Posted in Aesop's fabes, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children

The Monkey and the Jealous Camel – A five minute playscript for children

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Characters: Three storytellers, Monkey, Giraffe, Lion, Kangaroo, Crocodile, Penguin, Monkey, Camel, Frog, Pig, Squirrel, Ant.

Storyteller 1: Once upon a time a long time ago.
Storyteller 2: All the animals in the world decided to have a big party to celebrate the midsummer.
Storyteller 3: It was a midsummer party and all the animals in the world were going.
Storyteller 1: From the tiniest ant to the enormous elephant.
Storyteller 2: The animals arrived Two by two.
(Everyone sings the animals arrived two by two hurrah hurrah.)
Storyteller 3: Eventually, all the animals had arrived.
(Monkey is ticking off the all the names as the animals enter. He has a click board and looks very official. Giraffe is the look out.)
Monkey: Is that everyone?
Giraffe: I think so, I can’t see anyone else coming.
Lion: Well, let’s get this party started. Welcome, everyone to this party to celebrate the
midsummer. I hope everyone will have wonderful time tonight. I want to introduce the band. Back by popular demand all the way from the Jungle. I would like to introduce our band- the animals.
(Everyone cheers, and claps Elephant is playing her trumpet with his trunk, the bear is playing the drums with his feet. Other animal musical instruments.)
Storyteller 1: Everyone danced and chatted and had a merry time.
(Music playing.)
Kangaroo: Stop the music. I just noticed that the camel isn’t here.
Crocodile: Never mind him, he is so grumpy.
Penguin: He couldn’t be bothered coming.
Giraffe: No wait, I see something coming up in the hill in the distance.
(Monkey climbs up the tree.)
Monkey: It is the camel and he doesn’t look very happy.
(The camel trundles up the hill very slowly)
Penguin: We should be very welcoming to him, when he arrives.
(Camel eventually makes his way up the hill.)
Animals: Hello Camel, welcome to the midsummer’s eve party.
Lion: Come and join us.
Camel: (sighs and wipes his brow.) This better be a good party. I have come an awfully long way.
Frog: It will be wonderful. Let’s play a game of leap frog,
(All the animals jump over one another.)
Pig: That was fun but now let’s play piggy in the middle.
(All the animals throw a ball and the pig tries to catch it.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone had so much fun.
Storyteller 3: Then the dolphins performed a lovely water display.
(Music is playing.)
Monkey: now it my turn to show my contemporary dance.
Storyteller 1: The monkey danced, and all the other animals were impressed.
(All the animals cheer and clap when the monkey is finished.)
Pig: That was amazing.
Frog: You are such a good dancer,
Camel: Harrumph! What’s all the clapping and cheering about. Anyone can dance like that.
Kangaroo: That’s not true. The monkey is a very good dancer.
Ant: You are such a grumpy all hump, Camel.
Elephant: You are just jealous Camel, everyone knows camels can’t dance.
Camel: Of course, Camels can dance.
Monkey: Go on then, show us how camels can dance.
(The Camel slowly makes his way to the middle of the circle. All the animals are staring at him and there is a deafening silence.)
Penguin: Band, Music please.
Storyteller 1: The band started to play, and the camel started to dance.
Storyteller 2: It was the most peculiar dance they had ever seen.
(Camel gives a sideways hop and wiggle and then falls over and he bashes into the band and the music stops.)
Squirrel: Watch where you are going.
(The camel does a high kick and hits the kangaroo.)
Kangaroo: Ouch. (Kangaroo starts limping.)
Storyteller 3: The camel swings his tail and the rabbit is knocked to the floor.
Storyteller 1: Then, he nearly trod on the ants.
Ant/s: Oh, my goodness. Somebody stop him before he kills us.
(The camel is so clumsy that all the animals scatter to the far side of the stage.)
Lion: (roars) Stop! Stop Camel.
Camel: But I’m in the middle of my dance. Can’t you see I’m the best dancer here.
Storyteller 1: Then, the unimaginable happened.
Storyteller 2: He stood on the lion’s tail.
Lion: (roars).
(All the animals freeze.)
Camel: Is it just me? But I get the feeling you didn’t like my dance Lion. (Looks around.) why is anyone clapping.
Pig: Your dancing is ……horrible.
Camel:(hangs his head) I must admit that it wasn’t as fun as the monkey’s dance. (Looks at the monkey) You dance very well, Monkey.
Monkey: Thank you. You have special talents too. You can walk for miles without water and you can give everyone rides on your hump.
Kangaroo: Everyone has a talent.
Lion: The world would be a strange place if we all good at the same thing.
Camel: I guess you are right. Well who would like on my hump.
All animals: Me.
Camel: Hop on then.
Storyteller 1: The camel smiled with pride and pleasure.
Storyteller 2: The moral of the story is
Storyteller 3: Everyone is good at something.

 

For more animal play scripts click on the link below.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Closure activities, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, Movement activities, Relaxation games

Action Songs and Poetry for preschoolers.

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Dingle Dangle Scarecrow
When all the cows were sleeping and the sun had gone to bed
Up jumped the scarecrow and this is what he said
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.
When all the hens were rousting and the moon behind a cloud,
Up jumped the scarecrow and shouted very loud
“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow with a flippy floppy hat,
I can shake my hands like this and shake my feet like that.

Do Your Ears Hang Low?
Do your ears hang low? Do they wobble to and fro?
Can you tie them in a knot? Can you tie them in a bow?
Can you throw them o’er your shoulder like a continental soldier?
Do your ears hang low?
Do your ears hang high? Do they reach up to the sky?
Do they droop when they are wet? Do they stiffen when they’re dry?
Can you semaphore your neighbour with a minimum of labour?
Do your ears hang high?
Do your ears flip-flop? Can you use them for a mop?
Are they stringy at the bottom? Are they curly at the top?
Can you use them for a swatter? Can you use them for a blotter?
Do your ears flip-flop? Do your ears hang out? Can you waggle them about?
Can you flip them up and down as you fly around the town?
Can you shut them up for sure when you hear an awful bore?
Do your ears hang out?

The Hokey Cokey
You put your right hand in
Your right hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
Chorus
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Whoa, the hokey-cokey
Knees bent, arms stretched, rah, rah, rah!
(Chorus)
You put your left hand in
Your left hand out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your right foot in
Your right foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your left foot in
Your left foot out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.
(Chorus)
You put your whole self in
Your whole self out
In, out, in, out
Shake it all about.
You do the hokey-cokey
And you turn around.
That’s what it’s all about.

Little Bunny Foo Foo

Hoppin through the forest

Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head.

Down came
The good fairy
And the
Good fairy said:

“Little bunny foo foo
I don’t wanna see you
Scooping up the field mice
And bopping them on the head!”

“I’m gonna give you
Three chances
Then I’ll turn you
Into a goon!”

Little bunny foofoo
Hoppin’ through the forest
Scoopin’ up the field mice and bopping
Em’ on the head

Down came the good fairy
And she said:

” little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you
Scooping up the field mice and bopping em’ on the head
I’ll give you two more chances then I’ll turn you to a goon”
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin’ through the forest scooping up the field
and boppin’ em’ on the the head

Then the good fairy came down
And she said

Little bunny foofoo i don’t want to see you scooping up the field
much and bopping them on the head!I’ll give you one more chance
and then I’ll turn you into a goon!
*the next day

Little bunny foofoo hoppin through the forest scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head

Then the good fairy came down and she said:

Little bunny foofoo I don’t want to see you scooping up the field
mice and bopping them on the head I gave you 3 chances and I’m
going to turn you into a goon!

POOF!

For more movement stories, poetry and games, click on the link below.

Posted in Action Poems, Circle games, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English teaching games, Esl, Esl Drama, expressive arts, Nursery Rhymes

Circle Time Activities for preschoolers

girls in classroom

Quiet Mouse, Still Mouse. Children sit in a circle as the leader announces which child (eventually, you hope, all of them) has become a mouse by being very quiet and still.
Alphabet Shopping. Using the first letter, match the child’s name with something to buy that begins with that letter. For example, “My name is Connor and I will buy a coat.” This facilitates teaching categories and organizational skills by using alphabet animals, foods and places.

Storm Leader starts by wiggling fingers for the rain, this passes around the circle until everyone is wiggling their fingers. The leader then changes the action to other aspects of the storm, e.g. wind – arms waving, thunder – slap knees. End with the sun – mime a circle.

Weather and calander of the day.– Start the day off by asking what is the weather like outside or what day is it. Find some visual aids or printables that show days of the week or months of the year or weather symbols to help you talk about these things.

 

For more drama games for preschoolers click on the link below.

 

Posted in Action Poems, Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, Esl, expressive arts, fables, Panchatantra plays, Plays, Plays for Children, the lion and the mouse

Rhyming Tales – The Lion and the Mouse

A king lion and a mouse under the tree

 

Rhyming Tales
The following poem can be used in a variety of ways: The practionner could read it at story time or the children could act out or mime the different parts for fun or in front of an audience. They could also be recited. Each child could learn four lines each and they could recite it as a choral piece. These stories help children with their vocal expression and give them an understanding of rhythm.

The Lion and the Mouse
There was a lion who lived in a cave.
He was extremely big and terribly brave.
The lion was not frightened of anything
Because he was the fearsome jungle king.
One day he was asleep near his house
When he was woken by a little mouse.
The lion grabbed the mouse with his large paw
He licked his lips and opened his wide jaw.-
The little mouse looked at him with sheer dread –
He didn’t want to be some scrumptious spread. –
“Squeak, squeak, Mr. Lion do not eat me
Some day I will help you so let me be.”
“You help me,” he said “I don’t think so
But I’m not that hungry, so off you go.”
One day while hunting deep in the jungle
The lion tripped over and took a tumble.
Suddenly he was stuck in an evil trap
The other animals began to clap.
He saw some grey elephants and he cried:
“Elephants, please help me I’ve swallowed my pride.”
“Oh Mr. Lion we will not help you
So how does it feel to be in a stew?”
The elephants said with extreme delight
And off they trundled into the dark night.
The lion waited and a few hours passed
Then out of the blue he saw some giraffes
“Giraffes, Giraffes,” he said, “please, please help me.”
The Giraffes looked at him and decided to flee.
He was extremely hungry and very cold
He was terribly tired and feeling less bold.
When all of a sudden down by the lake
He heard the hissing of a slimy snake.
“Snake, please, please help me I’m stuck in a trap,
I feel confused and I’m all in a flap.”
The snake hissed: “Jungle King I must admit,
You really do look like a proper twit.”
Snake laughed and laughed and felt real good
And away he slithered into the deep wood.
The Lion felt a sense of despair’
He was stuck outside in the cold night air.
Then all of a sudden out from his house
Came the patter of the little brown mouse.
“Pardon Lion I’m not one for prying
But please tell me why you are crying?”
The lion told the mouse his whole story
In all its wondrous gruesome glory.
The little mouse began to gnaw and gnaw
The scary lion sat there full of great awe.
At last, the lion roared: “I’m FREE I’m free.”
With that he invited the mouse home for tea.

For more rhyming plays click on the link below:

Posted in Drama for children, Hans Christian Andersen, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Wilde's Stories, Plays, Plays for Children, Role playing stories, Storytelling in the Early years, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid – A Children’s Play.

 

 

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Characters: Three storytellers, Little Mermaid, 5 mermaids, King, Granny, Sea Witch, Prince, Prince’s fiancée, 4 people.


Storyteller 1: Once upon a time, deep down in the ocean…
Storyteller 2: …there lived a king who was a widower. He lived with his old mother and six beautiful daughters.
Storyteller 1: The six princesses were mermaids. The littlest mermaid was the prettiest of them all.
Mermaid 1: Come everyone, let’s play.
(The six mermaids are all on stage. Two of them are playing with a ball, one is skipping, one is reading a book and two of them are playing a game of tag.)
Mermaid 2: I have an idea. Let’s swim up to the surface of the water so we can see the outside world.
Mermaid 3: That would be so exciting and fun.
Mermaid 4: We are not allowed.
Mermaid 5: We must be in our fifteenth year before we can venture up to the surface.
Little Mermaid: I know, we can ask Granny to tell us stories from the outside world.
(Granny enters.)
Little Mermaid: Granny, please tell us about the outside world. What’s it like?
Granny: It is amazing. There is air to breathe and big ships that glide on the ocean full of humans.
Little Mermaid: What’s a human?
Granny: They are like us, but they have two legs instead of tail.
Mermaid 2: They walk instead of swim. Isn’t that right, Granny?
Granny: Yes, my dear.
Mermaid 3: Do they live for 300 years like mermaids?
Granny: Oh no, dear. They might live for 70 years if they are lucky.
Mermaid 4: What happens to them when they die?
Mermaid 5: Do they turn into foam on the waves like us?
Granny: No, when they die, their body dies but their soul lives on forever.
Little Mermaid: Oh, I wish I was fifteen so I could swim to the surface and see the wonderful outside world.
Storyteller 1: One by one, the mermaids turned fifteen.
Storyteller 2: One by one, they swam to the surface and saw the wonderful world.
Storyteller 3: And one by one, they came back and told their sisters about their adventures.
(Each mermaid takes it in turn to swim to the surface and return and mime telling their sisters about their adventures. This could be a movement sequence or a dance. Music can be played in the background. Everyone leaves the stage except the Little Mermaid.)
Little Mermaid: My sisters are so lucky they have all gone to the surface except me. I can’t wait to be fifteen.
Storyteller 1: Eventually, the Little Mermaid turned fifteen. (King, Granny, and her five sisters enter the stage carrying a birthday cake and some presents.)
Everyone: Happy Birthday to you.
Happy Birthday to you.
Happy Birthday, Little Mermaid.
Happy Birthday to you.
Little Mermaid: Thank you, everyone, and thank you for all the presents.
King: The best present is yet to come. I give you permission to swim to the surface of the ocean.
Little Mermaid: I’m so excited.
King: Off you go, but remember to be back before dark.
Storyteller 1: The little mermaid swam to the surface.
Storyteller 2: She burst through the surface and gasped for air.
Storyteller 3: She couldn’t believe her eyes.
Little Mermaid: Oh my goodness, the world is more beautiful than I imagined.
(A ship floats by with people laughing and dancing inside it. They are eating and drinking.)
Little Mermaid: This must be a boat. My sisters told me about them. (She swims over and peers in the window.)
Person 1: (Raises his glass.) Happy birthday to the prince.
Person 2: Have some more birthday cake. (He cuts some cake and gives it to the prince.)
Little Mermaid: That must be the prince. He is so handsome. He has the same birthday as me.
Storyteller 1: The mermaid watched the party continue into the night.
Little Mermaid: It is dark. I should leave, but I don’t want to leave the handsome prince.
(Thunder and lightning noise.)
Little Mermaid: What’s that noise?
Prince: (Looks up into the sky.) There looks like a storm brewing.
Storyteller 2: The wind started to blow really strong, the rain came down in buckets, there was a loud clap of thunder and the lightning lit up the sky.
(The partygoers look scared and they move side to side.)
Storyteller 3: A huge wave tipped the boat over on its side. Everyone was thrown into the sea.
Everyone: Help, help.
Person 3: Where is the prince?
Person 4: He was next to me.
Person 1: Look, he is going under the water.
Person 2: Someone must help him.
(They struggle to save him but they can’t reach him.)
Little Mermaid: I must save the handsome prince.
(She dives down into the ocean and brings him to the surface. She uses all her strength to hold his head up.)
Little Mermaid: He is still alive. I must get him to the beach.
Storyteller 1: She arrived on the beach with the prince. He was still sleeping.
Storyteller 2: Some people saw him on the beach and ran to his rescue. The Little Mermaid swam off before she was seen.
Little Mermaid: He is safe now. I can go home.
(She swims underneath the water.)
King: Where have you been? I was so worried. (He hugs her tightly.)
Little Mermaid: I got stuck in the storm. I’m home now.
(King leaves the stage and the Little Mermaid looks sad and forlorn.)
Storyteller 3: The Little Mermaid felt very sad. She longed to see the handsome prince again.
(Enter her five sisters.)
Mermaid 1: What’s the matter, Little Mermaid?
Mermaid 2: You look so sad.
Mermaid 3: We thought you would be happy now that you are allowed to swim to the surface of the ocean.
Mermaid 4: You should be happy and excited.
Little Mermaid: Swimming to the surface of the ocean was all I ever wanted, but…
All Mermaids: But what?
Little Mermaid: When I went to the surface, I met the most handsome prince, but I will never be able to see him again. That’s why I’m sad.
Mermaid 5: Well, I have an idea. You could visit the Sea Witch and ask her for her help.
Mermaid 1: That’s not a good idea at all.
Mermaid 2: The Sea Witch is evil.
Mermaid 3: She won’t do you a good turn for nothing.
Little Mermaid: What choice do I have? I’m desperate to see the prince again.
Storyteller 1: Little Mermaid swam towards the Sea Witch’s house. The journey was long and treacherous. She had to fight her way passed sharks and avoid whirlpools and some very dangerous mermaid-eating plants.
Storyteller 2: Eventually, she arrived at the Sea Witch’s castle
Sea Witch: Hello, Little Mermaid. I was expecting you.
Little Mermaid: (Bows, looks scared.) You were?
Sea Witch: Yes, I see everything in my cauldron. I will change your fish tail into legs so you can walk on land, but every step you take will be extremely painful. It will be like walking on sharp swords.
Little Mermaid: I’ll do anything to be with the prince again.
Sea Witch: This comes at a price. I want you to give me your voice.
Little Mermaid: I’ll give you anything.
Sea Witch: If the prince marries you, you will become a proper human. If he marries someone else, you will die and become the foam of the waves. Either way, you will never return to the ocean and your family again.
Little Mermaid: I’ll do it. Here, take my voice.
Storyteller 3: The Sea Witch took the voice and in return gave her a bottle with a potion in it.
The Little Mermaid swam towards the surface. She swam towards the beach. When she arrived, she drank the magic potion. It didn’t taste good and she fainted.
Storyteller 1: The next day, the Little Mermaid was lying on the beach. She opened her eyes and the prince was bending over her smiling.
Prince: Who are you? Where did you come from?
Little Mermaid: Shakes her head and points to her mouth.
Prince: You have no voice? Here, let me help you?
Storyteller 2: The prince helped the Little Mermaid to walk, but every step was more painful than the last.
Prince: Come back to my palace. I’ll take care of you. You are the most beautiful girl I’ve ever seen.
Storyteller 3: As the days passed, the prince and the Little Mermaid became closer and closer. The Little Mermaid longed to tell him that she loved him.
Storyteller 1: One day, the Little Mermaid heard some bells ringing.
(The prince comes in.)
Prince: I’m getting married today. My father arranged for me to marry a princess from a nearby kingdom.
(Enter the Prince’s fiancée.)
Prince’s fiancée: You must be the beautiful girl that the prince found on the beach. Please come to our wedding. We are getting married on the big boat out there.
Little Mermaid: (Nods her head.)
Storyteller 2: Everyone celebrated the wedding on the big boat. As the first ray of dawn lit, the Little Mermaid threw herself into the sea and her body dissolved into foam.

 

For more children’s plays based on Hans Christian Andersen’s stories click on the link below.

Posted in Aesop's fabes, creative arts, Drama Activities for children, Drama for children, drama for kids, English as a second language, Esl, Esl Drama, fables, Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Plays, Plays for Children, The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker – A Playscript for children

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Characters: Two Storytellers, Clara, Godfather, Nutcracker Toy, Three Mice, Mouse King, Six Soldiers, Sugarplum Fairy, Arabian Princesses, Chinese Tea Dancers and Flower Ballerinas.
Storyteller 1: Once upon a time there lived a girl called Clara. It was Christmas Eve.
Clara: (looks out the window) It is snowing. It is dazzling white except for that golden light coming from my house.
Storyteller 2: Her parents were having a Christmas Eve party.
(Clara’s godfather walks in and greets everyone.)
Godfather: Merry Christmas, Clara. (He gives Clara a hug and a large Christmas present.)
Clara: Thank you very much. I’ll put it under my Christmas tree.
Storyteller 1: That night, when everyone had gone to bed, Clara crept downstairs as quiet as a mouse.
Clara: I’m so excited to open my present from my godfather.
(She opens the present.)
Clara: It is a Nutcracker Toy. What a wonderful present. I’m so tired. (She yawns.) I’ll just have a quick nap under this Christmas tree.
Storyteller 2: Bong, bong; the clock struck midnight.
Clara: My goodness, the tree is rising above me.
(Nutcracker Toy comes to life and starts moving.)
Nutcracker Toy: Hello, Clara.
Clara: The Nutcracker Toy has come alive.
Nutcracker Toy: I’m the nutcracker prince.
Clara: What are you doing here?
Nutcracker Toy: I’ve come to protect you.
Clara: Why do I need protecting?
Nutcracker Toy: The kitchen mice are plotting to kidnap you. (He blows his whistle.) Never mind, these six soldiers are here to help you.
(The soldiers march by.)
(Mice follow the soldiers into the room.)

Mouse 1: There she is.
Mouse 2: Let’s get her.
Soldier 1: We must stop the mice.
Soldier 2: Use these lumps of cheese and fire them at the mice.
Soldier 3: Spray them with water.
Mouse 3: Help us, help us.
(The Mouse King enters.)
Mouse King: Is this the best you can do? (He whips out his sword and points it at the nutcracker prince. They have a sword fight.)
Clara: I must help the Nutcracker Toy. (She takes off her shoe and fires them at the Mouse King.)
Mouse King: Something has hit me. (He collapses and is out cold.)
Nutcracker Toy: You saved me, Clara. I must thank you.
Storyteller 2: The Nutcracker Toy called his reindeer and sleigh.
Reindeer: Your sleigh awaits, Prince.
Nutcracker Toy: Jump on board, Clara.
Clara: Where are we going?
Nutcracker Toy: It is a surprise.
Storyteller 1: They flew through an open window and into a snow-filled sky. Eventually, they arrived at their destination.
Clara: Where are we? Look, the trees are made of lollipops and the flowers are made of marshmallows.
Nutcracker Toy: This is the land of treats.
(They get off the sleigh.)
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, come. I want to show you something. This is the marzipan castle. It is decorated with ever kind of sweet you can imagine.
(He knocks at the door.)
Sugarplum Fairy: Welcome. I’m the Sugar Plum Fairy. I’m so glad you could make it. Please come inside. Make yourself at home and eat anything you want.
Clara: I’ve never seen so many cookies, cakes and candy.
Storyteller 1: Clara and the Nutcracker Toy ate to their hearts’ content.
Storyteller 2: Once they had finished all the food, they were entertained by the Arabian Princesses (the Arabian Princesses come out and dance to music), Chinese Tea Dancers (the Chinese Tea Dancers come out and dance to music), and Flower Ballerinas (the Flower Ballerinas come out and dance to music.)
Clara: This is an amazing place. I’ve had an amazing time.
Nutcracker Toy: Clara, it is time to go home.
Clara: Thank you for a wonderful adventure.
Reindeer: Hop on.
Storyteller 1: The next morning, Clara woke up underneath the Christmas tree.
Clara: Where am I? I’m underneath the Christmas tree. (She picks up the Nutcracker Toy.) Where is the prince? It must have been a dream … unless it was the magic of Christmas Eve.

For More Fairytales on Stage, click below, only $0.99.

 

 

Posted in Closure activities, Creative Visualisation, Drama for children, drama for kids, Drama strategies, Endings, English as a second language, Movement activities, Relaxation activities for kids, Relaxation games

Closure/Relaxation Activites

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Relaxation is very important in Drama. The following activities will enable children to reduce stress and to help them release mental, physical and emotional tension. A relaxed body also leads to good voice production – benefiting all aspects of the voice such as pitch, pace, pause, inflection and projection.

Game: Be a waxwork
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space
Instructions: The children must imagine that they are a waxwork in Madame Tussauds’ Museum in London. Everyone can decide which very famous person they want to be. The children get into position and then the leader walks around looking at the waxworks and tries to guess who is who. When she has guessed everyone there is unfortunately a fire in the museum and all the waxworks melt slowly to the ground.

Game: Smoke in the chimney
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space
Instructions: The children imagine that they are smoke rising from a chimney. They move, undulating slowly. They stretch their bodies as much as they can and then they finally relax.

Game: Puppet on a string
Minimum number of participants: 2
Resources needed: Clear space
Instructions: The children imagine they are puppets with strings attached to their shoulders that someone is pulling from above. The leader tells them that they are being pulled up and their limbs fly out in all directions. Even the feet can be pulled off the ground at times. Finally the strings are cut, and the body relaxes.

Game: Floating tongue
Minimum number of participants: 1 (and the Leader)
Resources needed: Clear space
Instructions: The children are told to hold their tongues out of their mouths. They must make sure that their tongues don’t touch any part of the mouth. Then the leader tells them to clench their jaws and relax them slowly. After that they let their tongues completely relax. They should do these five times.

Game: Lion’s roar
Minimum number of participants: 1
Resources needed: Clear space
Instructions: Each child imagines that s/he is a mighty lion with a loud roar. But the roar is bottled up inside the lion. S/he should stand up like a proud lion; scrunch up his/her face and hands, ready to let the lion’s roar go. Then the leader tells them to take a deep breath and let the roar out. Tell them to stick out their tongues and hold their arms and hands out in front of them as they roar.

Game: The rock
Minimum number of participants: 1 (and the Leader)
Resources needed: Clear space and chairs
Instructions: Each child sits on a chair with knees bent, feet firmly on the ground and back straight. The leader tells them they are rocks embedded in the sea. They should feel the cool and refreshing sea water against them. Tell them to take a deep breath of sea air and let it go gently, imagining the sound of seagulls in the distance. Tell them to breathe in and out slowly and gently, feeling each breath with their whole body. When their bodies are completely relaxed, gently tell them to slowly open their eyes. Have them discuss how this felt.

Game: Happy place
Minimum number of participants: 1 (and the Leader)
Resources needed: Clear space, mats
Instructions: The children should lie down on mats and close their eyes. Tell them to imagine they are in a place where they feel happy and safe. Tell them to think about: what they see; what they hear. Tell them in their happy place they should feel safe, peaceful and relaxed. Tell them to put their left hand on top of their right hand and that when they do this in future, they will go back to their happy place. Then gently ask them to slowly open their eyes.

 

Devise your own closure activity a and post in the comments. For more closure or relaxation activity click on the link below.