant Turtle. How can I repay you?
Giant Turtle: Can you ask the Buddha a question for me?
Beggar Man: Of course, what is your question?
Giant Turtle: Ask the Buddha why I haven’t become a dragon. I’ve been trying to become a dragon for 500 years.
(Beggar Man nods and hugs the giant turtle.)
Storyteller 2: Eventually the beggar man finds the Buddha under the Bodhi Tree.
Beggar Man: I’m so glad. I’ve found you. I’ve got so many question to ask you.
Buddha: I will only answer three questions.
Beggar Man: But I’ve four questions to ask and they all very important.
Buddha: Ask yourself, are they equally important?
Storyteller 1: The beggar man thought very carefully.
Beggar Man: Well, the giant turtle is trying to be a dragon for fifty years. The wizard has trying to go to heaven for 1000 years. The young girl will be unable to speak for the rest of her life if I don’t ask her question. I’m just a homeless beggar. I can go back and continue begging. My question is the least important by far.
(Beggar Man goes back to the Buddha.)
Beggar Man: My first question is how can the turtle become a dragon?
Buddha: Simple, he needs to leave the comfort of his own shell, unless he does that he will never be a dragon.
Beggar Man: My second question is how can the wizard go to heaven?
Buddha: He must put down his magic staff as it keeps him on earth. The moment he puts it down he will be free to go to heaven.
Beggar Man: My third question how can the young girl speak.
Buddha: She will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Beggar Man: Thank you for answering my questions.
Storyteller 2: The beggar man turned around and started his journey home. He meets the Giant Turtle.
Giant Turtle: Hey Beggar man, did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Take off your shell and you will become a dragon.
(Giant Turtle takes off his shell.)
Giant Turtle: I’ve this priceless pearls in my shell. Here take them. I won’t need them anymore because I’m a dragon. Good bye and good luck.)
(The dragon flies off.)
(Enters the wizard.)
Wizard: Did you ask the Buddha my question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Put your staff down and you can go to heaven.
Wizard: Here take my staff, Use its power wisely. Thank you.
(The wizard ascends into heaven.)
Beggar Man: I now I’ve wealth from the turtle and power from the wizard. He hops on the staff and makes his way back tom the family that gave him food and shelter.
Man: Hello, did you ask the Buddha our question?
Beggar Man: Of course I did. The answer is simple. Your daughter will speak when she meets her soulmate.
Daughter: Hello, you are the man that was here last week.
Woman: Looks like you found your soulmate.
(Daughter and beggar man hug.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story if you do good, you will be repaid.

 

If we’re willing to lend a hand to those who are struggling more than us, willing to help them, it may change the course of your life, your destiny. And the universe may repay you in such a way that you never would have imagined.

For more plays based on Buddha stories click here.

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

 

 

Posted in Action Poems, co-operation, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Mime, Mime for all ages, Mime for children, Mime for kids, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Fun Movement Activities for Children

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Game: Object relay
Age: 5 years +
Minimum number of participants: 4
Resources: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of children in the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the circle. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of line it has to be passed back.

Suggested instructions:
Pass the ball overhead.
Pass the ball between your legs.
Pass the ball without using your hands.
Pass the ball by just using your chest.
Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.
Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must be passed down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely are the winners.

Game: Bean Bag balance
Age: 4 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: Have the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their heads. Once they have master balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their bodies.

Suggested Body Parts:
Knees
Foot
Hand
Thigh
Shoulder
Face
Wrist
Toes
Again they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

Game: Pick up the bean bag
Age: 3 years +
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources: Clear space and a variety of bean bags.
Other Benefits:
Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spread them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect.

For more movement games click here.

For more free movement games, click below.

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

More Movement Games for Children

More Movement Games

Posted in Buddhism, Buddhism stories, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl Drama, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, Plays for well being, Plays that teach emotions, The Buddha and the angry man

The Buddha and the Angry Man – A play to help children handle insults

The Buddha and the Angry Man

(How to handle an insult)

Characters:  Storyteller, Buddha, Angry Man.

Storyteller: One day, the Buddha was walking from village to village to spread love and compassionate. (He walks slowly, looking around taking in the wonders of his surroundings.)

Buddha: What a lovely, sunny day it is for a walk.

(Suddenly, an angry man runs towards him, waving his fists.)

Angry Man: Who do you think you are?

Buddha: Whatever is the matter?

Angry Man: You that’s what is the matter, you walk around, thinking you know everything to teach goodness and love. You are just a fake, silly man in an orange robe.

Buddha: Come sit with me. (He guides towards a tree and they sit in the shade.)

Angry Man: (confused)

Why are you not angry with my insult?

Buddha: I’ve a question for you.

Angry Man: What?

Buddha: If you buy a present for someone and that person doesn’t want it then whom does the present belong to?

Angry Man: What a strange question. Me, of course, I bought the present.

Buddha: That’s right and its exactly the same with your anger.

Angry Man: That makes no sense.

Buddha: It’s very clear, if you become angry with me and I do not accept your anger then it falls back on you and all you succeed in doing is hurt yourself more.

Angry Man: What should I do?

Buddha: Rid yourself of your anger and become a more a loving person.

Angry Man: I will try. Thank you for teaching me this lesson. (They hug and wave goodbye to one another.)

Storyteller: The moral of story is when you have hate and anger towards other people only you are unhappy.

The Buddha and the Beggar Man – a children’s play about gratitude and destiny

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.