Posted in Action Poems, Animal Stories, Drama techniques, Drama workshops for children, Fairy Tales, Goldilocks anD the three bears

A drama workshop for young children – Goldilocks and the Three Bears

This Goldilocks and the Three Bears workshop is from “Drama Workshops for Young Children” by Julie Meighan. This book contains 10 drama workshops for young children. These fun-to-use and easy-to-follow workshops are designed for children between the ages of 3 and 7. The workshops are based on children’s stories. Each story is introduced at the beginning of each workshop through a movement story or a play. The definition and aim of each drama strategy used are outlined in the drama strategy glossary at the beginning of the book. The aims of these drama workshops are to

Promote children’s self-regulation

Develop children’s language and communication skills

Teach children conflict resolution

Relieve children’s emotional tension

Allow children to develop a sense of ownership.

Promote children’s social interaction skills

Empower children

 Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Each child finds a space and sits down. Each child or a group of children are assigned a specific word and a corresponding action. The narrator/teacher reads the story aloud, and when the children hear their word, they must jump up and do their actions. The words are in bold to assist the teacher/narrator.

Movement: Action/sound.

Goldilocks: Skip around the space.

Bear/Bears: Walk slowly and growl.

Bowl/Bowls: Clasp fingers together and stick out arms to make a round shape.

Porridge: Wiggle body up and down.

Chair/s: Squat down and stick out arms.

Bed/s: Lie straight on the floor.

First: Hold up one finger.

Second: Hold up two fingers.

Third: Hold up three fingers.

Narrator: Once upon a time, there was a girl called Goldilocks. One day, she decided to go for a walk in the woods. Soon, she became tired. She saw a little cottage in the woods. She knocked, but there was no answer, so she decided to go inside and rest.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. Goldilocks was hungry. She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.

“This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed.

So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.

“This porridge is too cold,” she said.

So, she tasted the third bowl of porridge.

“Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily, and she ate it all up.

After she’d eaten the three bears’ breakfasts, she decided she was feeling a little tired. So, she walked into the living room, where she saw three chairs. Goldilocks sat in the first chair to rest her feet.

“This chair is too big!” she exclaimed.

So, she sat in the second chair.

“This chair is too big, too!” she whined.

So, she tried the third and smallest chair.

“Ahhh, this chair is just right,” she sighed. But just as she settled down into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!

Goldilocks was very tired by this time, so she went upstairs to the bedroom. She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. Then she lay in the second bed, but it was too soft. Then she lay down in the third bed, and it was just right. Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” growled Papa bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” said Mama bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge, and they ate it all up!” cried Baby bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” growled Papa bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” said Mama bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair, and they’ve broken it all to pieces,” cried Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more, and when they got upstairs to the bedroom, Papa bear growled, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed,”

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, too,” said Mama bear

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, and she’s still there!” exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. She screamed, “Help!” And she jumped up and ran out of the room. Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door, and ran away into the woods. And Goldilocks never returned to the home of the three bears.

More movement stories can be found here and here.

Introduction: Show the children pictures. Tell them there are 8 different types of bears. There are eight species in the bear family: Asiatic Black Bear, Brown Bear, North American Black Bear, Panda Bear, Polar Bear, Sloth Bear, Spectacled Bear, and the Sun Bear.

Warm-up: The warm-up is a movement activity called “Does a Bear Live in the Woods?”

A clear space is needed. The teacher explains to the class that they must lie down on the ground when they come across a bear in the woods and keep very still. One child volunteers to be the bear. The bear goes to one end of the clear space and turns his/her back on the rest of the class. All the other children try to sneak up behind the bear. When the bear turns around, all the children must lie very still on the ground. If the bear sees you moving, s/he pulls you away to join him/her. Then there are two bears. Eventually, all the children are caught moving and become bears.

Voice production: Tell the children that they are going to explore different voices. We need to change our voices to show different emotions or to become different characters.

Get the group to repeat the following lines together in their normal voices:

Who has been sitting in my chair?

Who has eating my porridge?

Who has been sleeping in my bed?

Now, get the children to say the lines in the following ways:

Loud

Quiet

Fast

Slow

Sad

Happy

Angry

Excited

Surprised

Frightened

Annoyed

Role-play: “Now we are going to warm up our bodies. Everyone find a space and walk around the room as yourself. When I say freeze, I will call out different ways of walking….

Walk as

Papa bear

Mama bear

Baby bear

Goldilocks

Grumpy Papa bear

Kind Mama bear

Happy Baby bear

Surprised Goldilocks

Sculpting: Divide the class into pairs: one person is the sculptor the other is the clay. Get the sculptor to mould the clay into…

How did Goldilocks feel when the bears found her?

How did Baby bear feel when he saw that his porridge had been eaten?

How did Mama bear feel when she saw that someone had been sleeping in her bed?

How did Papa bear feel when he saw Goldilocks sleeping in the bed?

It can be abstract. The teacher/children look at each sculpture and guess how the characters are feeling.

Movement poem: Teach the children the following poem and actions.

When Goldilocks Went to the House of the Bears

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears (the children walk on the spot), oh, what did her blue eyes see? (The children point to their eyes.)

A bowl that was huge and a bowl that was small and a bowl that was tiny and that was all. (Children make increasingly smaller shapes with their arms to represent each bowl.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (They use one finger to point as if counting each bowl.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears (walk on the spot), oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A chair that was huge and a chair that was small, and a chair that was tiny and that was all. (Use hands to show the different heights and the size of each chair, getting smaller all the time.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (Use their fingers to point, as if counting each chair.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears (walk on the spot), oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A bed that was huge and a bed that was small and a bed that was tiny and that was all. (Use their hands to show the increasingly smaller length and size of each bed.) And she counted them – one, two, three! (Use their fingers to point, as if counting each bed.)

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears (walk on the spot), oh, what did her blue eyes see? (Point to their eyes.)

A bear that was huge and a bear that was small and a bear that was tiny and that was all. (Use hands to show the increasingly smaller height and size of each bear.)

Closure/the bears are coming: The teacher tells the children, “Before we had the internet, cars, computers, trains, planes, washing machines, and hoovers, people had to chop wood. Talk about the type of jobs people did in the olden days.” All the children must find some physical action, based on an old-fashioned job like wood chopping, hunting, or washing clothes, and begin doing this action somewhere in the room. The teacher/volunteer leaves the room momentarily and returns as the bear. Once the bear arrives, the children must freeze where they are, and the bear must try to make the other children laugh. If a child laughs, they become a bear, and the bears work together until they have made everyone laugh. The bears cannot touch the frozen children!

 

 

 

 

Posted in Christmas drama games, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Plays for Children

More Christmas Drama Games for Children

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: If I Could Be a Christmas Toy…

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space.

 Benefits: This game stimulates creativity. It helps the children to move and to get into different roles.

Instructions: Each child in the circle takes it in turn to say for example: “Hi, my name is Anna, and if I could be any Christmas toy, I would be a football because…” The children should be encouraged to come up with unusual toys. They could also comment on and respond to the other children’s choice of toy. At the end, the teacher can get the children to imagine that they are in the toy shop and then they walk around the clear space pretending to be their chosen toy.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: All I Want for Christmas Is…

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space.

Benefits: This game stimulates the imagination and is very good for focussing on memory skills. It is also an excellent listening game.

Instructions: Everyone sits in a circle. The teacher starts by saying something like: “All I want for Christmas is a doll…”  The child next to the teacher follows by first repeating what the teacher said and adding an item to the list: “All I want for Christmas is a doll and a PlayStation…” The next child continues by saying something like: “All I want for Christmas is a doll and a PlayStation and a guitar.” The game continues, with each child repeating what the previous children have said and adding one item to the Christmas list. If a child makes a mistake, then they are out of the game. The list continues until there is only one child left in the game.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: Follow the Reindeer

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 3

Resources needed: Clear space.

Benefits: This game also improves reaction and observation skills.

Instructions: All the children stand in a circle and they start walking on the spot. The teacher/volunteer is the reindeer. The reindeer makes a gesture and the children copy it, for example, waving their left hand. Then the reindeer shouts out the name of one of the children in the group and they must change or add to the action, for example, waving their left and right hands. The game can continue until everyone in the circle has had a chance to add or to change an action.

Christmas Drama Games for Children

Game: Santa Claus’s Glasses

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 5

Resources needed: Clear space, glasses.

 Benefits: This is an effective listening game. It can also be used to improve concentration skills.

Instructions: One child is chosen to be Santa Claus. Santa Claus puts the glasses on his head and faces a wall at one side of the clear space. The other children in the group must go to the other side of the space. They must try to creep up on Santa Claus and take his glasses. Santa Claus can turn around suddenly at any time. If he sees anyone moving that child must start again from the beginning.

More Christmas drama games

The Littlest Xmas Tree Play for Children

 

Posted in Action Poems, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Mime, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

The Magical Music Shop -A Movement Story


The Magical Music Shop -A Movement Story

Resources needed: Clear space, triangle and pictures of different types of instruments (optional).

Introduction: Tell the children they are going to participate in a movement story about a magical music shop. Show them pictures of different type of instruments. Discuss different kind of musical instrument families.

Brass instruments are made of brass or another metal and they make sound when air is blown into them. The instruments in the brass family include trumpet, trombone, tuba, French horn, cornet, and bugle.

Percussion instruments usually make sound when they are hit or shaken. The instruments in the percussion family include drums, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, chimes, bells, and xylophone.

String instruments are made with strings. The strings may be struck, plucked or bowed. The instruments in this family include violin, viola, cello, bass.

Woodwind instruments make sound when air is blown inside or across them and vibrates. Woodwind instruments include flute, clarinet, recorder, bassoon, and oboe.

Ask the children what their favourite instrument is? If they could be an instrument what would it be? Why did they choose it? What sound does their chosen instrument make? If their instrument could move how would it move? What kind of musical family does their chosen instrument belong to? Make sure everyone has a chance to explain their choice. Before the story starts get one of the children to volunteer to be the music shop owner. The teacher is the narrator. The rest of the children are their chosen instruments.

Narrator: Once upon a time there was a very special music shop. The music shop was special because all the instruments that lived in the shop were magic. (The children all freeze in the shape of their instrument.) The music shop owner loved his instruments very much. He treated them with tender loving care. (The owner goes around the shop. He polishes and dusts all the instruments.) Every night the owner would close the shop and go upstairs to bed. (The shop owner goes off to bed and lies on the floor and falls asleep. He snores loudly.) What the owner didn’t know was when the clock struck midnight the instruments would come alive. (Narrator tinkles the triangle.) The magic instruments would come down from their shelves and out from the window display. (The instruments start to move slowly out of their positions.) They would all play together. (The instruments start playing their music and moving around interacting with one another.) The instruments were so happy when they were with their friends. They had so much fun and nobody knew about their magic powers. Every morning when the instruments heard the music shop owner’s footsteps (the owner makes loud stomping noises with his feet) they would quickly run back to their places on the shelves or in the window display. (The instruments go back to their original positions and freeze.) Every morning the music shop owner would walk around the shop inspecting his instruments and every morning he would rub his head and say, “That’s funny. I thought I had put the violin on that shelf, or didn’t I leave the drum on the window.” But the music shop owner never suspected a thing and every night when he went to bed and the clock struck midnight the instruments would play to their hearts content. (The instruments come out and play.) Every morning the music shop owner would come and they would quickly move back to their places. (The instruments move quickly back to their positions.) (The narrator can say this section as many times as he wants.)

After a while the music shop owner knew something was not quite right. So one morning he tiptoed into the shop and he found the instruments all playing together. (The owner tiptoes very quietly into the shop.) He heard the most beautiful

Other movement stories:

The hare and the tortoise 

Adventures in Space

Posted in Drama for children

Chinese New Year Free Play Script for Children. Chinese Zodiac Story.



This Chinese new  year is the year of the rat. Did you ever wonder how each Chinese year was assign an animal. Read the following children’s play and you will find out.

Characters: Three narrators, three Jade Emperors, rat, cat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, horse, snake, goat, rooster, monkey, dog and boar.

(Stage directions: three narrators on the left hand side of the stage. All the other characters walk around the stage showing confusion on their faces.)

Narrator 1: Long time ago in China. There was no such thing as time.

Narrator 2: Because there was no such thing as time, no one knew when to get up, or when to have their dinner or when to go to school or even when to play and have fun.

Narrator 3: Nobody did anything at the same time.

Narrator 1: The Jade Emperors who were the Emperors of Heaven knew this was a problem. (The Jade Emperors are standing on chairs looking down on all the chaos.)

Narrator 2: They decided to do some thing about it.

Jade Emperor 1: What are we going to do?

Jade Emperor 2: Everything is in chaos.

Jade Emperor 3: No one knows when to do things.

Jade Emperor 1: We have to come up with a way of measuring time.

Jade Emperor 2: Easier said then done.

Jade Emperor 3: How will we measure it?

Jade Emperor 1: Well, I have an idea.

Jade Emperor 2 and 3: Oh please, tell us.

Jade Emperor 1: Well, we could have a swimming race and the first twelve animals across the line will have a year named after them.

Jade Emperor 2: That’s a wonderful idea. Let’s call the animals.

Narrator 3: All the animals were summoned and were told about the Jade Emperor’s solutions for creating time. (They mime calling the animals and having a conversation while the narrators are talking.)

Narrator 1: All the animals were excited and lined up.

Narrator 2: Both the cat and the rat knew they weren’t good swimmers so they asked to Ox to help.

Rat: Ox can you help us, because you are so strong?

Cat: And so kind.

Ox: Of course, jump on my back and I’ll help you get across the river.

(They all line up for the race and start swimming: the ox is in front with both the cat and rat on his back. They swim around for a while and just as they approach the end of the race the rat throws the cat off the ox’s back and jumps onto the ox’s back so he is the first to cross the line.)

Rat: I won! I won!

Jade Emperor 1: Well done. The first year in the zodiac will be known as the Year of Rat. (He gets off his chair and shakes the rat’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Ox: You tricked me, rat.

Jade Emperor 2: Never mind, the second year of the zodiac will be called after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the ox’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Tiger: (struggling to swim against the current.) I am exhausted. I never swan so far before.

Emperor 3: The year of the tiger will be the third sign of the zodiac. (He gets off his chair and shakes the tiger’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Rabbit: (floating on a log) I am sorry to say I can’t swim. I hopped across on some stepping stones and then found a floating log which carried me to the shore.

Emperor 1: Well done, Rabbit. That showed imagination, so I am happy to name the fourth year after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the rabbit’s hand and gives him a medal. Dragon comes swooping down.)

Emperor 2: Dragon, why are you so late? You should have won as you can fly as well as swim.

Dragon: I was in the lead but then I saw the rabbit on a log and he needed some help so I huffed and puffed so that the log reached the shore.

Emperor 2: Well that was very kind of you and now you are here you will have the fifth year of the zodiac named after you. (He gets off his chair and shakes the dragon’s hand and gives him a medal.)

Horse: Neigh! Neigh! I am going to be the sixth year. (Horse comes galloping in with the snake next to him. Snake sneaks up behind and scares him.)

Snake: Boo! (Horse jumps back.) No, Horse, I am going to be the sixth year of the zodiac.

Horse:  Well, I suppose I’ll have to settle with (for?) seventh place. I don’t mind as seven is a lucky number. (Emperors shake their hands and give them their medals.)

Narrator 1: Not long afterwards a raft arrived carrying the goat, the monkey and the rooster.

Goat: We shared the raft that the rooster found.

Rooster: The monkey and goat helped me push the raft into the water.

Monkey: We worked really well together.

Emperor: I am very pleased you worked as a team. The goat can be the eighth zodiac animal, the monkey the ninth and the rooster the tenth. (He shakes their hands and gives them medals.)

Goat, Rooster Monkey: Hurrah, we can stay together on the calendar. (The dog arrives very slowly.)

Emperor 2: Dog, where have you been? You are the best swimmer out of all the animals.

Dog: The river was so clean I decided to have a bath.

Emperor 3: Well, as you are so late then you will have to settle for eleventh place. We have only one place left. (He gets off his chair and shakes the dog’s hand and gives him a medal. The boar comes along.)

Emperor 1: Where have you been, boar? You nearly missed out on the last place.

Boar: It was such a lovely day I decided to stop and have a rest. I am here now and I am the final zodiac animal.

Emperor 2: Congratulations. (He gets off his chair and shakes the boar’s hand and gives him a medal. Cat struggles out of the water. He is not happy.)

Emperor 3: I am sorry, cat, all the places are gone.

Cat: (starts crying) Boo, hoo. I will never forgive the rat.

Narrator 2: Since then cats have never been friends with rats.

(All the animals line up in order and take a bow. The cat is in the corner sulking.)

For more children’s play click here.
Check out there following free children’s plays

Thumbelina

The Monkey and the Crocodile

The Buddha and the Beggar man

 

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, co-operation, Coordination games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama games for 3 year olds, Drama games for 4 year olds, Movement activities, Movement stories for children

Movement Activities for Children that focus on Coordination (Drama Games)

Group Of Children With Teacher Enjoying Drama Class Together
From more movement activities, games and stories, click on the image above.

The following movement activities promote the following types of coordination skills:

Gross motor coordination: This type of coordination is the movement of arms, legs and body that allows children to walk, run, jump, throw kick and twist.

Fine motor coordination: This type of coordination allows children toperform tasks that require precision. Activities that require children to manipulate small objects will improve their fine motor skills.

Hand-eye coordination: This type of coordination allows children to guide their hand to complete the task.

Movement Activities:

Movement activity: Doors and Windows

Age: 5 years

Minimum number of participants:10

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Spatial awareness, group work.

Instructions: The children form a circle while standing and holding their hands. The group spreads out enough so that everyone’s arms arestraight in the circle. This should form large spaces between the circle members. These large spaces represent the windows and doors. Then one child is chosen to be the runner. The runner starts running,and weaving in and out between the windows and doors. The children inthe circle randomly drop their arms down trying to touch or trap the runner who is weaving his/her way in and out of the windows and door.Once the runner is caught or touched by the arms of someone in the. circle, they are out. The runner chooses another child in the group to take his/her place and they become the next child to weave in and out of the windows and doors.

Movement activity: Centipede

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants:

Resources  needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Teamwork, trust.

Instructions: Divide the group into groups of 5 or 6. The children ineach group sit on the floor and hold the ankles of the child behind them. They call out left, right and the group has to try to move while everyone is holding the ankles of the child in front of them. If there is more than one group they can have a centipede race.

 Movement activity: Object Relay

Age: 5 years +

Minimum number of participants: 4

Resources needed: Clear space, a ball and a variety of objects (optional).

Other benefits: Imagination, teamwork, focus.

Instructions: Children stand in a line. If there are lots of childrenin the class you make more than one line. Each line has a ball. The ball must be passed down the line. The teacher calls out the instruction of how the ball should be passed down the line. Once the ball gets to the end of the line it has to be passed back. Suggested instructions:

  • Pass the ball overhead.
  • Pass the ball between your legs.
  • Pass the ball without using your hands.
  • Pass the ball by just using your chest.
  • Pass the ball by just using your head.

If a team drops the ball then they have to go back to the beginning.

Extension: You could have a box of different objects that they must pass down the line. Each line should have the same objects. The line that gets all the objects down safely is the winner.

Movement activity: Bean Bag Balance

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, bean bags for each member of the class Other benefits: Focus, imagination, problem solving.

Instructions: The teacher gets the children put a bean bag on their heads and they walk slowly around the room. Once they feel comfortable the children can walk faster and faster. They can see if they can run with the bean bag on their head. Once they have mastered balancing the beanbags on their head then they can see if they can balance the bean bag on other parts of their body. Suggested Body Parts:

  • Knees
  • Foot
  • Hands
  • Thighs
  • Shoulder
  • Face
  • Wrist
  • Toes

Again, they start off slowly and then they get faster and faster. The child that can balance on the most body parts and move the fastest is the winner.

 

Movement activity: Pick Up the Bean Bag

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space and a variety of bean bags, a basket orbox for each child.

Other benefits: Warm up, teamwork.

Instructions: The teacher gets a variety of bean bags and spreads them across the space. The children have 10 seconds to see how many beanbags they can collect. The group could divide into sub-groups of three or four and have a race to see who can pick up the most beanbags in the time allotted.  

Movement activity: Roll the Dice

Age: 3 years+

Minimum number of participants: 2

Resources needed: Clear space, a dice for each member of the group.

Other benefits: Creativity, memory, focus.

Instructions: Everyone rolls their dice together. Each number corresponds to action such as: 1 Wiggle your body for 10 seconds. 2 Spin around 5 times. 3 Stand on your right leg for 15 seconds. 4 Hop 10 times. 5 Make a large circle with your arms 10 times. 6 Close your eyes and take 5 deep breaths. Once the children have become used to the actions, get them to come up with their own actions for each number.  


Movement activity: The Troll’s Bridge

Age: 4 years +

Minimum number of participants: 3

Resources needed: Masking tape, objects to carry.

Other benefits: Energy, focus.

Instructions: Make a bridge with the masking tape. Tell the children that they are crossing a very narrow bridge and there is a troll thatlives underneath it. The children are crossing the bridge going to visit their friend. They are carrying a variety of objects with them.The children are told the troll won’t bother them if they stay on the narrow bridge and don’t drop anything. If they fall off the bridge or drop anything then the troll chases them. The troll can be the teacher or another child. If you want to make it more difficult tell them. to carry the objects over the bridge on their head.  

Movement activity: Cooperative Chase

Age: 3 years +

Minimum number of participants: 6

Resources needed: Clear space.

Other benefits: Warm-up, teamwork.

Instructions: One child volunteers to be “It.” If he catches another child in the group then they join together and connect. The connected pair need to work together to catch a third child who in turn would connect to them. They do it until everyone is connected. If the group catches someone and the connection is broken, then that child is free to go.  

From more movement activities, games and stories, click here.

For free movement activities click on the following: 

 

The hare and the tortoise movement story. 

Goldilocks and the three bears movement story

More movement activities for children. 

 

 

Posted in Books for children, Drama for children, fables, Fairy Tales

My top ten favourite children’s books

My Top Ten Favourite Children’s Books
  1. The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
  2. Where the Wild Things are by Maurice Sendak
  3. The Owl Babies by Martin Waddell
  4. The Paperbag Princess by Robert Munsch
  5. The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
  6. Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreas
  7. The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  8. Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
  9. Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
  10. Don’t let the Pigeon drIve the Bus by Mo Williams
Posted in Drama for children

The Monkey and the Crocodile – A simple play for children based on an old Indian Story

image

Char2acters: Three storytellers, the crocodile, the crocodile’s wife and the monkey.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a crocodile that lived in the river Ganges in India.
(Crocodile enters stage swimming slowly.)
Storyteller 2: On both sides of the Ganges there were large music fruit trees.
Storyteller 3: A monkey lived in one of the trees. He ate fruit all day.
(Monkey mimes eating fruit.)
Monkey: These fruits are so delicious and juicy I’m so lucky to live in a fruit tree.
(Crocodile sits under the tree for shade.)
Crocodile: It is very hot I think I will sit under this tree and sleep in the shade. (Looks up.) The fruits on tree look so delicious. I wish I could climb the tree and pick some.
Monkey: (climbs down from the tree) Since you are resting under my tree, you are my guest. Please come and taste some of my delicious fruits.
Storyteller 1: The monkey plucked the juiciest fruit off the tree and gave it to the crocodile.
Crocodile: Oh thank you Monkey you are so kind.
Monkey: You are welcome. Come again, any time.
Storyteller 2: Soon, the crocodile came every day. They would eat the fruit and talk to one another for hours.
(Crocodile and the monkey mime having a conversation and eating lots of fruits.)
Storyteller 3: One day as the crocodile was leaving to swim home. The monkey gave him some fruit.
Monkey: Crocodile give these fruits to your wife. I plucked them especially for her.
Storyteller 1: The crocodile swam home and gave the fruit to his wife, She was very happy.
(Crocodile swims home and gives his wife the fruit.)
Crocodile’s wife: These fruits are delicious. I have never tasted such sweet fruit in all my life. Where did you get them from?
Crocodile: I got them from my friend the monkey. He lives in the fruit tree so he knows which ones are the sweetest.
Crocodile’s wife: Does the monkey eat fruit every day?
Crocodile: Yes, only the sweetest and juiciest ones. Why do you ask?
Crocodile’s wife: Because that means his heart must be so sweet. If I eat his heart I would remain young and beautiful forever. You must steal the monkey’s heart and give it to me.
Crocodile: But he is my good friend. He is my only friend. It would be unfair for me to steal his heart.
Crocodile’s wife: (gets angry) If you loved me you would do it.
Crocodile: Do not get anger my dear, I will do as you wish.
Storyteller 2: The next day the crocodile swam to the riverbank and reached the tree where the monkey lived.
Monkey: Crocodile, you are late today. I thought you weren’t coming.
Crocodile: My wife has made a meal for you. She has invited you to tea because she wants to thank you for giving her your beautiful sweet fruit.
Monkey: That’s very kind of her but I’m a land animal, I can’t swim.
Crocodile: We live on a sand bank just jump on my back and I’ll take you there.
Storyteller 3: The monkey hopped on the crocodile’s back and away they went.
Monkey: Slow down, Croc. You are going too fast.
Crocodile: I’m sorry Monkey but I have to go fast because my wife wants to eat your heart for her tea.
Monkey: Oh Croc, you should have told me this before we left. I always keep my heart in the hollow of the tree for safe keeping.
Crocodile: I’ll take you back to the tree and you can collect your heart.
Monkey: That would be great.
Storyteller 1: Crocodile turns and swims back to the tree where the monkey lives upon reaching the bank the monkey jumps off the crocodiles back and clambers up the tree. After a while the crocodile says…..
Crocodile: Monkey, you must have found your heart by now. My wife will get angry if we don’t arrive soon.
Monkey: You are so foolish crocodile. Don’t you know your heart is within yourself? It was a trick to save my life. Now leave my tree and never come back again.
Storyteller 2: The crocodile left empty handed.
(Crocodile’s wife looks very angry.)
Storytellers: The moral of the story is at times presence of mind pays well.

Click here for more children’s plays based on Panchatantra stories.

The Lion and the Clever Rabbit – A Simple Play for Children.

Drama Lesson based on “The Lion and The Clever Rabbit”

Posted in Action Poems, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Mime, Mime for kids, Movement activities

Emotions -a drama workshop for children based on emotions


Drama is a great way of expressing emotions. Explain to the children everything we do and every thought we have comes with a feeling. Sometimes the feelings feel good and sometimes not so good. Some feelings are strong, some are weak. When we feel something we can choos want to do about that feeling. Sometimes we try to ignore it and it goes away and sometime it takes over and we cannot think of anything else. When you get a feeling, first work out what it is and come up with an idea about what to do about it.

When you are feeling…….
Happy
Angry
Bored
Worried
Sad
Excited
Grumpy
Scared
Quiet
Jealous
Embarrassed
Shy

Everyone makes mask with different emotions. Walk around the trying portray their emotions.
The rest of the class has to get what emotion you are portraying.

ACTIVITY: EMOTION ACTION SONG.

The song is a variation on the classic “If You Are Happy, And You Know It.”

When I sing this, I over exaggerate my faces. And I encourage the children to make the faces along with the body language. So often we focus emotion lessons only on faces, but children’s bodies tell us how they are feeling too.

If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it clap your hands
If you are happy, and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you are happy, and you know it, clap your hands.

Now replace happy with different emotions:

Mad – cross your arms.
Frustrated – stomp your feet.
Excited – jump up and down.
Sad – make a frown
Scared – hide your face.

Mirror, Mirror

Pair the children up. One child makes an emotion face and their partner identifies the emotion and duplicates it.

For more drama activities for children visit my amazon page.

For more free drama activities click below.

Drama workshop for children based on the Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

A Play  script for children – The Frog Prince